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Genevieve's road to freedom   Quit Stories and Journals

Started Feb-6 by genevieve25; 445 views.
genevieve25

From: genevieve25

Feb-6

I need help, I first quit 2 years ago and lasted 10 weeks, when I lapsed I didn't tell anyone, since then I've quit and lapsed so many times, I once went 3 months just having one a day! 4 weeks ago I was really serious about it and have had maybe one cigarette every few days until 4 days ago when I bought 20 and have smoked most of them, every time something bad happens I have a smoke to punish myself. I'm determined again to quit but how do I stop lapsing? My family think I haven't smoked for 2 years and I can't admit I have so I have no support, that's why I've joined here.

Quit day Wed 5th Feb

ModDee

From: ModDee

Feb-6

Hey there,

Glad to see you were successful in getting your journal started

What did you learn from your previous quits that will help you with this new one?  What are you doing differently this time?  The bottom line is very simple; you are going to have to want to quit more than you want to smoke and make it happen by doing everything in your power to change your relationship to cigarettes. It has to become your highest priority for the foreseeable future, until you are on solid ground.   If you keep doing the same thing you've been doing with each new quit it will never be successful.  

I believe that you can do this.  Here are some helpful hints from Mod Jenn. and an article that should be helpful to you.

Quit Toolbox

  • Drink ice water through a straw. Repeat. Drink ice water through a straw. Repeat...
  • Knowledge is power. Read everything you can get your hands on about this addiction. The more you understand about your own addiction to nicotine, the better equipped you become to get through the cessation process.
  • Post on the Forum until your fingers are sore. Post, post, post. 
  • Closely related: Go to the NOPE pledge daily and hold yourself accountable.
  • When you come across posts that inspire and/or strengthen you ~ copy and paste them into a Word document. In this way, you can reread them when you feel wibbly wobbly and are climbing the walls.
  • Distract, distract, distract. (Shhhh.....I would do jumping jacks and by the time I got to about 10-12 I was distracted -- that's for sure. Try puzzles, reading a book, anything that shifts the focus of your thoughts.) More generally, stop whatever you are doing, move, and do something else. The craving will pass.
  • Remind yourself this is a journey and the more time you put between now and that last cigarette, the stronger your quit muscles become and the more you have in your quit toolbox. Take it one minute and hour at at time, if necessary, and the days will keep adding up.
  • Every day you go to bed smoke-free is a good day. Be kind to yourself along the way.
  • What you are experiencing is normal - "this too shall pass".
  • Take a shower. Brush your teeth. Put on lotion.
  • Read your quit reasons.
  • Create a list of all the benefits you are experiencing now that you no longer smoke. Practice gratitude at least once a day for these benefits and life changes.
  • Cinnamon flavored sugar-free gum (even cinnamon sticks).
  • Chai tea (I had to avoid coffee for a while but can drink it now without a problem).
  • Eat healthy snacks, such as carrots or frozen grapes (Some honesty here: I didn't always do so well with this one due to this pesky sweet tooth I developed once I could taste my food again. The good news is that as my quit felt more secure my eating wasn't as erratic.)
  • Protect your quit at all costs by avoiding situations that are high-risk for you, especially in the early part of the quit (e.g., other smokers, alcohol, etc.).
  • Make a plan for handling cravings when around temptation. Do not enter potentially difficult situations without a plan.
  • Remind yourself that it's going to be okay - time is your friend as you relearn every aspect of daily life.
  • Keep a journal to record your journey and it's easier to see how far you have come (It gave me perspective at times when I needed to remember that I may not be where I want to be but I'm most certainly not where I used to be.).
  • Reward yourself for the small accomplishments and the larger milestones (this doesn't' have to involve spending money).
  • Exercise - go for walks, join a gym, just keep moving.
  • Accept and tell yourself (that self-talk we have to turn from negative to positive) that the craving is actually a sign of healing and they will occur less frequently and with less intensity as the smoke-free days add up.
  • Deep breathing -- take 4-5 deep breaths -- fill up your diaphragm and and make your tummy stick out.
  • As ModLisa says: "When in doubt go to sleep". 
  • As ModMic says: "SOME DAYS, IT IS ENOUGH THAT YOU JUST DON'T SMOKE. Some days are crappy from beginning to end, and you can kick, scream, cry, punch something, bite someone's head off...if you did not smoke, you win and a little more healing happened".
  • Visualize a craving like a wave washing over you. The tide does leave. 
  • Tell yourself four things: (1) Smoking is no longer an option regardless of what life throws your way; (2) I am worthy of freedom from this addiction; (3) I can. I will. End of story; and (4) I am stronger than this challenge and this challenge is making me stronger.
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In reply toRe: msg 2
genevieve25

From: genevieve25

Feb-6

Thank you Dee

I always feel so determined at the beginning, in my head though I probably always think that I can always have a few if I need them because I can just quit again,

the worst thing is that I really enjoyed smoking, I rolled my own and can even say I enjoyed the taste, so the biggest thing is realising I'll never have that pleasure ever again 

the only different thing this time is joining this forum, I'm hoping that will make the difference

ModDee

From: ModDee

Feb-6

genevieve25 said:

the only different thing this time is joining this forum, I'm hoping that will make the difference

We'll do our best to help make that happen.  Commit to your quit by taking the NOPE pledge each day. Every day forum members from all over the world, at all stages of quit, gather to pledge to remain smoke-free.  NOPE stands for Not One Puff Ever.   One forum member begins the pledge, and others join in. It's a great way to start your day and renew your commitment. You can find it under DISCUSSIONS in the column on the left. Scroll down to General Chit-Chat.

Even in the most difficult of circumstances.  Remember, cravings to smoke are not commands. They’re only thoughts. You don’t have to act on them.  Don’t let hard times reawaken the addict within. Honor the precious gift that life is by doing all you can to nurture your own'.

Best wishes.

(((Hugs)))

In reply toRe: msg 4
genevieve25

From: genevieve25

Feb-7

48 hrs! In work and trying to keep busy

I used to have 2 in the car before coming in, that was hard this morning as it was either hang around at home an extra 30 mins thinking about it or get out of the car 30 mins sooner and sit in the tea room thinking about it, and boy am I thinking about it my head wants to explode

I'm using lozenges to try and help

Belinda2019

From: Belinda2019

Feb-10

Hang in there Genevieve!! You’re doing so well....

post on here as much as you like, and be aware of the ‘icky threes’ - three days, three weeks, three months....we all have your back

And there is nothing wrong with using NRT - patches, gum, lozenges - to get you through....

And remember NOPE

DebraAnne60

From: DebraAnne60

Feb-13

Hey  girl, how ya doin.  I hope your vacation is going well and you are enjoyin yourself.  Just wanted to check and say hi.  Cheers

In reply toRe: msg 7
genevieve25

From: genevieve25

Feb-17

It didn't go well, I gave in and bought a pouch of tobacco. I feel so bad

Enuff2020

From: Enuff2020

Feb-17

It doesn't mean you have to give up on quitting though, and don't be too hard on yourself, the nicotine monster is evil and plays to win.

I've quit heaps of times but I don't want to stop trying. 

There's lots of great reading tips on the forum and the moderators are absolutely brilliant

DebraAnne60

From: DebraAnne60

Feb-17

ok, don't feel bad, learn from it -  what let you cave?  Write it down for the next time you quite - so you can watch out for or prepare yourself to win over that, whatever it was.   Build your toolbox.   Just because you slipped doesn't mean you cannot do it.  You need more practice at being a non-smoker.   Just like learning to play an instrument or driving car, you need to practice being a non-smoker.  I hope you will consider quitting again.

CHeers!!

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