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Do you believe in school choice?   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started Sep-9 by Showtalk; 9581 views.
Showtalk said:

Schools have one job, to teach children.

That was probably true at least through the 1970s or so.

By the 1990s, they had morphed into an indoctrination tool to ensure kids were politically correct (the Oldspeak term - the Newspeak term is Woke) and bubble wrapped and protected from anything that might upset them.

Meanwhile, dystopian implementations are expensive. So they raised taxes to pay for the rising tsunami of layers of bureaucrats as they transformed schools from places to learn (and even to socialize) into medium security prisons where kids are conditioned to toe the Party line, backed up with the Thought Police to properly punish those who engaged in wrongthink.

Mere survival in such an environment naturally re-wires the brain in ways that are not conducive to how a healthy civilization can function. So they have been turning out dysfunctional young adults who were conditioned to be afraid of their own shadow, where hurting someone's feelings was labeled as heinous of an offense as arson or murder.

With this nonsense having gone on for a couple of generations now, it's no wonder that most US educated kids are barely surviving as adults and taking an extra decade to reach the milestones most of my generation reached when we grew up.

Just about everyone I know under the age of 40 who is actually succeeding in life are first and 2nd generation immigrants from places like India and Latin America and a few places on the African continent.

Why? Picture the brain like a computer. Every bit of wokeness and indoctrination compliance is like a bunch of open browser tabs and apps running in the background, all of which are competing for limited resources to display assorted content. The main functions bog down, where basic cognition seems to be unusually slow. Their processing system is effectively maxed out just trying to avoid saying the wrong thing that can get them canceled. That is the US educated young adult these days.

Now, someone who grew up in, say, India, had a far less complex (although strange to us) cultural set of rules that aren't incumbered by much of the constantly changing stuff we have to deal with here. Thus they have more brain power available to, say, learn engineering, I.T., or medicine.

They can do that because they could often focus on those skills. They didn't have to deal with the Thought Police, and as kids were allowed to be kids. All of this freedom from the US school system top-heavy bureaucracy gave them enough breathing room to truly excel.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Sep-26

We tend to hear about those who fall,apart, but there are millions of adults who got through the school system and are doing well.  I only have one friend whose adult child is living literally in her “basement.”  Actually their whole family lives with her.  That is mainly because they made poor career choices, not due to education.  They ended up in hospitality careers that were wiped out by Covid.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Oct-2

Showtalk said...

Minority parents support school choice.  Not all public schools are good schools, and many parents want other options.

And it looks like they're getting more options...

A State-level analysis of public charter school and district public school trends.
 
Sept. 2021
 
Based on data collected and analyzed by the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools, during the first full school year of the COVID pandemic, the charter sector is likely to have experienced the largest rate of increase in student enrollment increase in half a decade. 
 
Public charter school enrollment increased during the 2020-21 school year in at least 39 states, the only segment of the public education sector to grow during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to new data compiled by the National Alliance. All told, nearly 240,000 new students enrolled in charter schools during that period, a 7% year-over-year increase. This likely represents more than double the rate of growth from the prior year. According to the analysis of data from 42 states*, Illinois, Iowa and Wyoming are the only states that saw even a modest decrease in charter school enrollment during this period. This report does not include data from Kansas, Tennessee, Puerto Rico, Guam, or any states that do not have public charter schools.
 
Across the country, families chose to leave their district schools in record-high numbers and polling from parents suggests this wasn’t a temporary change. According to National Parents Union, 80% of the parents they surveyed said the 2020-21 school year was an eye-opening experience that also resulted in a demonstrable shift in parental involvement when it comes to their child’s education and parents’ desire to engage schools with more input and feedback. A majority of parents want more options for their students following the pandemic and they have no plans to return to the way things were.1
 
Charter schools are public schools of choice—meaning families must make an active decision to enroll a student in one of these unique public schools. During the 2020 school year, the COVID pandemic forced many schools of all types to close their doors and switch to remote learning. Many parents were dissatisfied with the quality of what was available to their children. And that dissatisfaction led them to learn more about the other educational options available. For many families, charter schools’ nimbleness and flexibility made them the right public school choice.
 
Of course, not all students left their district public schools for charter schools. Many families chose home schooling. In fact, a July 2021 article from the Associated Press examining homeschooling data from the U.S. Census Bureau noted that from March 2020 to September 2020 rates of homeschooling increased from 5.4% to 11%.2 Some families chose to delay the start of preschool or kindergarten. Others decided to enroll their students in private schools. The reasons vary from family to family. But the unmistakable message is that something wasn’t working for more than one million parents. They voted with their feet and chose options that are a better fit for their children. 
 
In June 2021, the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics reported that enrollment in public schools “fell by its largest margin in at least two decades,” an overall drop that equates to about a 3% loss in enrollment from 2019-20 to 2020-21.3
 
reached out to 51 state departments of education and found that every state saw a drop in enrollment, totaling a public school loss of 1.4 million students.4
 
 
FWIW
In reply toRe: msg 71
Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints) 

Oct-2

My two kids went to school in Colorado and Arizona and we had a choice of schools in both states.  For awhile in Co either choice would bus, but the last year we lived there only one of the two choices offered bussing.  In Arizona we had the same experience both schools would bus but my daughters senior year her school stopped busing, so she drove and the following year my sons school stopped bussing so I had to take off work early two days a week to pick him up.  The other three days he had after school activities so I didn't have to take off early.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Oct-2

That’s a good sign. Public schools need competition.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Oct-2

There is nothing better than a good public school but sadly few are good anymore.

Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints) 

Oct-2

When I was in high school, granted a small farm school,  it even into college the teachers acted in concert.  If my government teacher required a paper on the effects of prohibition, the English teacher would grade it for spelling and grammar. Then the social studies teacher graded it for content, presentation and accuracy.  So almost every paper I submitted received two grades...B/A as an example.  The first grade B was from the assigning teacher the A would be from the English or reviewing teacher.  This system was used in most classes except math and some science classes.  A nightmare day was a paper required from the psychology teacher to be graded by both teachers.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Oct-2

Why don’t they do that today?  My personal experiences with modern public schools was horrible.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Oct-2

I think this trend will continue in the future too.

Many parents are fed up with the public school system.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Oct-2

The mask thing has really upset them, especially parents with little children. And vaccines. Children don’t need them.

  • Edited October 2, 2021 9:08 pm  by  Showtalk
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