Opinion Polls: Delphi's Polling Place

Hosted by Showtalk

Opinion polls on all subjects. Opinions? Heck yes, we have opinions - but we're *always* nice about it, even when ours are diametrically opposed to yours. Register your vote today!

  • 4627
    MEMBERS
  • 104350
    MESSAGES
  • 72
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

Can cruise ship drownings be prevented?   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started 12/12/21 by Showtalk; 2325 views.
Showtalk

Poll Question From Showtalk

12/12/21

Can cruise ship drownings be prevented?
  • No, they are all suicides or murders1  vote
    6%
  • Not likely as there is always a place where someone can go overboard8  votes
    53%
  • Yes, it's possible to prevent access to places where passengers can go overbo...1  vote
    6%
  • I don't know, I've never been on a cruise ship4  votes
    26%
  • I don't know0  votes
    0%
  • Other1  vote
    6%
No, they are all suicides or murders 
Not likely as there is always a place where someone can go overboard 
Yes, it's possible to prevent access to places where passengers can go overbo... 
I don't know, I've never been on a cruise ship 
I don't know 
Other 
In reply toRe: msg 1
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

12/12/21

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

12/13/21

Accidental slip and fall over board are very rare.

Being blown overboard by a strong gust of wind are probably greater.

Suicide or murder rank much much higher on the scale.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

12/13/21

Being thrown over is even worse.  It sounds like they think it’s a homicide.

WALTER784 said:

Accidental slip and fall over board are very rare. Being blown overboard by a strong gust of wind are probably greater. Suicide or murder rank much much higher on the scale.

Yep. However accidental fall overboard cases, likely have alcohol involved. I read of at least one person who was drunk as a skunk and evidently wanted to replicate that Titanic scene on a balcony railing. And he lost his balance, hitting the water like a big 300 pound toad.

The real surprise was that he actually survived with far fewer injuries than one would have expected. Mostly it was because someone saw him fall, marked the position immediately with a GPS and sprinted for the bridge. They actually were able to turn the ship around and find him bobbing in the waves and effect a rescue - or another ship in the area did.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

12/13/21

$1,661.87 in cats (ROCKETMAN_S) said...

The real surprise was that he actually survived with far fewer injuries than one would have expected.

Probably because he was drunk and his body and muscles were so relaxed and limber due to the booze.

I jumped from the deck of a Guided Missile Cruiser 35' above the water when we were right over the equator in the Pacific Ocean. They instructed us how to jump off properly from such a height without breaking any bones.

You wrap your arms around your chest (right hand over left chest and vice versa), then you cross your feet at the ankles after you jump off so that you hit the water feet first.

Cruise ships are probably much higher from the surface of the water.

FWIW

  • Edited December 13, 2021 11:00 pm  by  WALTER784
WALTER784 said:

Probably because he was drunk and his body and muscles were so relaxed and limber due to the booze.

I think I remember reading that he was "quite inebriated". He probably didn't drown due to the buoyancy of all the excess body fat, especially belly fat, so after he hit the water, he popped back up to the surface like a huge cork made of lard, and somehow ended up nose and mouth facing upward so he didn't inhale water in his semi-conscious state.

WALTER784 said:

I jumped from the deck of a Guided Missile Cruiser 35' above the water when we were right over the equator in the Pacific Ocean. They instructed us how to jump off properly from such a height without breaking any bones.

Was it some kind of ritual? kind of like the one at the South Pole where people get in a sauna cranked up to 200 degrees F, dash out of the shelter buck nekkid when the ambient temperature is -100F, run around the south pole marker, and get back inside before they freeze to get initiated into the "300 club" because they have a 300 degree temperature transition.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

12/19/21

$1,661.87 in cats (ROCKETMAN_S) said...

Was it some kind of ritual? kind of like the one at the South Pole where people get in a sauna cranked up to 200 degrees F, dash out of the shelter buck nekkid when the ambient temperature is -100F, run around the south pole marker, and get back inside before they freeze to get initiated into the "300 club" because they have a 300 degree temperature transition.

The ritual was actually before that dive. We dove in after the ritual was over.

The ritual is called line-crossing ceremony and it goes back hundreds of years. You have King Neptune (Captain of the ship) & Davy Jones (the XO) dressed to the max. Today's line crossing ceremony is too mild compared to the one I went through... the one I went through in 1977 would be considered hazing today. Before you cross the equator onboard ship you're a pollywog... then you go through the ceremony at the equator and get promoted to a shellback (one who have crossed the equator). 

Crossing the Line (navy.mil)

After the ceremony/ritual, everybody who wants can jump into the water right at the equator. And it's quite interesting too. There are no sharks in the area, there are no waves in the area, the ocean looks like one very large mirror as far as you can see with your eyes, and the water is quite warm because you're right at the equator.

FWIW

 

  • Edited December 19, 2021 4:17 am  by  WALTER784

That's cool. Us landlubbers who have either never seen an ocean in their lives, or only seen glimpses of it from 37,000 feet through a tiny window in a pressurized tube traveling mach 0.85 over the shoulder of some snoring stranger in the next seat, generally find all sorts of tales of the sea to be fascinating but as alien to our life experience as tales of swashbuckling adventurers long long ago in a galaxy far, far away.

Although admittedly I did actually make physical contact with the Atlantic Ocean for about 15 minutes one late April afternoon in 1989, and only then because some snafu down in South Florida went off script during a 72 hour stay, and I found myself with a couple of actual unscheduled and unplanned hours on a busy itenerary.

Having driven the entire 1,783 miles to reach the location, I actually did see some bits of salt water along nearly half of the journey - such as the exit from the tunnel and a few miles over the Mobile Bay Bridge along I-10 while seeing the USS Alabama anchored in the distance.

So I had a spare pair of shorts in the truck, and with nothing to do for about 3.5 hours that had previously been meticulously planned, I just drove the few blocks to a beach - don't even remember which one it was, where there was parking and no obvious restrictions, put on my flip-flops, grabbed an empty canteen as almost an afterthought, and waded far enough into the gentle surf to actually achieve buoyancy and discovered that the salinity really wasn't as irritating to opening my eyes underwater as a chlorine laden swimming pool.

Then about 30 feet out, I opened the lid on the canteen, held it under, and let it fill with sea water and cap it. I still have that canteen full of sea water, still sealed, sitting on a shelf as a kind of once in a lifetime souvenir.

There was some trash and debris in the water, and I spotted a roughly 9 foot long piece of rough cut lumber around 100 feet from shore, about 4 inches x 4 inches cross section, some kind of wood that didn't look like something you could normally buy in a home improvement store.

So I grabbed hold of that piece of lumber in a rescue grasp, rolled over and swam back to the beach with the thing in tow.

The people I was with thought I was kind of weird, but I wrestled the prize out of the water, carried it to the truck, and put it in the back. It just barely fit in the bed of the truck diagonally, and it stayed there al the way home, where some 1,783 miles by road from where it had been fished out of the ocean, and 2,818 feet higher in elevation, it still sits to this day - after a brief weekend trip a couple of days later to an elevation of 9,600 feet MSL into a late spring mountain snowstorm to the parking lot of a ski resort in New Mexico.

After coming back from there, and it riding around on a couple of commutes to work afterwards, was when it finally got unloaded so it really was hauled more like 2,500 miles before being placed at its final resting place. Now it's kind of lost among other stacks of wood and metal material collected or salvaged over the years, and it's anyone's guess where that stick of lumber traveled from before I encountered it by chance about to wash ashore in south Florida in that lull after Spring Break but before schools let out for the summer.

Whatever species it is, it isn't pine or spruce or cedar - none of the kind normally sourced from the Canadian forests that go into nearly all wood frame construction in the US.

Anyway, having most of my mental perception of Miami and surrounds shaped by episodes of Miami Vice, I was almost disappointed to not have found a tightly wrapped bundle of cocaine or the corpse of an informant bobbing in the waves.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

12/24/21

I was born and raised in Central Florida. Went surfing at New Smyrna beach (just south of Daytona Beach) on the Atlantic coast every weekend. Took several deep sea fishing excursions and brought back a large blue marlin and numerous other fish.

While I was stationed in San Diego for Radioman A School training, I went down to La Jolla beach on the Pacific coast a couple of times.

Then they sent me to Norfolk, N.C. for satellite tracking schooling and I went to Willoughby Beach on the Atlantic coast again.

In Japan, I went to numerous beaches in most of the ports my ship was berthed at on both the Pacific coast and the Sea of Japan coast. Went to Pattaya Beach in Thailand more than just a few times on the Pacific coast.

And for the last 3.4 years of my 4 year tour in the Navy, I spent onboard ship living on the Pacific Ocean somewhere between Japan and Australia daily. 

And now, I live just a 10 minute drive from the Pacific ocean about 60 kilometers north of Tokyo so go surfing and deep sea fishing all the time.

So I guess you landlubbers who live too far to to get to the ocean quickly, a visit to even the Gulf of Mexico would be a real treat.

For me... I can't stay away from the ocean. 

FWIW

TOP