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Shoe Experts - Riddle Me This!   Non-Golf Folder (General)

Started Oct-10 by Luvpings (luvpings1); 903 views.

How does my shoelace get twisted like this?  I loosen and tighten each row of laces the same way, but yet, it is always that lace that crosses between the second and third eyelet that gets all wound up.    These are my Hoka  One One shoes.  Same thing happens with my Brooks Ghost.

It would seem to me that if the twist happens when I either tighten or loosen the laces, that it would un-twist when doing the opposite.  Has always been a mystery to me.  Every once in a  while I take them out and untwist them. 

And not to one-up you Captain Obvious' out there...sure round laces would likely solve the problem.  But I am not asking for a solution...I want to know the cause.

Charlie6D

From: Charlie6D

Oct-10

It MIGHT be because you weren't consistent when you laced the shoes up the first time.  When I'm using "flat" type laces, I make sure when lacing up the shoes for the first time that I always keep the lace flat going through the eyelet, then flip the lace so that it will remain flat for the next crossing.  Also, I make sure that if I start out by crossing the left lace over the right lace, then I continue to cross the left lace over the right lace all the way to the top.  You didn't do that, and it appears that the twisting is taking place where you changed from left over right to right over left.  Also, the laces are twisted above the bad area too.

Didn't think I'd be giving advice on how to properly lace up shoes when I logged on today.  :)

Charlie-------------------------------------------------------------------------

BOGEYSBGONE

From: BOGEYSBGONE

Oct-10

Luvpings (luvpings1) said...

 

How does my shoelace get twisted like this?  I loosen and tighten each row of laces the same way, but yet, it is always that lace that crosses between the second and third eyelet that gets all wound up.    These are my Hoka  One One shoes.  Same thing happens with my Brooks Ghost.

It would seem to me that if the twist happens when I either tighten or loosen the laces, that it would un-twist when doing the opposite.  Has always been a mystery to me.  Every once in a  while I take them out and untwist them. 

And not to one-up you Captain Obvious' out there...sure round laces would likely solve the problem.  But I am not asking for a solution...I want to know the cause.

 

 

I see what Charlie sees. The pattern is inconsistent.   I'm going to assume you lace up your shoes one side at a time, with different tensions.  It could lead to that picture you show.

This taps my OCD-reflex - so I will ask:

How do you lace up your shoes?   I'm major OCD for this shit - and I basically start with a flat lace running through the bottom eyelets and it lays flat with equal parts on the right and left side.  Then I cross right side over through the next higher left eyelet; then alternate with the left side to the right; then switch back and forth till I get to the top.  But that assures a flat lace, consistent tension, and a consistent pattern and reduces any twisting.  Certainly NEVER like what you experience.   It looks like you take one side and zig zag them up until the top first; then do the entire other side.  If so - I found that that method adds a lot of twists and different tensions - and it could result in what you're experiencing.  

...I hate myself for obsession of this stuff...   LOL

Robb

It has nothing to do with how you lace your shoes.  It's because of the knot you tie.

You must twist the lace when you tie the knot. From there, I'm guessing the twist gets pulled\pushed passed the first eyelet as you walk\run.  But when you untie the knot, the twist stays on the other side of the eyelet.  Over time, successive twists add up and work their way down to the place of least resistance. 

Charlie6D

From: Charlie6D

Oct-10

RocketsRedGlare (V65Saber) said...

 

It has nothing to do with how you lace your shoes.  It's because of the knot you tie.

You must twist the lace when you tie the knot. From there, I'm guessing the twist gets pulled\pushed passed the first eyelet as you walk\run.  But when you untie the knot, the twist stays on the other side of the eyelet.  Over time, successive twists add up and work their way down to the place of least resistance. 

 

Very interesting.  So to combat this problem, the OP could start tying his shoes in a reverse manner.  In other words "twist the strings in the opposite direction" and see if this straightens them out.  For example, if the first move in tying his shoes is normally to cross the left string over the right string and then pull the left string under and through, he could reverse that and instead cross the right string over the left string and pull the right string under and through.  Likewise, if he then normally bends the right string and throws the left string over and pulls it through, he could instead bend the left string and throw the right string over and pull it through.  In other words, just reverse the whole procedure. 

This sounds like an interesting science project.  :)

Charlie-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Yeah I do try to keep the laces flat as they go through the eyelet and across the tongue.  While I appreciate the thought, I just don't see how tension of going over or under consistently can add twist to the lace.  Something has to be "spinning" it from the end of the lace (what are those things called again?) IMO.

Now this makes sense to me.  I just use what I guess is the common knot that "everybody" uses...bow knot?

Good lord I would have a better chance of reciting the alphabet backwards than tying my shoe backwards after 50+ years.  But yeah, could be an interesting experiment.  I will have to check my sons running shoes to see if his get twisted.  White Velcro shoes are looking better all the time!

BOGEYSBGONE

From: BOGEYSBGONE

Oct-10

Luvpings (luvpings1) said...

 

Yeah I do try to keep the laces flat as they go through the eyelet and across the tongue.  While I appreciate the thought, I just don't see how tension of going over or under consistently can add twist to the lace.  Something has to be "spinning" it from the end of the lace (what are those things called again?) IMO.

 

I used to work in a tennis shop and strung tennis racquets; and also had to set out clothing and shoes.   I had to lace them out of the box and put one of them on display.  We would have to do 5-6 whenever new models came out from a supplier.  One of our guys did the "one side, then the other side" and he didn't care - but I remember his was all twisted b/c he didn't take time to make it flat.I did it one eyelet/flat at a time - and I ended up having to do ALL the damned shoes b/c I was the OCD-guy and they looked nice to the customers!    LOL    Even still - I've used what I think is standard knot (make one loop, then wrap the other side around it and through).  I didn't do the kids way of 2 bunny ears and wrap one over/under.    So I dont think the tieing technique would do that.  

Only other thing I saw is that you're inconsistent in your over/under pattern.   LOL

When you tighten up the shoe - do you pull on the long laces only?  Or do you sort of "pull the X's" from the middle laces to tighten the shoe at different places?  That could possibly twist it too?   It's still a mystery...

Robb

Stoneded

From: Stoneded

Oct-11

The tension differential between those particular eyelets caused by the dynamic flux of your instep expanding and contracting causes that classic double helix pattern to manifest in your shoe lace configuration.

  • Edited October 11, 2020 1:01 pm  by  Stoneded
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