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How George Soros’ billions are remaking   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started Jul-4 by WALTER784; 134 views.
WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Jul-4

How George Soros’ billions are remaking America’s justice system

By Jason Johnson and Sean Kennedy
June 8, 2022 2:42pm

How much exactly does “social justice” cost?
 
Liberal billionaire George Soros spent at least $40 million over the last decade to answer that question, according to our latest research. Those millions helped elect scores of progressive prosecutors bent on remaking the criminal justice system to Soros’ liking.
 
It’s not to Americans’ liking, as San Francisco District Attorney Chesa Boudin’s recall Tuesday shows. Soros didn’t fund Boudin directly, but he donated to an anti-recall PAC. And Boudin is the first face on the “Meet the Movement” page of the Soros-funded Fair and Just Prosecution, whose conferences he’s attended.
 
From 2014 to 2021, Soros’ $40 million in campaign spending helped elect so-called social justice prosecutors across the country while dozens more benefited from the billionaire’s largesse while in office. About 75 Soros-linked district attorneys control the jurisdictions of 72 million Americans — one in five — from Manhattan to Portland, Los Angeles to Philadelphia.
 
And Soros isn’t done yet.
 
Soros contributed to an anti-recall PAC that failed to save ousted San Francisco DA Chesa Boudin.
 
Just this year, Soros has invested even more in DA races in Little Rock, Ark. ($321,000), California’s Contra Costa County ($652,000) and Portland, Maine ($300,000).
 
In Arkansas, the Soros-financed group Justice and Public Safety PAC was the largest independent spender in the state’s May primaries, dropping 10 times as much cash as the campaign of Soros’ preferred candidate, Alicia Walton.
 
While Walton lost in Little Rock, most of Soros’ bets pay dividends. Soros-connected DAs’ powers extend across large swaths of the country including 25 of the 50 largest cities and counties, the quiet suburbs of Washington, DC, and central Wisconsin’s rural farming communities.
 
Across those jurisdictions, these prosecutors are transforming the justice system from within. In the name of reducing perceived inequities, many have unilaterally stopped seeking cash bail, preferring release on recognizance to detention. They refuse to cooperate with immigration authorities, drop felonies down to no-jail misdemeanors and seek lenient sentences for serious (and violent) offenders — often with tragic results.
 
San Antonio DA Joe Gonzales took more than $1.4 million from the exclusively Soros-funded Texas Justice and Public Safety PAC in 2018.
 
Meanwhile, they’ve antagonized law enforcement and alienated their own staffs. Seasoned career prosecutors have been leaving en masse — with 75% to 100% turnover recorded across Soros-linked DAs’ offices from Philadelphia to St. Louis and San Francisco.
 
And those experienced assistant district attorneys are desperately needed as disorder and violent crime soar across America. Although representing only 22% of the country’s population, progressive prosecutors’ offices covered 40% of 2021 homicide cases and a third of all violent crime.
 
The volume and nature of the felony cases under these prosecutors’ supervision mean their policies can and do have consequences for neighboring communities and the nation, as crime often bleeds over county and state lines.
 
In Fairfax, Va., the Soros-funded prosecutor’s leniency abetted murder in the case of a career criminal accused of shooting five homeless men in New York City and Washington, DC, killing two. After breaking into two different Virginia hotels and attempting to abduct and sexually assault a maid, Gerald Brevard faced a sentence of 26 years to life in late 2020. But chief prosecutor Steve Descano cut him a sweetheart deal — dropping the felonies to misdemeanors with only five months behind bars.
 
Soros-funded prosecutor Steve Descano cut a murderer and rapist a sweet deal.
 
In 2019, Descano — with no prior criminal law experience — was vaulted almost single-handedly into office by Soros’ campaign cash. Of the $950,000 in donations candidate Descano received, $659,000 came through two PACs funded either solely or largely by Soros, with another $50,000 coming from groups or individuals closely tied to Soros. That’s $3 out of every $4 linked to a single billionaire’s largesse.
 
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Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jul-5

Judge positions should not be able to be influenced or bought by money or favors.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Jul-5

Should not is correct... but they are.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jul-6

There has always been some corruption but it was isolated.

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Jul-6

Showtalk said...

There has always been some corruption but it was isolated.

I'm not so sure it was so isolated...

There has always been corruption, but probably more than any of us realize because very little of it makes the news.

It's just increased recently to the point that they can no longer keep all of it out from under the news.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jul-9

Thanks to alternative news media.

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