Opinion Polls: Delphi's Polling Place

Hosted by Showtalk

Opinion polls on all subjects. Opinions? Heck yes, we have opinions - but we're *always* nice about it, even when ours are diametrically opposed to yours. Register your vote today!

  • 4167
    MEMBERS
  • 80021
    MESSAGES
  • 27
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

Crazy, inept Mayor poll. My city Mayor is...   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started Nov-23 by Showtalk; 8785 views.

IT's easy to guess from industries.

Industries that depend on large numbers of people in close proximity to one another for many hours at a time - things like indoor professional sports, things like cozy bars, places like cruise ships, may only come back as a shadow of their former selves.

Most people who worked in those professions will have, out of economic necessity, moved on to something else and will never return to their former professions.

Like when the oil boom went bust in the 1980s, there was a nearly 30 year hiatus where tens of thousands of experts left the field and moved to greener pastures, and were mostly all retired or dead when the next boom finally came. So a whole lot of knowledge and expertise was effectively lost forever and never came back.

At least over the past few years, people were staying healthier longer. That trend has sharply reversed in 2020 and may continue to trend downward for the next 30 years.

So while some of us from the mid 50s to mid 70s may enjoy a long healthy remaining life, a lot of the 30-somethings and 20-somethings of today are likely to have a far lower life expectancy and may develop all sorts of debilitating ailments a good decade younger than many of us old geezers.

Then at the same time, many of them are also losing at least a decade at the front end between student loans and struggling to launch a real career, so they are facing about 20 years of less productivity than their parents are enjoying.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Feb-13

Yes, that is true, some jobs and industries will become obsolete.   I hope restaurants don’t.  People need dining options.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Feb-13

Not if the government forgives all student loan debt.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Feb-15

$1,661.87 in cats (ROCKETMAN_S) said...

Industries that depend on large numbers of people in close proximity to one another for many hours at a time - things like indoor professional sports, things like cozy bars, places like cruise ships, may only come back as a shadow of their former selves.

Athletic facilities, dance studios, bowling alleys, indoor tennis/other sports, swimming pools, saunas, gambling joints, drinking establishments, large indoor restaurants, yoga or other fitness classes, auditoriums, stadiums, museums, entertainment parks, circuses, auditoriums, comedian/opera/band performance stages, billiard halls, game centers, large aquariums,  live houses, etc.

The list is really endless!

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Feb-15

They can’t keep all those businesses closed indefinitely. Whether people will pay to spend time in crowded places is another thing. Many may fail due to fear of crowded spaces people developed due to Covid.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Feb-16

Showtalk said...

They can’t keep all those businesses closed indefinitely. Whether people will pay to spend time in crowded places is another thing. Many may fail due to fear of crowded spaces people developed due to Covid.

The death rate of COVID-19 is less than 2%. That means that more than 98% will survive if they get it.

The lockdown deaths from suicide by out of work unemployed and others feeling depression from the lockdowns are probably greater than the actual COVID deaths.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Feb-16

I’ve heard from parents with high schoolers that the threat of suicide is higher than ever.  Although I just heard from a local woman who nearly died from Covid. She is 70+, probably got it from a family member, was hospitalized and ended up with serious pneumonia.  They were going to vent her and even said in the hallway not quite out of her hearing they would be surprised if she made it through the night.  She turned down the vent, said she would rather die breathing on her own, then somehow turned the corner that night and lived. She’s home but has no bodily strength and is slowly building it back up. She may never be the same.  I’m younger but still, if offered the vaccine I’m going to take it.  Too many people are getting extremely ill, and while they are surviving, their quality of life is not the same as it was.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Feb-17

Japan just received their first batch of vaccinations the end of last week and today, the first 12 doctors and nurses got their 1st shots. Japan will continue to give more and more hospital staff the vaccination throughout the end of February.

Then from March onward, they will start offering it to those over 65 first on a volunteer basis and then scale down the age over time.

They did mention that they will not be administering the vaccination to those 16 years of age or younger!

My Dad is 90, my wife is 68, I'll be 63 next month and my brother is 61. None of us plan on getting the vaccination at all.

The last influenza shot I got was 39 years ago when I got out of the Navy because it was required. Since then, I've received no influenza shots what so ever. And I've never gotten influenza either in those last 39 years.

On the other hand, a company I was outsourced to for 8.5 years had a director who got influenza shots every year. And during my 8.5 years there, he got influenza 3 times. Others in that company also got influenza shots every year and got influenza once or twice each! So go figure!

FWIW

 

Right now, most of the restaurants are dark due to no electricity and everything freezing up.

TOP