About Smoking Cessation Forum

Hosted by Denim50

This community is open to all who are recovering from nicotine addiction.

  • 5606
    MEMBERS
  • 285315
    MESSAGES
  • 20
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

August Avengers `12 - Part 2   Quit Buddies Unite

Started 8/23/15 by ModDee; 14133 views.
DaveBarry1

From: DaveBarry1

Oct-25

Hi Douglas.

Yes, I am still quit, after 10 years this past July. 

Those were crazy days, eh? I couldn't have done it without the August Avengers '12. 

I experienced my first craving in a very long time a few days ago, it was more of a wistful remembrance than a solid crave so it wasn't an issue, but it's frightening that nicotine still has a hold over me.

regards

Dave

DaveBarry1

From: DaveBarry1

Oct-25

Hi Kate / SandDune

I got a shoutout from Douglas which linked me to this thread.  Nice to see your post and that you are also still quit.

Regards 

Dave (It's all about the carrot - lol)

Douglas8845

From: Douglas8845

Oct-25

That group was key to my quit as well. Lots of fun talks with lots of support.  I still jump in here now and then because it keeps my quit fresh.  Also, long time quitters who were once hardcore smokers can inspire some who are taking their first steps.

When I joined the group, anyone with a six month quit became an instant legend.

Good to hear from you

Jerthie123

From: Jerthie123

Nov-9

Hi Doug... I stumbled upon this post of yours and wanted to respond to something you said. You said that the combination of this forum, Alan Carr and the patch helped you to beat nicotine addiction. I can say, Doug, that for me, beating and this time really beating nicotine addiction is being done with a reduce to quit program and this forum. Hopping on this forum has been instrumental to me in staying at 5-6 lozenges a day, down from 12. It is not a full clean quit. Yet. But now after reading some old threads, I have hope that I, like all of you, can be free for good! Thank you so much for all the encouragement and inspiration!

Douglas8845

From: Douglas8845

Nov-10

Hi Jerthie,

Good to hear from you and how you're committed to your quit.  It is doable and I'm proof of it.  As you pointed out, I had three pillars to my quit: Allen Carr, this forum and the patch. 

Since I was seriously addicted to nicotine, I decided to modify the recommendation of the patch program.  Instead of reducing the patch dosage on a recommended schedule, I decided to do it my way.  I would use the 21mg patch until I broke the habitual behavior, no matter how long it would take.  After I few days using it, I noticed that I was not missing my habitual smokes as much as I imagined I would.  There were instances of wanting to smoke but which easily passed.   This was a revelation to me.  I used to believe I liked to smoke, especially at certain times of day.  With the patch on I would often forget about lighting up on those favorite moments. I  suddenly realized that I wanted to smoke because my blood nicotine level was low and time to fill the tank, nothing to do with a special cigarette moment.  The patch enabled  me to avoid lighting up until the next "special smoking moment".

To make a long story short, at the end of the fourth week with the patch, due to a schedule change, I left the house without slapping it on my arm.  Panic ensued. I would have to turn around to go back home to get it.  Because traffic was a nightmare I would arrive late if I did that. I went to work without the patch and survived. 

This event showed me what smoking was: an addiction to a substance and I could live without it.  That was my first day of freedom from nicotine.  I've been nicotine free for over 10 years.

I really did it!!

Jerthie123

From: Jerthie123

Nov-11

Thanks for your response Douglas, and great story about how you got quit. I, too am finding that there are no magical lozenges moments and that it is all about putting more and more time in between each lozenge. I wanted a lozenge an hour and a half ago. I still haven't had it. And now the craving is gone. I do have a few things to do now though, so this is where it gets tricky for me. I find that if I have a lot ahead of me, I use one to get me motivated to start. This is not always the case though. Sometimes I can motivate myself and get started without the lozenge. But the good news is that I am using 5 lozenges a day now instead of 6, for the past 2 days now anyway! Thank you for sharing your story Douglas. It was a great read. I will go on line now and purchase Allen Carr's book. I can use all the help I can get. What is most helpful for me when I have a craving is hopping on this forum and venting. I can't tell you how it has saved me so many times now. We shall see if I can stick to 5 again today instead of 6. But it sure feels good to no longer be at 12. I will be baking a blueberry bread soon. I also like social media, so that distracts me as well. I bought a book of word searches at work last night too, hopefully that rewires my brain to think differently when a craving hits. And then writing out about my cravings on paper and praying out loud helps too. Lastly, gum and water. This is all for now. God bless us all!!

Douglas8845

From: Douglas8845

Nov-12

"But it sure feels good to no longer be at 12"... and good to keep that in mind.

Our group,  the August Avengers '12, was going very strong, enthusiastic, excited, hopeful that soon lighting up would be a thing of the past.  I noticed that some would start losing their enthusiasm (for a variety of reasons) and participating less and less until they finally ghosted the group.  I compared our group to a ship that had departed from a dock on Smokers Island, facing a journey through turbulent waters on our way to Smoke Free land.  The first few miles were scary, everyone hanging on for dear life. Were we ever going to make it? The seas seemed to get rougher and rougher.  The fear that things would get even worse was like the bubonic plague,  infecting some of the passengers, spooking others. Especially bad was when stalwart crew members  could be seen swimming frantically back to Smoker's Island.  Most however stayed on board and reached the freedom they so craved.  After much glad handing ("can you believe we made it?")  we bade each other farewell and started new lives as citizens of Smoke Free land.

It's not an easy journey, but we can all survive it.  There were passengers more faint hearted than your's truly who also made it.

Jerthie123

From: Jerthie123

Nov-12

I could cry, reading this Douglas. Thank you so much! I loved the island analogy. Thank you, thank you, thank you! I am having a bad day. Used 7 lozenges today instead of 6, and it's only 7pm. Oh well! Nothing I can do about that now, except keep trudging along while not beating myself up for it. You must feel so happy and proud of yourself Douglas. Ten years smoke free... Effing amazing. I can only hope I go the rest of tonight not having anymore, and then start again tomorrow. Thank you for giving me the encouragement that at least I am not using my usual 12-13. That's a little something. Far from being where I would like to be, but it is progress! Thank you again Douglas!

Douglas8845

From: Douglas8845

Nov-12

Jerthie, 

Don't beat yourself up.  Just review what led you to exceed your target of daily lozenges and define a strategy that will prevent a repeat.  See this as a learning experience instead of a reason to beat yourself up.  You're fighting the good fight, keep it up.  Everyone admires your determination and persistence.  Keep up the good work!!

Jerthie123

From: Jerthie123

Nov-13

Thanks Douglas. I know where I went wrong. And I do have a strategy now for what to do whenever I hit that same spot. Today is a new day, so I will simply... Begin again!

TOP