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Will the cravings go away?   Quit Support

Started 1/13/20 by 1970Flyboy; 681 views.
1970Flyboy

From: 1970Flyboy

1/13/20

Greetings to all - 

I quit like many people based on a new years resolution.  I am currently 13 days free from smoke (yeah me!!!), using Chantix.   I seem to be over the worst of the initial withdrawal symptoms.  My question to people that have successfully stayed smoke free - WILL THESE CRAVINGS EVER GO AWAY?    The physiological dependency seems to be longer reaching than the physical dependency. 

Also, for anyone beginning your quit, I recommend you print out the list of what happens to your body at 20 minutes, 1 day, one week, etc.  I can't tell you how many times  I read that article for motivation to get through the physical symptoms.  

- Derrick

I've been quit for over 6 years and drop by the forum every day to offer support. 

Make sure you read all the articles that the moderators list. An informed quit is a successful quit so read everything on here. The 3 D's are the what most people have difficulty with. The first 3 days, first 3 weeks and first 3 full months. Some where between month 4-5 you will reach a type of peace in the quit and you'll notice that your blue moods lift and you are well on your way to maintaining the quit mindset. So, keep very busy, do lots of deep breathing to calm your nerves and drink lots of water to flush out all the poisons from all those cigarettes. We were all poisoning ourselves and did not totally get what nasty stuff our poor heart, lungs and brain had to deal with. Our brain chemistry got changed once we got hooked but, give it time and your brain will fix everything back to your new normal. I found complete freedom by 14 months others found it sooner and others later so just keep taking this one day at a time and help your quit friends stay on track right along with you. The pay it forward routine on the forum has brought a lot of happy successful quitters the freedom they always wanted. Good luck in your quit.

"Quitting isn't for Sissies!" I quit poisoning myself Sept. 27, 2013

1970Flyboy

From: 1970Flyboy

1/13/20

Thanks for the reply.  Learning a "new normal" is not easy.  Thanks for the support. 

ModAndrea

From: ModAndrea

1/14/20

Congratulations on TWO WEEKS, Derrick! Way to go!

I quit using Chantix, too. It really helped me manage the physical side effects of quitting. Yes, the cravings do ease up. In fact, there will come a day when you realize you haven't even thought about smoking. Keep in mind this is a process with its ups and downs, but it does get better. So much better.

Just like you, I found great encouragement in finding out how quickly my body began to heal when I quit. That was over six years ago.

You are doing all the right things, Derrick. blush Have a wonderful smoke free day!

Hugs,

Andrea

1970Flyboy

From: 1970Flyboy

1/14/20

Thanks for the great response!  Yesterday was tough and when I got home I figured out why.  I forgot to take my morning dose of Chantix.  The cravings were very tough - but manageable.  I can tell that it is not time to quit Chantix yet. 

JEM777

From: JEM777

1/14/20

Hey Derrick!

Every time you conquer a psychological dependency, you gain more strength for the next one. The cravings do go away, for the most part, but it's more about you navigating life without turning to cigarettes to help. Every time you choose not to smoke, your new normal becomes easier to maintain, until it's just a random, fleeting thought. I felt like a true quitter after several months, but it wasn't until I got past month 7 that it really felt like I could navigate anything life could throw at me without a cigarette. However, even a few weeks shy of 1 year, I still protect my quit like a mama bear because I know that addiction is simply one puff away for me. Situational awareness and not simply being a mindless slave to my cravings has been key to me.

When I think, "A ciggy would be so nice right now" and I can't simply shut it down with a "but I don't smoke," I go through the process for me to acquire a cigarette. Each stage offers places to stop and think. Do I really want to get my stuff and get into the car? Do I really want to start the car? Do I really want to open the garage door? Do I really want to drive to the store? Do I really want to turn the car towards the store? Do I really want to park? Do I really want to get out of the car? Do I really want to go inside the store? Do I really want to go up to the counter? Do I really want to order cigarettes? Do I really want to pay for them? Do I really want to take them with me as I leave the store? Do I really want to open the pack? Do I really want to remove a cigarette? Do I really want to put it in my mouth? Do I really want to light it? Do I really want to inhale the smoke? Do I really want to keep inhaling the smoke? -- look at all those places where I could've stopped myself!! Mindfulness about why I wanted one (NICOTINE IS A LIAR), what it will do for me (NOTHING!), and what it means to me (CONTINUED SLAVERY TO CIGARETTES) keeps me on the path to being permanently quit. And yes, this is a lifelong path, but it gets soooo much easier to walk after several months. 

Jpatrick1996

From: Jpatrick1996

1/15/20

Good morning Derrick,

Congrats on your progress so far, it ain't easy!!

I can only pass on my personal experience so far. I quit with the help of Champex (Canadian Chantix I think they're the same thing). The first few weeks were very difficult. I suffered cravings, depression, anger.....you name it, if it was an unhealthy emotion.....I think I experienced it!

I found the support provided by the more seasoned members of this forum invaluable. I actually don't think I would have made it this far had it not been for the support provided here.

As 'clean' time has continued, I now find that I get the odd craving at no particular time....seemingly out of the blue.  They are quite manageable, few and far between now. Keep hanging tough, things will get better, much better.

Might I suggest you download a quit smoking phone app. I did and referred to it frequently in the beginning, still refer to it at least weekly.....helps me to not lose focus on the importance of staying quit. The app I installed also tracks the benefits I've reaped so far in my quit (financial, cancer risk, CO2, lung/heart health etc.). Another stat it updates is how many people have died of smoking related causes since I quit......that's enough to scare me into beating the cravings. 

I think I'll be 6 calendar months tomorrow, been off the Champex for 4 months....it is SOOOOOO worth it! Please trust me and stay quit....we only get so many 'chances'.

Peace.

Patrick

Quit - July 16th, 2019

1970Flyboy

From: 1970Flyboy

1/15/20

Thanks for the kind words Patrick, they are helpful! The day that I wrote the original post the cravings were intense.  When I got home I realized that I had missed a dose of Chantix.  I did not realize how effective that medicine was in curbing the cravings.  And silly me the day before I missed the dose I was thinking that I needed to call me doctor and see if I could ween off of the medicine. 

I have not missed any doses since and the cravings while still present a couple times a day are muted and not significant, totally manageable.  I will continue the medication and take a look at the 2 month mark and see what the doctor has to say. 

Thanks again for the kind words.

ModAndrea

From: ModAndrea

1/15/20

Yikes! Glad you figured it out and got through the day. Absolutely stay on the Chantix for the recommended time. It will help you as you meet the challenges of psychological withdrawal. Here's an excerpt from the article "The 'Icky 3's' of Smoking Cessation". If you'd like to read the whole article, there's a link below.

3 Weeks: Psychological Withdrawal

At three weeks, we've gotten through the shock of physical withdrawal and we're just beginning to tackle the mental side of nicotine addiction. This turn of events often triggers cravings to smoke that can feel like we're back at square one again.

Be aware...even though nicotine might be out of your system by this point, psychological cravings can produce very real physical reactions in our bodies, making a mental trigger feel like physical withdrawal. Thinking about that smoke break you used to take at a certain time of the day can cause tension that makes your stomach churn and leaves you on edge. It feels like a physical craving, and in a way it is...but the source is a thought, not physical withdrawal from nicotine.

You're doing great, Derrick! 

Hugs,

Andrea

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