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Do You Approve Of Labradoodle Breeding?   Knock Knock - Off Topic

Started Oct-27 by kizmet1; 5593 views.
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Oct-31

They are extremely dangerous.  They appear to be sweet and appeasing, which they often are in their early years. But their genetics are to fight and kill, and eventually too many of them snap.  Once they go into fight mode, they don’t back off. They clamp down their jaws and don’t relax them, and they keep fighting even when there is no threat.  They will kill anything in their paths if they want to and if it’s possible.  People, animals, it doesn’t matter. 

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Oct-31

For a lot of people, a dog is as essential as a car.  Of course, it depends on your budget, but I’ve seen people on forums who can barely support themselves, who will pay for a quality dog if they need one.  There are still working dogs out there.  

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Oct-31

I believe the airline industry will come back. Unless people stop moving away from families and friends, stop vacationing and stop working on site, travel is a must for them.  I have already heard from people I know who can’t wait to travel out of their own countries.  This is just a temporary impediment.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Oct-31

One airline just announced they are filling what used to be the empty center seat. Probably cutting a plane from the schedule and cramming the planes again?
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Oct-31

That doesn’t sound safe unless people are family.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Oct-31

No, not even with mandatory masks used.
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Oct-31

No, masks are only a minor safety measure on a plane.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Oct-31

Unfortunately. The "experts" still fon't seem to be 100% sure of anything. Makes me wonder if I should wear my plastic mask over my cloth one?

"but I’ve seen people on forums who can barely support themselves, who will pay for a quality dog"

Jeff Foxworthy makes redneck jokes about those types.

If your hound dogs cost more than your house ... you might be a redneck.

If you mow your grass and discover a car ...

If your pickup truck cost more than your house ...

If you bought a pickup truck just to haul your hound dawgs around ...

What will probably happen in the meantime is that financially weaker airlines, and many airport, will go under. Once things come back there are likely going to be new names that bought up the assets of aircraft, land, buildings, etc. at fire sale prices. Probably a lot fewer routes, etc.

Many airliners are presently mothballed out in the Arizona desert, covered in dust proof, UV reflective and opaque "Saran Wrap". Many that were due to be retired within the upcoming 2 or 3 years may never fly again. The economic impact is staggering. It may require decades to rebuild air travel to its glory days, assuming it ever does, because with rising poverty due to job losses and likely skyrocketing taxation under the Biden administration, air travel's best days are behind it and may never recover in the US, and even less so in Europe and other nations that have had even more draconian shutdowns.

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8327011/Hundreds-planes-parked-Arizona-desert-giant-boneyard-airbase-remain-storage.html

... Stunning aerial pictures show hundreds of aircraft parked in a desert 'boneyard' after airlines including Delta and United placed them in long-term storage as flight operations are cut to around 5% of normal operations due to the coronavirus.

Ranks of jets are seen lined up at Pinal Airpark, 90 miles south of Phoenix, where the dry desert air helps to keep them in good condition and stops them from rusting while they are not being used during the global health crisis.

The 'boneyard' was already home to hundreds of retired commercial and military aircraft but now major airlines have parked up huge amount of their fleets for the foreseeable future.     

http://www.stationgossip.com/2020/05/plane-graveyard-hundreds-of-jets-are.html

...Airlines have been forced to cut back on services due to the coronavirus pandemic, with many countries closing their borders to foreign travelers in unprecedented efforts to flatten the curve of infections.

The demand for travel has plunged worldwide during the COVID-19 pandemic, as business and leisure travelers cancel their trips. 
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has been publishing information on how many passengers have passed through US airport checkpoints each day, with a comparison to how many traveled on the same day of the week last year.
In the U.S. alone, the numbers of passengers traveling are just 5% what would normally be expected, meaning there has been a whopping 95% decline travel.  ....

https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20200415-where-are-all-the-unused-planes-right-now

... With uncertainty about when it will be safe to lift the world’s lockdowns, however, there’s equal uncertainty about how many of those planes will be needed during the recovery phase, and how quickly. Demand is still, in many places, rock-bottom: earlier this month, on 2 April, just 349 people left Hong Kong Airport. Those people could easily fit on one Cathay Pacific plane, with room to spare. ...

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/ask-the-captain-what-will-it-take-to-return-parked-airplanes-to-service-after-coronavirus/ar-BB12nvoZ

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