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Have you ever used a manual typewrite...   The Real You: Personality Poll

Started Dec-3 by WALTER784; 1974 views.
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jan-7

See! You keyboard faster than you type.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Jan-7

Most of them are stupid.  Other than hacker types.

Risa (Risa25)

From: Risa (Risa25) 

Jan-7

We need the hacker types on our side; they're scary smart. 

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Jan-7

Risa (Risa25) said...

I know there's a way to follow every keystroke on a computer, but reading used carbon ribbons sounds easier than retrieving deleted computer files

I'm retired now, but worked in the computer, network and security arena for close to 40 years.

And retrieving deleted computer files is actually quite easy unless they've used a tool like bleach bit which makes data virtually unrecoverable.

It's easy because when you delete a file, you think the file is deleted, but the file itself is still on the disk, the index pointer to that file is the only thing deleted. And without the index file, it won't show up as an available file, but the actual data has not been erased.

So there are two ways to retrieve that data: If it was recently deleted, all you need to do is recreate that index pointer and point it to the right start point on the disk and you can easily see it. But if it was deleted quite a while ago, other files may have been written over parts of where that deleted files data still resided. In that case, you need a special tool to pick up the bits and pieces which haven't yet been over written, but you'll end up with only a partial file and not the complete one. Depending on how much is remaining, you might be able to figure out what the over written portion was. But they all have special tools to retrieve that data.

FWIW

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Jan-7

Showtalk said...

See! You keyboard faster than you type.

Well, I thought I might be faster... maybe 100WPM, but I never expected it to be that high.

As for the 98% accuracy, back when I was in the Navy, we had to type encrypted data with a 98% or better accuracy on a teletype machine. Speed wasn't an issue, it was accuracy.

Typing things like: S( URAPD LQP8 V2M T, RP1Z DLE5

Teletype machines didn't have upper and lower case... they only used upper case letters.

FWIW

 

Risa (Risa25)

From: Risa (Risa25) 

Jan-7

I do know that deleting a file doesn't mean it's really deleted, and that files can be written over, but didn't know about bleach kits.  The only way I knew to completely make data irretrievable was what I did with my first hard drive--I froze it solid, hammered it into pieces, and buried the pieces in my garden.  I don't think there's anything on this drive I wouldn't want retrieved lol. 

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Jan-7

Well, Bleach Bit... not Kit doesn't actually use bleach either... it's a software tool used to entirely delete your files so that the data is irrecoverable.

Hillary Clinton used it on her server after she deleted the 33,000 files she said were her personal E-mails.

It discovers deleted data on your machine and replaces it with 10101010 and then goes back and changes that to 01010101 several times. So by the time it's finished deleting your supposedly deleted data, every single bit of that data has been written over and over and over with a 1 first then a 0 then a 1 again and then a 0 I think for up to 10 or perhaps even more times. (Bottom line: There will be nothing to retrieve that's useful.) You can download it for free too:

Clean Your System and Free Disk Space | BleachBit

FWIW

 

Risa (Risa25)

From: Risa (Risa25) 

Jan-7

I saw a teletype machine once, in the university library's basement...how did those things work?

Risa (Risa25)

From: Risa (Risa25) 

Jan-7

Didn't think it was actual bleach that would really eff up the hardware...and I did know that computers are binary (0 and 1) so that makes sense, if you just write over it backward and forward over and over, eventually it won't be legible, so to speak. 

I don't think I need to download it but thanks anyway--all I do on this computer is run my website, send a few emails, share cat pictures, check the news...I live such a boring life these days lol

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Jan-8

Well, there is another little trick that's not quite as good as Bleach Bit, but is better than just hitting the delete button to delete a file.

Press down the Shift key as you hit the Delete button.

When you just hit the delete button, your file gets moved into the trash bin and stays there (so that you can recover it if you want) until you empty the recycle bin. Once you've emptied the recycle bin, the data is still on the disk, but those portions of the disk are then marked as rewriteable.

But when you hold the Shift button down while pressing the Delete button, it doesn't move it to the recycle bin and just immediately marks it as rewriteable.

So it still can be recovered, but it's chances of getting rewritten over by another file are greater by holding down the shift key before pressing delete.

FWIW

  • Edited January 8, 2022 1:42 am  by  WALTER784
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