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Do You Believe Russia Paid Bounty to Taliban To Kill US Soldiers?   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started Jun-27 by BWArtist; 562 views.
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad 

Jul-2

In message 13, I refer to the radicalization of the Republican Party.  Of course, tit started with Newt Gingrich.  Here's an editorial comment by Jay Bookman from the AJC,, March 7, 2016

Start with the style and tenor of modern Republican politics. Ceaseless confrontation, bullying, appeals to anger, resentment and persecution, a capacity for shamelessness that allows you to say or do anything to win -- these have long been the hallmarks of Gingrichian politics. As we've seen in this presidential cycle, the Gingrich style has become the house style of the Republican Party as well.  -- The GOP world view, in which their political opponents are not merely wrong or mistaken but agents of pure evil out to betray all that is good and decent in America, is also a distinct Gingrichian legacy.  https://www.ajc.com/blog/jay-bookman/gop-wants-someone-blame-start-with-newt-gingrich/V2nE49vBoHtSWgOVu5ihPL/

And here's an editorial on CNN today talking about using the Gingrichian tactics described above to enable fringe candidates to become mainstream.

For three years, President Donald Trump has served  . . . elevating wild and outlandish ideas that once only existed in the dark provinces of the internet. Under his leadership, the Republican Party is now openly embracing candidates of that same ilk -- - raising the possibility that those ideas will make their way to the halls of Congress.   https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/02/politics/trump-conspiracy-theorists-qanon/index.html

And in 2018 editorial by Paul Krugman, an economist I greatly respect

So here’s what you should know: the policy ideas [of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez] are definitely bold, and you can make some substantive arguments against them. But they aren’t crazy. By contrast, the ideas of Tea Party Republicans are crazy; in fact, Ocasio-Cortez’s policy positions are a lot more sensible than those of the Republican mainstream, let alone the GOP’s more radical member https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/03/opinion/radical-democrats-are-pretty-reasonable.html

In other words, there's plenty of evidence that the Republican Party has become radicalized and that Gringrich was the progenitor and Trump the heir,

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Jul-2

Why are Pelosi and others always trying to keep AOC in line?  For every article you post that shows one R bias, there is an article to show the opposite.  It’s interesting that you keep blaming Republicans. That means, to follow your logic that Democrats can’t make their own decisions but are merely reacting to things Republicans have started.  Otherwise there would be no need to go back 20-30 years to blame anyone.  If politicians are leaders, they are innovators and forward thinking.  They are not living in the past.

MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad 

Jul-3

I am not privy to Speaker Pelosi's thought processes, but I would speculate that she has asked Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to support the measures which Speaker Pelosi thinks are more important in the short term, even though McConnell will never bring them to the floor for debate.  I predict that some of Representative Ocasio-Cortez' proposals will resurface after the Democrats take control of the Senate in 2021 and the legislation can be passed. 

You have to admit that she is certainly refreshing. 

showtalk says:  ". . . Democrats can’t make their own decisions but are merely reacting to things Republicans have started."

That's a skillful twist.  I mentioned above that the Democrats have passed some very important legislation in the past 547 days.  McConnell has made it clear that he will bring nothing from the House to the floor.   McConnell is operating in the same Newt Gingrich no compromise mode that the party has used to set the stage for Trump's campaign in 2016.

His career is important to understand if you want to understand how we got to this point in our politics. ... If you look at the way that [Gingrich] gained power in the first place, he did it very deliberately and methodically by undermining the institution of Congress itself from within, by kind of blowing up the bipartisan coalitions that had existed for a long time in Washington and then using the kind of populist anger at the gridlock in Congress to then take power. And that's a strategy we've seen replicated again and again, all the way up into 2016 when Trump was campaigning on draining the swamp. This is a strategy that may seem kind of commonplace now but that Newt Gingrich was one of the premier architects of.  https://www.npr.org/2018/11/01/662906525/combative-tribal-angry-newt-gingrich-set-the-stage-for-trump-journalist-says

I've provided you with another link which talks about how Gingrich changed the tactics of the Republican party and how and why they are still using those tactics today.  Trump followed them to the letter in his campaign and will definitely follow them in his attempt at re-election.  There's plenty of information available if you would like more.

The Democrats will just have to wait until they take control the White House and the Senate in 2021 to get important legislation passed.

showtalk says:  ". . .they [politicians] are innovators and forward thinking."

That's an amusing remark.  Thanks for the laugh.

BWArtist

From: BWArtist 

Jul-3

I watched this discussion the other day. Observations from a military intelligence officer, retired navy. A very sobering perspective and I feel his conclusions are spot on.  At any rate, I feel his books would be good to check out at your library.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QnefEDB8ig4

BWArtist

From: BWArtist 

Jul-3

Analogizing history to see how we got to this point is just being sensible. But some people insist on just focusing on a few trees. Instead of looking at the whole forest.

BWArtist

From: BWArtist 

Jul-7

Just seen an interview with the author. Thought this might be a good read about Newt.

MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad 

Jul-7

Thank you for posting, I read the excerpt and the review.    I find it interesting that such a book would be published while we talking about Gingrich's impact on a take no prisoners style of politics.

If it was politically useful to engage in behavior that could destroy the possibility of governance, which rendered bipartisanship impossible and would unfairly decimate their opponents’ reputations, then so be it. Gingrich-era Republicans were willing to enter into alliances of convenience with extremists who trafficked in reactionary populism, nativism, and racial backlash. The party kept counting on Gingrich’s media-centered strategy, tailoring its actions and statements to push the national conversation in its favor, even if that depended on mixing fact and fiction and practicing a new, brass-knuckles politics of smear.  https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/07/books/review/burning-down-the-house-by-julian-e-zelizer-an-excerpt.html

Trump certainly picked up the style and manner.  In the excerpt, Gingrich refers to he and Trump as political "pirates."  We see Gingrich's revolution In Trump's style and in the current radicalization of the Republican party.

I was a little disappointed in the review [it's no wonder.  The review is by Geoffrey Kabaservice . . . research director of the Republican Main Street Partnership], but I picked up this significant passage about the murder of effective governance and the reason for the Republican alienation from truth.

Although Burning Down the House  is not the first history to cast Gingrich as lead assassin in the murder of bipartisanship and effective governance, it is an insightful if deeply unflattering portrait of Gingrich himself, highlighting his signature traits of arrogance, ferocity, amorality and shoulder-shrugging indifference to truth[bolding mine --MD]  https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/07/books/review/burning-down-the-house-julian-zelizer.html

We're seeing a latter day version of the Gingrich style in Trump's current efforts to divide the nation with his descriptions of the protesters as ". . . evil' heralds of a new 'far-left fascism' who seek 'the end of America'" and stating that "'Our nation is witnessing a merciless campaign to wipe out our history, defame our heroes, erase our values and indoctrinate our children.'”  https://www.nytimes.com/2020/07/07/opinion/trump-mount-rushmore-culture-war.html

Especially divisive even by Trump's usual standards, and more tally marks on the liar's blackboard for the man of 20,000 lies.  Gingrich at his down and dirtiest.

Thanks for posting.  The excerpt is enjoyable.  May see if my library has a copy.

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