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What do you think about the Biden’s new puppy and rehoming Major?   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started 12/21/21 by Showtalk; 7325 views.
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

1/2/22

The GSD rescues here will only take a dog from a shelter or an owner.  They will not take a found dog.  Here’s the shelters call the rescue groups when they get a purebred so they are never available from shelters, only from rescues. Is each state diferent?

selzer

From: selzer 

1/2/22

I think each state is different, or it is up to the states, for publicly-funded shelters.  Like our state revised code requires a dog to be held so many days, I think three, unless it is an owner turn-in, or if they can find a license on the dog it is two weeks.  Since our county does not have a government run shelter, they have to pay to board dogs in the privately run shelter.  

I don't wear collars on my dogs, dangerous.  Some are chipped, some are not.  But a shelter is not required to look for or call you if they find a chip, only the license.  If your dog is chipped and you find the dog, I think you can prove ownership by the chip and get your dog back in most instances, but the shelter does not have to look for or honor the chip.   It's weird.  I think it could be done better.  

Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints) 

1/2/22

Just a note...we have two American Aussies.  Both are kid loving, friendly take me home with you beauties.  Their ID tags both read "Dogs name, home phone, cellphone and in caps CHIPPED".  The reasoning I used for that was "Chipped" tells an honest finder to take our pup to the nearest vet for ID:  the second was that maybe a not so honest person wouldn't want to risk taking a chipped dog to a vet...so they won't take them.

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

1/2/22

Here, the hold period is six days but if shelters think there is no owner they can release a dog after 72 hrs. They can also neuter an intact dog without the owner’s permission.  So you might get your breeding dog back sterilized.  

selzer

From: selzer 

1/2/22

The beauty of living in a poor, rural county, with no government shelters, and only a privately run shelter with very limited funding is that it is unlikely they can speuter my breeding dogs.  But I am doing my best to ensure they are never in that position.  

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

1/3/22

If your dogs are not loose you don’t have to worry about it.

selzer

From: selzer 

1/3/22

Right, this is why I put up my kennels and fenced them around.  Now I have some kennels in the front that are not fenced around, but so far we've been good.  The one with dogs in it is concrete and six feet.  There is always a possibility that the house burns down or a tree falls onto the kennel and my dogs are suddenly loose.  It hasn't happened since I put up the kennels, not that it cannot.  But if my dogs do land in the shelter, it is unlikely they would be speutered before I could get them back. 

I lost my Arwen about 20 years ago.  I had a crappy cheap chain-link kennel that I made in the back yard and I lost her when she squeezed out on Christmas day.  She was gone for 19 days in -10F weather.  It was the worst time of my life.  I got her back.  Since then, none of my dogs were running loose, when I wasn't right there with them.  

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

1/4/22

How did you find Arwen? My dogs escaped a few times but I found them right away.  

selzer

From: selzer 

1/6/22

When I got home Christmas night, I saw that she was gone, and I called my dad and he and my sister and I all went around looking and calling for her.  My dad talked to the Amish fellow and he said he saw her around 3pm down by his house and 6pm down by his folks on the other side of me, but much further down.  It was ten below and we finally went back home.  

My little sister made up fliers with her picture, and I put them everywhere, stores and vet offices in my neighborhood.  I went to the shelter every day, and then every other day when I got back to work.  Never expect them to know what a particular breed looks like.  I would come in and ask if they got in any more shepherds, and they would say no, and I would go and look and there would be 1 or 2 more.   I put an ad in our Newspaper.  I followed every tip, driving down snow covered roads in the bitter cold with my windows open, creeping along, whistling and hollering.  

On January 13, I called in to work because I was physically ill all night again.  I couldn't stop throwing up.  I didn't know if she was dead in a ditch or starving somewhere or caught in a trap.  I was at my mom's when the phone rang.  I answered it and it was someone in the next county thinking they may have found her.  It was about 40 miles away, and I had little hope.  But I got in the car and drove out there.  It was up on Lake Erie in some cabins.  

I pulled up to the address and no one answered.  There were some woods there.  I was just about to get in my car and drive away, when a man in a pickup pulled in and asked if I was looking for the dog.  I said yes.  I was in my early 30s and he seemed to be in his later 50s or sixties.  He said, let's go for a walk, and headed into the woods.  I headed into the woods with him.  I think back on that now, and know I would do it the same, but it is scary all the same.  

I heard her tags, and when I saw her, I couldn't believe it was her.  She was making a high pitched bark I never heard before out of her.  She was barreling at me.  The man said, "there's no doubt in my mind."  It was her.  It was the best day of my life.  They told me she wouldn't let anyone near her, and the dog warden tried twice, but couldn't catch her.  They put a box up under the porch and she was sleeping there for about a week, they were feeding her.  She was skinny.  They gave me the food and I held her all the way home.  She lay her head on my leg and cried all the way home.  

Arwen went up to both the man and the woman and the lady (who was in the cabin) said to her, "if you let us do that a week ago, you'd be home now."  They told me that another lady came to look at her, but said she wasn't her dog, but a lady in Ashtabula County was looking for her dog.  So they called their friends in Ashtabula County where my ad was, and they pulled out their newspaper and found my number.  

I stopped at my parents' house and when my little sister came in, she was lying behind me in the kitchen, so I asked my sister to get me a plate out of the cupboard behind me.  She looked at me like I had two head, but walked over there to get it for me and she saw her.  

A month later, on Valentines Day, I got two dozen carnations and a card and put some money in it and drove it over there with Arwen.  They opened the card and ran out and gave me the money back.  I said, that I put a reward in the paper and never thought of it, and said they had to call long distance and bought her food and everything.   They said the flowers and the card were enough and if you couldn't do something nice for someone, then why are we here.  

In the card, I had said that they gave me my best buddy back.  It was true, and Arwen got her best buddy back too.  There is a song, Mr. Bojangles, that talks about how the dog up and died, and after 20 years he still grieves.  I know that.  I think about Arwen pretty much every day.  It isn't all sad, some of those memories make me smile.  I see her in her progeny, I think about all the stories, all the training, all the kool stuff we did together.  I think about how my parents did not like her name, but she grew into that name and made it, well, everyone that met Arwen loved her.  

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

1/6/22

That is a beautiful story with a happy ending.  Do you know how she got so far? Did someone pick her up and then dump her?  You were lucky to find her and get her back.  

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