Opinion Polls: Delphi's Polling Place

Hosted by Showtalk

Opinion polls on all subjects. Opinions? Heck yes, we have opinions - but we're *always* nice about it, even when ours are diametrically opposed to yours. Register your vote today!

  • 4642
    MEMBERS
  • 104877
    MESSAGES
  • 5
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

The impossible dovetail cutting board   The Pleasure Seeking You: Entertainment & Sports

Started May-14 by WALTER784; 210 views.
WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

May-14

This one is specifically for you... because you will probably enjoy it the most...

It's quite facinating to say the least!

Building an Impossible Dovetail Cutting Board

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

May-15

That is very cool.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

May-15

Yep... he took the 4 corner dovetail to a new extreme! And it's quite unique too!

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

May-15

That takes a lot of equipment and expertise.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

May-15

Yes it does... not to mention... imagination!

FWIW

in the file stragglers.txt insert the following line:

https://youtu.be/JhNoxW2yapA

Do this in the directory you plan to put such videos in. Add any other URLs of videos you want to do as a batch. Be sure the final  line is terminated with <cr>

From most Linux flavor boxes, first navigate to a directory you want to put youtube videos into.

If not sure you have youtube-dl installed,

sudo apt-get install youtube-dl

from that directory

/usr/bin/youtube-dl --restrict-filename -f18 -ciwo "%(title)s_%(id)s.%(ext)s" --batch-file 'stragglers.txt' >> 'stragglers_txt.raw' 2>&1

Now you have your command prompt back. To watch the progress from either local or ssh into the machine remotely , issue the command

tail -f stragglers.txt

(the whole above process is really best for a remote server or seedbox connected to a fast, un-throttled connection and / or it might be at the far end of a VPN)

To exit the tail command, simply press <ctrl>C. Multiple login sessions from multiple locations can simultaneously use this to view progress of almost anything.

When the video list is complete, you can append to a log manually (I have a shell script that does this), by doing

cat 'stragglers_txt.raw' | grep -v ' ETA' >> 'Video_list.log'

To watch, many default viewers lack the codecs to process these files. On a Linux box, just

sudo apt-get install vlc

Everyone should be running VLC player to watch videos. It digests just about every known video and audio format out there. No muss, no fuss, no DRM [male bovine excrement].

For Windows systems, you can also use youtube-dl from the command prompt to download a list of videos. You can also install VLC on a Windows box. I strongly recommend everyone who does any serious video watching to do this. It gives you a lot more control and versatility, and it's a plain honest open source project - none of that nag-ware or crippleware bait and switch stuff that makes you spend a bunch of money after a day or two.

Windows is the OS most often targeted with offers for crappy, spammy type media players (and recorders).

Oh, another open source tool - install Audacity - it will actually open a video file and automagically extract the audio tracks for editing. You can then export and save the audio, after normalizing or doing any other cleanup.

I often fix the audio levels, or normalize (and sometimes compress) them for downloaded videos to keep the audio consistent from video to video in a playlist. Then use ffmpeg to replace the original audio track with my "repaired" one, and then there won't be the need to crank up the volume when someone has a very low level audio, and then the next one blares out 30 decibels louder and all the cats leap 3 feet and run for cover while one tries to quickly turn the volume down.

Eventually I'm going to set up an audio normalizer script that will either boost or fade the audio to a specific average audio level and write a new file with just a couple of mouse clicks or a properly constructed command.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

May-17

For windows, the cdrtfe open source program allows...

cdrtfe supports the following features:

  • Data CDs
  • Audio CDs (including CD-Plus)
  • XCDs (with optional error protection)
  • Video CDs
  • Audio track extraction (wav, mp3, ogg, flac, userdefined)
  • Project files
  • Can be used with commandline options
  • Windows Explorer integration
  • Multi language support
  • DVD support: Data and Video DVDs
  • Remote drive support via RSCSI 

So not only playing videos, but also burning CDs too!

FWIW

TOP