About Smoking Cessation Forum

Hosted by Terry (abquitsmking)

Formerly known as the About.com Smoking Cessation support forum, this community is open to all who are recovering from nicotine addiction.

  • 4407
    MEMBERS
  • 249118
    MESSAGES
  • 133
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

Smoking Cessation   Quit Support

Started Feb-7 by AliceMay5; 469 views.
AliceMay5

From: AliceMay5

Feb-7

Haven't quite convinced myself that not smoking is my gain.  Have been drinking so feel rather vulnerable.  Last drink, as well as my last smoke.  Going to bed now. Hope I will feel differently in the morning,

Heck, I'm still not utterly convinced why I shouldn't die a smoker. Even five months quit, and as much as I appreciate doing aerobics without a stitch in my side, the antismoking arguments from health, smell, activity, longevity, you name it, are mostly blah-blah-blah to me. 

Except.

Except I just couldn't take being trapped like that anymore.

It was weird and still is, and I didn't get a dang thing done for a month, but I'll be *&%#ed if I'm gonna put me back in that @!$*&%# box.

Amicahomi

From: Amicahomi

Feb-13

I am feeling these posts.  Too old, otherwise infirm and unencumbered by anyone to be concerned or offended to believe cessation will much improve or extend my life.  But it has been 10-1/2 months and I've saved enough money to carpet the condo.   The one true and meaningful benefit is release from addiction and self esteem for the effort.

DebraAnne60

From: DebraAnne60

Feb-13

wow, 10 1/2 months, that is so very, very cool.  You'll soon be in the clubhouse.  I totally envy you - way to go, 

CindiS319

From: CindiS319

Feb-13

I felt the same way.  Actually when I quit, I didn't even think I could do it.  I was thinking "Well ok, we'll just give it a shot."  Then something in my brain flipped and as each day went by, I felt stronger and stronger.  Believe me I still had my horrendous moments, but I was determined that I wasn't going back to Day 1.  Also wasn't going to let my quit buddies down coming here and posting that I had a relapse.  I felt more empowered each day and plowed through all the cravings and triggers.

Amicahomi

From: Amicahomi

Feb-13

Thanx, DebraAnne.  You are very kind.  Don't know if a 1-year mark is anything special, though.  An addiction is forever.  It's just a matter of discernment and control like many other things in life.  Also (depending on what data source you see), it may be that most in the U.S. who ever smoked have, in fact, quit.  I believe the CDC estimates quitters to be 40-60% of ever-smokers.  Kind of a hard group to quantify.  This statistic seems to be both heartening and challenging for those of us in the process...

CindiS319

From: CindiS319

Feb-13

One year is huge!  I agree that you always have to be on guard and don't fantasize that you can just have one....ever.  But 1 year you've been through all the "seasonal triggers" and should feel solid in your quit.  For me it was at about 14 months that I literally thought "I'm here" and not going back.  I still have the occasional craving, especially since my husband still smokes, but it is truly a passing thought.  People lose their quit because they're not on their guard or probably have something so tragic and stressful in their lives.  I don't even want to "try one" because I am 100% positive I will lose my entire quit.  You have made a great accomplishment... don't kid yourself.

Amicahomi

From: Amicahomi

Feb-13

I'm humbled and corrected, Miss Cindi : - )  I know most everyone here has serious struggles, and milestones should be respected.  Sometimes I feel a little guilty 'cause, even though I smoked every day for a VERY long time, I haven't had really intense craves.  I just quit on a whim, cold turkey, and after experiencing astronomically high bp*.  I had some panic-y moments, but, for some reason the quit just "stuck".  I have no interest in ever smoking again.  What I remember is foul taste, inconvenience, expense and social pressure.  (Where I live smoking may be the last acceptable discrimination.)  On reflection, I think I had incubated the quit idea for a long time without making any false starts, and perhaps grace befriended me last April second. 

*Incidentally, my bp never did go down.

TOP