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College Degree? (See next post for de...   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started Aug-10 by WALTER784; 9828 views.
WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Aug-12

Showtalk said...

I meant to mention it in a previous post but military technical training is like going to college.

Yes... it's equivalent... but it's not a diploma for jobs that require a diploma!

But on another note... jobs that require a driver's license... think about it. I started driving at age 12 (of course sitting on my grandfather's lap, but without a driver's license). I got my driver's license at age 15... yep... you shouldn't be able to get a license until you're 16... but I got mine 90 days before I turned 16. And I passed with flying colors... the teacher was really surprised.

But back to the point... You're hiring taxi drivers. You have this 10 year veteran driver with a no accident record and this 22 year old who just got his license last week (i.e. a paper driver). Or perhaps, you have this 45 year old who got their license when they were 18 but hasn't driven in ages). Who would you hire? In this case, the 10 year veteran with no accident record who drives daily would usually win the job. Except in the US. Because the 22 year old who just got their license is a minority and due to diversity... you must hire them!!! (* BARF *)

Paper degrees, paper licenses... etc. all mean nothing without experience.

When you can show time and again, astonishing things which you've accomplished without a college degree, customers, employers will usually choose the accomplishments.

I have one very different example. My company wanted to outsource me to a customer. But the customer required that I have a valid Cisco CCIE certificate. I had a valid CCIE certificate about 4 years prior to that but renewing that certificate each year costed my company $6,000. But the company's customer insisted that I had a valid CCIE certificate.

I was a manager in that company and spoke with the directors and told them that if that customer wanted to ignore my 12 years experience over a paper holding CCIE novice... that they shouldn't be our customer. Management agreed and we turned that customer down. They didn't turn me down... my company turned the customer down. And that was a good call too because that customer made the local news because the paper CCIE they did finally hire, apparently caused a security breach due to his lack of knowledge several years later. (* LOL *) Some call that karma!!!

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Aug-12

You have the equivalent of several degrees of knowledge and a facility for all kinds of language, both human and computer.  Very impressive!  

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Aug-12

Your taxi example doesn’t take into account that as a country, we should encourage and help young adults find careers and starting jobs.  It shouldn’t be either or. It would be best if all young adults who want to work can find jobs, no matter what race, ethnicity or beliefs.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Aug-12

Showtalk said...

Your taxi example doesn’t take into account that as a country, we should encourage and help young adults find careers and starting jobs

Well, the taxi example does show that not only a degree, but also practical experience are what's necessary to get a good job.

And right out of college, most kids don't have any practical experience unless they worked part time somewhere or unless their parents/relatives allowed them into their company and see how things are done.

For most kids, working part time would probably not really have much to do with what ever major they're interested in unless they are one of the very very very luck few. As for the rest... simple things like showing up for work on time... regardless of the job. Coming in late, not showing up for work, taking too many days off, etc. are ALL detrimental to one's reference for work. 

Another thing... just ONLY doing what one is told to do and doing a half-ass job at that won't get you very far either. One should strive to improve... and that improve could be both their own abilities as well as things they see within the company which they think could be improved upon and done better. That will excel them into better positions and give a good reference on their raport.

Showtalk said...

It would be best if all young adults who want to work can find jobs, no matter what race, ethnicity or beliefs.

Race, ethnicity and beliefs shouldn't be a problem today. But for young adults to find jobs, they require a few basic minimal skills... reading, writing and arithmetic being the most essential. Many kids who graduate high school today, cannot even perform those basic fundamental skills proficiently. Our school system has failed our children. Kids who graduate today (high school or college), are lacking many skills that they should have been taught in school. 

Another problem is... companies want experienced people, but those right out of high school or college have little to no practical experience. Therefore, these new graduates have to find a company that will take them without much experience. But the kids don't want to take those kinds of jobs because they have their degrees... they just lack experience. So schools should have taught these kids that they're going to have to do some kind of work they may not want to at first to gain the practical experience necessary to get into the professions they want to get into.

And then don't forget the companies themselves. Some companies offer in-house training for their employees. This is the best type of company to work for. But many companies have stopped offering in-house training because often times, it can take 2 ~ 3 years for one to garner certain skills. But when students join a company, spend 2 years in training and then just up and leave for the competition... the company who gave the training doesn't get back from that employee what they put into train them. And thus many companies have stopped doing in-house training because it's not profitable if employees just quit right after they receive their training.

But back to practical experience. I started mowing lawns in my neighborhood at age 12. The neighbors all knew me and thus paid me to mow their lawn. $3 ~ $5 per yard depending on the size and number of obstacles in their yard. They pointed out to me that I missed here or there and asked that I go back and do those places which I missed. That taught me to check my own work first and then tell them I was finished. That improved the customer's satisfaction as well as the customer referring me to other neighbors. By the time I was 16... I was making upward of $250/mo. just mowing lawns.

At age 16, I got my driver's license and found a job at a Taco Tico restaurant. I started out washing dishes and wiping down tables and sweeping/mopping the floors. I soon graduated to the kitchen where they had me fill the tortilla shells with meat, vegetables topped with the sauce the customer wanted and then wrapped in the right paper that showed which sauce was on it. Finally, they taught me how to use the grill and I started frying the meat that was used. I learned how to do inventory, write order slips for items we were running low on, etc. And all of that was before I graduated high school.

I did mention McDonald's earlier in one of my posts, because they do offer in-house training and it can do wonders for picking up basic skills.

The problem with most kids today is either they can't (lacking skills) or don't want to do (have the skills but just don't like the job they were told to do) any kind of tedious/mundane work.

Sometimes, some of those tedious or mundane jobs are like the movie Karate Kid... where Miyagi Sensei (teacher) had him paint a picket fence over and over again to build up his arm muscles so he could better block his opponents. But initially, he didn't realize that he was actually getting the skills he needed to succeed.

Not every job is fun. Sometimes you have to do things you don't like or want to do. But unless it's dangerous or against your religious beliefs, you should accept it, do the job to the best of your ability and move on.

Finally, sometimes, there are more people for a job than there are actual jobs themselves. That can vary from sector to sector depending on the type of job. 

Like I said above. I started out lawn mowing when I was 12, at 16 worked part time at a restaurant and from 19 joined the US Navy. Since then, I switched jobs 7 times... each for a nice pay raise, but upon joining each new company, I went out of my way to prove my worth to the company and all of them gave me high ranking marks for my performance because I really helped each and every company I worked for improve their businesses while also improving my technical and practical experience working for them.

FWIW

  • Edited August 12, 2021 11:10 pm  by  WALTER784
Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Aug-13

Schools have one job. To teach children knowledge they need to get by in life. Math. Reading. History.  Science If they can’t do that, they are useless.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Aug-13

Showtalk said...

Schools have one job. To teach children knowledge they need to get by in life. Math. Reading. History.  Science If they can’t do that, they are useless.

Yep... and our education system has failed our students.

I say defund the education department... NOT the police!!!

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Aug-13

K-12 public education needs a full revamp.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Aug-13

Showtalk said...

K-12 public education needs a full revamp.

Scrap and rebuild would be quicker and easier

Fire everybody... and screen new teachers with special preference for ex-military personnel.

Ensure those teachers are fully aware of our History and our Constitution (which is the backbone of our country). Ensure pride for our country and respect for our flag are taught properly. Ex-military are already familiar with these things.

FWIW

Showtalk
Host

From: Showtalk 

Aug-13

That is what education was like when I was a child except most teachers were women.

WALTER784

From: WALTER784 

Aug-13

Showtalk said...

That is what education was like when I was a child except most teachers were women.

Me too... now that I think about it, I think about 80% of the teachers were women and 20% were men.

FWIW

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