Opinion Polls: Delphi's Polling Place

Hosted by Cstar1

Opinion polls on all subjects. Opinions? Heck yes, we have opinions - but we're *always* nice about it, even when ours are diametrically opposed to yours. Register your vote today!

  • 4033
    MEMBERS
  • 75461
    MESSAGES
  • 9
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

Park confrontation    The Newsy You: News of Today

Started 5/26/20 by Showtalk; 2686 views.
Showtalk said:

I wonder how many mayors will escape blame for their bad decisions.

Most of them will blame it on anyone but themselves. That's typical sociopathic behavior: it's always someone else's fault.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Jun-1

I didn’t think about deaths due to being locked in by a curfew.  If ambulances can’t get in to get people to hospitals, there will be peripheral casualties.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Jun-1

Isn’t it a mayor’s fault if they don’t call in for help soon enough?

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Jun-1

Re: covid-19. I found it amusing that all the marchers and rioters here managed to keep their masks on throughout the rioting. It was truly a mixed race event.
kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Jun-1

Portland' mayor was on his way to say goodbye to his dying mother but returned.
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Jun-1

They have to wear masks to avoid being identified. It provides cover for looting and destroying.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Jun-1

That is sad.  He didn’t get to see her?

kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Jun-1

Works well for them. There was one guy arrested who had the worst tattoo over most of his face.
kizmet1

From: kizmet1

Jun-1

I don't think so.

"peripheral damage" - good phrase.

Also I wonder, how long till some doctor or nurse is shot by cops or a gang for breaking curfew to try and get to work.

Or a utility worker trying to fix a power outage or something.

About 40 years ago, some of us did drills to practice covert movement in violation of a curfew. It was really kind of like a war games. It was done on a normal night in Lubbock near the campus, and we had some who were actively looking for the participants, while the participants had a goal of getting somehow from a specific spot in the city to another spot, where they would then call from a pay phone at the "finish line".

If you were spotted, the searchers had flashlights, and some golf balls. If they shined the flashlight on you, you were "caught", and if you ran, then you could be "killed" if anyone successfully threw a golf ball and managed a hit.

Then everyone was debriefed to figure out what they did wrong and what they did right. Scoring was based on distance, percentage points of the distance you had to cover without being caught. If you actually reached the pay phone and made the call, you got 1000 points for mission completion, but if you were caught you only got 2 points per percent of the distance you had covered. If you were "killed", then you got 1 point.

This was before cell phones and before paintball became popular.

Anyway, we learned some things from the Army ROTC folks, and we used "Survival, Evasion and Escape: Department of the Army Field Manual FM 21-76." as a guide. I think it might be available to download here:
http://seasonedcitizenprepper.com/preparedness-downloads/

although it might be drinking from a fire hose. Amazon is also selling paperback editions.

https://www.amazon.com/Survival-Evasion-Escape-Department-Manual/dp/B001TAK6EA

It's kind of dated because it was published in January 1969. The North Vietnamese Army didn't have drones with thermal cameras that can see your body heat from 50,000 feet day or night, as you move in total darkness. They didn't have Stingray cell phone hijacking equipment, and they didn't have surveillance cameras with motion detection technology mounted on every building corner, and the Viet Cong didn't all have cell phones to report any suspicious movement that might win them a bounty for the capture of a downed pilot.

So evasion in a dense urban area is a heck of a lot more complicated than evasion in the dense jungles of North Vietnam, although getting captured at least in 21st Century America shouldn't involve the brutality inside the Hanoi Hilton, but ... in the tense environment of a lockdown curfew, one might find that roving patrols are likely to have a skittish person who would shoot first at whatever moves. So it might actually in some aspects be a lot more dangerous than exfiltrating North Vietnam to friendly territory.

One might disguise themselves as one of the people patrolling the curfew, but getting caught at that would also be very bad. It's just a lot tougher these days than it was some 51 years ago to move covertly.

However, also, people are lazy and they eventually get bored. But the problem is, now the enemy has a vast array of machines that can see and hear and track and communicate far better than any human, and never gets tired or bored or distracted. So it's like the Resistance against the Terminators. But there are also finite resources. We also have useful communications although it's not as secure.

Still, one can use a hybrid of code phrases and very specific old school signaling to orchestrate, say, a diversion elsewhere that draws a lot of attention to just the equivalent of a dumpster fire, and away from where you need to travel, but that only works with a well coordinated network.

And there's no guarantee there won't be spies in those networks that would let you be led straight into a trap.

Then doctors, nurses, etc. aren't trained in such stuff and they don't generally have the kind of connections to actually get a real pass to travel openly in the midst of such a lockdown, at least not for a while in such chaos. Then those who have other urgent situations, with no "official" connections, are just considered expendable chattel - the "others" - the "masses" or "serfs" like in the feudal days of yore.

It's a short step into the thousand years of darkness that we were warned about in 1964.

TOP