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Just why?   The Jovial You: Humor, Jokes and Riddles

Started 5/27/21 by WALTER784; 899 views.
WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Jun-15

Showtalk said...

They may not have realized it but they planned for old age in advance by living near family and I’m good locations.  I knew a woman whose children all lived out of town.  Her husband was younger than she was but he died and she was alone in a two story house that was not close to stores or doctors.  She lived to be 98, but the last few years had to move in with one daughter.

This is yet one more difference and unique property of Japan and that is their collective society mentality... if you can call it that. Direct translation translates it as "welfare", but it's not anything similar what so ever to the US "welfare" society.

Here in Japan, when people loose loved ones and live at home alone, near by neighbors work with the local city hall to check up on them at least once a day depending on their needs. If those living alone are disabled, checking up is done several times a day, but it's not a city implemented system, it's just a city coordinated system with the local area Presidents, sub section managers, etc. (i.e. Everybody looks out for each other.) And this eliminates the those living along with no nearby relatives or no siblings, etc. dying alone in their own house and not being discovered until the smell radiates to the neighbors.

Japan has quite a lot of elderly and the people in each area take care of themselves. If one gets to the point where they cannot seem to function properly living alone, it's immediately made know to city hall and only then do they step in to assist in getting the person out of the home where they're unable to live by themselves and into an elderly folks home so that someone can monitor and care for them properly.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jun-15

Thatnis a good system. We have nothing like it here.  I just talked to a woman whose four different relatives ages 52-58 just moved to retirement homes on the same street.

  • Edited June 15, 2021 3:44 pm  by  Showtalk
WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Jun-15

Showtalk said...

I just talked to a woman whose four different relatives ages 52-58 just moved to retirement homes on the same street.

52-58 moving into retirement homes... WOW... that's quite young if you ask me.

The area I live in here in Japan has 309 houses, and approximately 120 or more of those are elderly people. And by elderly, I mean 70's ~ 90's! Some live with spouse, some, one spouse has passed away.

My wife works as a caregiver in a nearby elderly retirement home. Average age of those who live there is 88 with the eldest 103 years old. They don't move in until they're unable to care for themselves.

But 52-58 is just unbelievable... I'm 63 and well... I can't see myself going into a retirement home any time soon! Those four are all younger than me so I just have trouble pondering about that.

FWIW

 

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jun-16

They don’t have to do maintenance or worry about anything in the complex. The one I heard about are all houses in the same section.  They care for themselves unless they get to a point where they can’t.  Then everything they need it right there for them.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Jun-16

Showtalk said...

They don’t have to do maintenance or worry about anything in the complex. The one I heard about are all houses in the same section.  They care for themselves unless they get to a point where they can’t.  Then everything they need it right there for them.

But at age 52-58? That was my point.

I'm 63... older than that entire age group. My dad is 91... 33~39 years older than all of them!

I worked until I turned 63... so why do people of working age go into a retirement home? It just makes no sense to me.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jun-16

They aren’t working.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Jun-16

Showtalk said...

They aren’t working.

Not working at age 52-58? Why?

My Dad is 91 and not working.

My Aunt is 84 and not working.

I'm 63 and just retired... not working.

But none of us are in retirement homes.

So why do non working people have to go into retirement homes?

What about the 20 ~ 51 age group whom aren't working? How many of them are in retirement homes?

FWIW

  • Edited June 16, 2021 12:00 pm  by  WALTER784
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jun-16

They retire early.  Some people do well and don’t need to work anymore or they can’t for health reasons.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784

Jun-17

Showtalk said...

They retire early.  Some people do well and don’t need to work anymore or they can’t for health reasons.

For health reason, yes I can understand.

But just because you retire early and/or are well off? Doesn't make sense to me. Why can't you just live in your own home until you're unable to?

My dad retired at 52 from his job, but he continued to work until he was 69 at his home. He wasn't really that well off... a car mechanic, but after retiring, he continued to work on cars in the garage in back of our house until 69 years of age. And even now, at 91, he continues to live at that same home I was born and raised in.

He lets others mow his lawn now, but inside the house, he vacuums, cleans and cooks by himself.

He's lived there for more than 65 years and just doesn't want to leave.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk

Jun-18

You assume people love their houses.  I can tell you why people I know have moved.  To be closer to family, either children, grandchildren, siblings or parents.  To give up a big house or yard that requires upkeep or has more space than they need.  To cut costs. A larger home or yard can have costs associated with it. Retirement communities provide yardwork, sometimes even housecleaning.  Some provide meals.  All do their own maintenance.  To avoid enormous property taxes that keep rising snd pricing people out of their own homes.  Because they have made huge profits on their homes in the form of equity.  To move now while they are still young enough to enjoy it and when they can make new friends and find new activities. To pursue hobbies only available in a different area.

I know two people who moved relatively young to be closer to adult children when they had their own children.  They wanted to know their grandchildren. Another woman and her husband moved around the country each time an adult child had a baby and acted as nannies for them.  They were not elderly but one was retired.  The husband was a nurse and got a new job at each location.  They stayed until the child was able to start preschool and ended up staying in one city when the final grandchild was born. The wife is retired, the husband still,works. The wife was in law enforcement and physically and mentally could not do the job anymore. I think she retired at age 50.

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