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Gerrymander Panic   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started Jan-20 by WALTER784; 4038 views.
WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

May-27

This is interesting news about gerrymandering...

Historic Judicial Watch Gerrymander Win Could Set National Precedent

MAY 16, 2022

The judge was not pulling any punches. Siding with Judicial Watch in a challenge to a congressional redistricting plan cooked up by Democrats dominating the Maryland state legislature, Judge Lynne Battaglia—herself a Democrat—threw haymakers. The Democrat redistricting map was an “extreme partisan gerrymander.” Democrats had attempted to “suppress the voice of Republican voters.” It was drawn up with “partisanship as predominant intent.” It violated state constitutional provisions on equal protection and free speech. It subordinated “constitutional criteria to political consideration.”

It was out. Making history—for the first time, a Maryland court ruled that a congressional redistricting plan violated the state constitution—Judge Battaglia banned the use of the gerrymander map and ordered the Maryland General Assembly back to the drawing board.

Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton hailed the decision. “This key court victory against abusive partisan gerrymandering by Democrats in Maryland could set a national precedent,” he said. Maryland Governor Larry Hogan called it “an historic milestone.”

Judicial Watch filed the lawsuit on behalf of twelve Maryland voters who objected to the state legislature’s plan and was joined at trial by a second set of plaintiffs. The argument? The gerrymandered maps diminished their right to participate in a free and fair election on an equal basis with other Maryland voters. The court agreed.

The March ruling has begun to echo through the national debate. In New York, in April, the state’s highest court rejected a new redistricting map favored by Democrats dominating state politics. The court ruled that the map violated a state prohibition on partisan gerrymandering, saying it was created with “impermissible partisan purpose.” Court observers say the Maryland case was discussed in briefings and oral arguments in New York.

In 2019, the Supreme Court rejected political gerrymandering claims brought solely under the federal Constitution. Since then, the battle over redistricting has spread to state courts throughout the country. According to experts surveyed by Judicial Watch, cases related to gerrymandering and redistricting are underway in nineteen states. Among the states are the electoral powerhouses Texas, Florida, Georgia, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Ohio. You can read about some of the upcoming cases here.

Tough anti-gerrymandering measures are one way to start cleaning up dirty election practices, says Robert Popper, Judicial Watch’s director of voting integrity efforts. Gerrymandering is a “method of cheating [that] has been around for 200 years,” Popper told journalist Tim Pool. “If you’re a state that doesn’t have an anti-gerrymandering provision, then suddenly it’s a political issue. Why don’t you? You want districts that are ugly and screwed up for partisan advantage, you want to cheat opponents in state elections.”

In Maryland, the state legislature quickly capitulated in the face of the court ruling and signed on to a new, fairer redistricting map. In New York, redistricting has been turned over to a special master. But Popper warns of trouble in states where political gerrymandering survives, with partisan operatives possibly turning to “new, computer-generated maps” that could become “so convoluted that’s it’s effectively like you don’t have a district at all.” We’re not there yet, says Popper. “But if we don’t deal with gerrymandering, my prediction is, that’s coming.”

***

Micah Morrison is chief investigative reporter for Judicial Watch. Follow him on Twitter @micah_morrison. Tips: mmorrison@judicialwatch.org

Investigative Bulletin is published by Judicial Watch. Reprints and media inquiries: jfarrell@judicialwatch.org

Historic Judicial Watch Gerrymander Win Could Set National Precedent | Judicial Watch

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

May-27

Another necessary clean up. For years the narrative was that it’s a Republican situation. Recently it’s become apparent both sides do it but the Democrats have not been challenged before.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

May-27

Showtalk said...

For years the narrative was that it’s a Republican situation. Recently it’s become apparent both sides do it but the Democrats have not been challenged before.

ROFLMAO...

That reminds me of the Palestinian Hamas (Democrats) vs Israel (Republicans)...

Hamas would unprovokedly send a suicide bomber into a restaurant or bus to blow up Israeli citizens. Then Israel would strike back. Inside of Palestine, the news was that the Israeli strike was unprovoked when in fact it was just retaliatory for the suicide bombing. Over 95% of Israeli strikes on Palestine territory are retaliatory.

Now, let's reword the above...

Democrats would unprovokedly gerrymander up Republican districts. Then the Republican would gerrymander back. Inside of the liberal world, the news was that the Republican gerrymandering was unfair when in fact it was just retaliatory for the years of Democrat gerrymandering. Over 95% of Republican gerrymandering on Democrat territory are retaliatory.

Go figure.

FWIW

 

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

May-29

That is a good semantic explanation!

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Jun-5

Here is another gerrymandering loss for the Democrats... I wonder how many liberal news media ran this story? Probably none!

Court-Ordered New York Redistricting Map Is Lights out for Democrats

By Bonchie
May 16, 2022 2:15 PM ET

While it’s been clear for a few weeks that Republicans have come out on top regarding redistricting for the coming mid-terms, there was one final piece of the puzzle left. That piece has now fallen into place.
 
A court-ordered map in New York has been adopted, and it’s lights out for Democrats heading into November. While the original Democrat map, which was struck down by the state’s Supreme Court, had a likely outcome of 22 D-seats to 4-R seats, the new map puts as many as 12 seats in play for the GOP.
 
Republicans were looking at a modest 1-3 seat gain via redistricting after Ron DeSantis worked his magic in Florida (there’s a single district there under dispute, but nothing that can change the game). Now, you could be talking about a 5-8 seat gain just by virtue of the lines that have been drawn across the nation. Democrats who were celebrating a month ago at some earlier court victories have had their hopes of stemming the tide crushed.
 
One of the things the New York map fixed was an illegal gerrymander in New York City that diluted the voting power of Orthodox Jews, a demographic that leans heavily Republican. That’s left Rep. Jerry Nadler, who would retire if he had any sense given his age and health concerns, in the same district as another Democrat. Elsewhere, Republicans are set up to make headway in what should be a wave year for them.
 
In the end, the dynamics of the coming election don’t change much, but if 2020 taught us anything, it’s that every seat counts in future elections. Democrats went from a large majority to only holding the house by five seats in a single cycle. So while Republicans are going to gain a lot of seats this year, having more room for error in 2024 and 2026 could be the difference between keeping control and losing it.
 
Anyway, let the rage ensue. Democrats are already throwing a fit on social media over the New York map, and there’s a lot of crying left to do.

Court-Ordered New York Redistricting Map Is Lights out for Democrats – RedState

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jun-5

That should be handled in every state.  Mine has been so gerrymandered, I don’t even know who most of the candidates are.  A few have Dems who are rubber stamped into office. I recognize their names.  But most candidates don’t even send out campaign mailers anymore or run ads.

MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad

Jun-19

You might be interested in this article which shows how each state does the redistricting.

HIGHLIGHTS
  • Congressional redistricting: In 33 states, state legislatures play the dominant role in congressional redistricting. In eight states, commissions draw congressional district lines. In two states, hybrid systems are used, in which the legislatures share redistricting authority with commissions. The remaining states comprise one congressional district each, rendering redistricting unnecessary.
  • State legislative redistricting: In 33 states, state legislatures play the dominant role in state legislative redistricting. Commissions draw state legislative district lines in 14 states. In three states, hybrid systems are used.

The states themselves determine their own redistricting methods. These methods vary from state to state and, sometimes, within a state (for example, different methods may apply to congressional redistricting than to state legislative redistricting). This article details redistricting methods by state for both congressional and state legislative redistricting

https://ballotpedia.org/State-by-state_redistricting_procedures

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