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Quit smoking   Quit Support

Started 11/4/21 by Lee.T; 1949 views.
Lee.T

From: Lee.T

Jun-17

Hi Anne it's Lee. Am needing help. I stopped last year October and last week an unbelievable urge hit my that I found myself searching hi and low for a smoke and found  one. Since then it has progressed. I so badly have to find my way back on the path as I seem to be having more and more. I am so devistated and not sure what to do. The urge is getting stronger and stronger to smoke. How can I reverse this.

In reply toRe: msg 16
Anne2020

From: Anne2020

Jun-17

Hello Lee - the only way to reverse the urges are to not smoke.   You have to go through the crave waves for them to dissipate over time.  

Go swimming - take bath a hot bath and melt some chocolate in your mouth - do anything but smoke.   If you have succumbed to and have had a smoke, you need to fight back twice as strong as you did before because now you have told yourself that you really do want to smoke.

Remember this is a fight with yourself.  Talk to yourself and ask you what you really want.  To quite or to carry on.   

Drink super cold ice water through a straw, slowly but continuously.  Get some Halls throat lozenges and suck on them and then breath in through your mouth.  You get a great sensation of cool air passing over your throat.

Remember, you just need to get past the crave waves - they will pass after a  very few minutes.  If you allow them to just wash past you, the waves will become less and less intense and less and less frequent.     

You can do this, if you want to.  

  • Edited June 17, 2022 2:59 pm  by  Anne2020
In reply toRe: msg 16
candrew

From: candrew

Jun-18

Wow - 9 months is a long time. What kept you smoke free for that long? You know that you can do this again. Damn nicotine is extremely powerful, but you are more powerful.

Sounds like something may have happened that triggered your obsession to return to smoking. You know you don't want to go back to it, so where do you go from here?

Having quit and relapsed several times this year I have come to the conclusion that I will never get rid of my obsession to smoke. Be it one day. one week, one month, one year I will be forever fighting the nicotine monster for the rest of my life.

Unfortunately, you have to start the process of quitting again. Set a date that you will stop. It's very important to have a target. Remember the reasons that you wanted to quit, maybe write them down and keep this list close to you. Visit this site frequently as there is a ton of valuable insights that you can draw upon. We are all dealing with the same thing.

Build a list of folks that have responded to your posts. Feel free to stay in touch with them as they truly care about your well-being and want to help.

I have no other suggestions other than to do what you did in October when you made the decision to quit. Hold on to these feelings because it worked for you then and should work for you now.

You can do it!

Andrew

In reply toRe: msg 16
xvaper

From: xvaper

Jun-18

Hi Lee

I am sorry you had a relapse. I quit last July. Usually I don't think about picking up a smoke, but I do get the rare strong urge, at which point I contact an Ex smoker I met on this website who had become a sort of a sponsor for me :)

She talked me off a ledge a couple of times. What Anne says is simple but true. Do not smoke and over time maybe a year or two urges might disappear all together or will be rare and light. Having said that, it can only happen with the right attitude. If you feel you are missing something, you will always want to smoke.

Dust yourself off. be on this site as much as possible. re-read material here to strengthen your resolve to rid yourself from a deadly addiction,  Join the June 2022 quitters group. You have 9 months under your belt, you can do it again!

In reply toRe: msg 16
Molly010

From: Molly010

Jun-18

Hey Lee,

There is something strange during months 8 - 11 that many of us went through the first year.  I was fortunate that I did not relapse but noticed many others did during the year I quit.  As Anne said, the most important thing is don't smoke.  I know that sounds ridiculous but the "nicodemon" will always rear its ugly head telling you that you "have to smoke."  Logically, you know that you don't because you didn't smoke for months.  Dance, cry, scream, get mad, walk, talk to yourself, get crazy, but don't smoke.  

My group tried to focus on getting angry when the cravings happened instead of panicking that we couldn't live without a cig.  Think of cravings like a demon who is saying all the right things to get you to sell your soul to a product that is killing you.  That is really what this addiction is.  Cigarettes are like a conman.  He makes you think you will feel better if you just had one cigarette knowing it has the potential to ruin your health.

Don't be too hard on yourself.  Many of us have quit a gazillion times before it stuck and I know many who relapsed after months of quitting.  There really is no "safe" time to have a cig once you quit.  Doesn't matter if you have quit for 2 weeks or 2 years.  One cigarette will suck you back in to an addiction where the only thing you think about is being at the same place you were before you relapsed.  Get up.  Dust yourself off and get back in the fight.  You can do this.  Good luck!

Molly

Quit August 1, 2018

In reply toRe: msg 20
Lee.T

From: Lee.T

Jun-19

Thanks Molly. I have got myself into such a state  about  having  smoked again that I'm suffering with extreme anxiety so much so that I'm battling to breath. It has really affected me so badly that  I'm constantly thinking I'm not going to be able to stop and this is causing me to  get anxious.  I just so hope I get loads of messages ftom people to keep reading to stay positive and to keep my mind off the negative thoughts I'm having. I'm going to give it my all and hope the anxiety  stays away

In reply toRe: msg 21
Molly010

From: Molly010

Jun-19

I think all of us at one point or another never thought we could live without smoking.  It is okay to feel what you are feeling and power through it.  There will come a time when you will want to quit more than you want to smoke.  That time is different for everyone and you may not be ready.  Smokers go through their whole lives knowing they "should" quit.  I never met a smoker who said, "Smoking is great."  Always trying to find a place to smoke, waiting a few minutes before going inside a place so I didn't smell too bad, checking to see if I had enough for the day and arguing with my boyfriend.  Smoking created more anxiety for me than quitting and I didn't even realize it.

What also helped me start to get in the mindset was a book by Allen Carr "Easy Way to Stop Smoking."  He advises you to smoke while you read the book because he gets it.  It doesn't work for everyone, but it made me look at smoking differently than I had before.  And check in on the forum even if you continue to smoke.  The support is really important.  

In reply toRe: msg 21
xvaper

From: xvaper

Jun-19

Hi Lee,

As with all addictions, some people will relapse. That does not mean they are trapped forever. There is no point beating yourself up or panicking it won't help you in any way. Try to look at things another way. You still can quit again, if you really want to. Millions have done, so can you. You know now that it is possible because you were clean for a significant amount of time. That is the good news. you KNOW you can. Set a new date and let's roll.

Have you read the free ebook freedom from nicotine?

https://whyquit.com/ffn/

It has a lot of good information that can open your eyes to things you did not know or considered before. The website also has many videos and reading materials.

I also suggest watching this 3 part very old but brilliant documentary, called the tobacco wars.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iplzsMazQz4&t=1s&ab_channel=AndyBerndt

It totally opened my eyes about the subject of tobacco (=nicotine) addiction , by seeing the real story, the bigger picture. Learning how tobacco was doggedly inserted into our lives by conscienceless  and remorseless financial giants, who are counting on us to pay them to kill ourselves. It certainly motivated me in my quit.

You are not alone, you can escape the trap and stay free. We are here to support you.

In reply toRe: msg 21
Anne2020

From: Anne2020

Jun-20

Don't worry Lee, its just a bump in the road to recovery.  You can make it - don't give up on yourself.  YOU CAN DO THIS.  If you can convince yourself that you like smoking, then you can convince yourself that you hate smoking.

And just as Molly pointed out, one day it will 'feel normal not to smoke'.

You are winning.  Keep chugging along, and you will make it.  This is a life long lifestyle commitment and no bumps are going to keep you from moving forward, no matter what.   

In reply toRe: msg 16
AnnieXS

From: AnnieXS

Jun-22

Hi Lee:

Do some slow, diaphragm breathing.  As someone who relapsed too many times to count before I finally stuck my quit, I still remember feeling the same exact way.  I would be overwhelmed with extreme anxiety and would feel like I was never going to be able quit.

You went 9 months so you are very capable of doing this.  There is a thread hiding somewhere on this forum that was for the tricky 8-11 months I believe they called it.  There is an entire thread dedicated this it so it is a thing.  When I hit 8 months I suddenly felt like I had just quit again and was climbing the walls craving a cig.  I had an awesome support group that talked me off of the ledge a few times during that time period.  Always remember to come here when you feel like you're going to cave.  The forum isn't as active as it once was but I know people will show up for you.

You can do it again, and for good.  Just remind yourself, intensely when needed :), that you want to quit more than you want to smoke.  I've read a lot of good advise in this thread.  I did yoga morning and night.  Meditation is also great (I admit to having difficulty with this practice but if you can get in the zone, it's amazing).  Go for walks if you're able.  Go back through all of the articles on this site to keep yourself focused on your quit and all of the benefits that go along with it.

Know you are not alone.  I believe most all of us on this forum have been in your shoes and have succumbed to the torturous games nicotine addiction plays with our minds.  Think about being free from it.  It took me about 14 months to feel like myself again.  It is not a quick journey, but a worthwhile one when you finally free yourself.

I should participate more often, but I still come back and read to keep it green.  Some people don't want to come back once they've quit, but I believe others, like myself, need a continual reminder of the struggles involved so we never have that "just one" moment again.

Don't give up.  You can do this!

AnnieXS

Quit May 8, 2015

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