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Will you buy an electric car if gas-powered cars are banned?   The Real You: Personality Poll

Started Oct-4 by Showtalk; 1240 views.
Showtalk

Poll Question From Showtalk

Oct-4

Will you buy an electric car if gas-powered cars are banned?
  • I already have one0  votes
    0%
  • I plan to buy one soon1  vote
    6%
  • I plan to buy one eventually1  vote
    6%
  • I will be forced to buy one eventually7  votes
    43%
  • No, I will give up driving by then3  votes
    18%
  • I don't drive1  vote
    6%
  • Other3  votes
    18%
I already have one 
I plan to buy one soon 
I plan to buy one eventually 
I will be forced to buy one eventually 
No, I will give up driving by then 
I don't drive 
Other 
Marci (marcinmin)

From: Marci (marcinmin) 

Oct-4

I have a hybrid right now, but would consider an electric car. I don't think non-electric ones will be banned any time soon, but the cars will have to get more efficient, especially in states with strong regulations

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Oct-4

California is banning new sales of gasoline powered cars in 2035.  Do you ever get stuck somewhere with a dead battery? That is my biggest concern, the amount of time a fully electric vehicle must spend recharging.

In reply toRe: msg 1
EdGlaze

From: EdGlaze 

Oct-4

No.

Unless they stop selling gasoline I will keep driving what I have and buy another used gas-powered car when the need arises.

Forcing citizens to buy electric cars, a major investment without the infrastructure to support it, would likely be unconstitutional.

Marci (marcinmin)

From: Marci (marcinmin) 

Oct-4

By that tome there will be a Lot more options and places to recharge. People panicked about the light but that was a non issue

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Oct-4

Tell that to Gavin Newsom who is trying to set the standard for the nation.  If they close down gas stations they essentially force people to switch.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Oct-4

That could be but how long does it take to charge? What if the power goes out and your car needs charging? We have had outages that last more than one day.

EdGlaze

From: EdGlaze 

Oct-5

So far I haven't heard that California will shut down gas stations.

Nor have I heard that efficient electric vehicle charging stations will be sufficiently available. How many chargers will each businesses need to install for their employees, especially those who must commute?

Having an electric car that only plugs in to household 120v or 240v will likely mean longer charge times. Plus not everyone has a residence where they can easily have a personal charger which may cost $500 – $1,500 plus installation, especially if they aren't able to use the same parking space each day. It becomes even more of a problem when there are multiple cars needing charging at the same charging station.

There are many articles about the benefits and problems with electric vehicles:

9 Facts About Electric Cars The Evangelists Ignore | CarBuzz

Marci (marcinmin)

From: Marci (marcinmin) 

Oct-5

any shifts will be gradual - sort of like switching from leaded to unleaded gas, but a little more high tech than that

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Oct-5

They claim 250,000 new charging stations in five years. There isn’t much I formation on how this will actually work. As you said, no mention of people living in apartments with shared spaces or those who much park overnight on the street. The goal may be to get people out of cars altogether, but areas with poor public transportation can’t do that. It would definitely limit mobility.  I know of people living in cities that have almost no access to public transportation or their destinations do not. California has also tried to shut down ride sharing by forcing them to work as employees rather than independent  contractors.  So there are greater difficulties than it appears from the article.

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