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July 2022 Ex-Smokers    Quit Buddies Unite

Started 7/24/22 by Denim50; 10195 views.

Great job Anthony!  Hey, we are all human and sh*t happens!  Keep up the great work and welcome back to being smoke free!

tonypfan

From: tonypfan

Oct-13

Cindi:  Thank you for your kind words.  They mean a lot to me.  Anthony

In reply toRe: msg 131
tonypfan

From: tonypfan

Oct-19

Good morning:  I remain smoke free once again.  My Quit date, looking back at my journal, is July 15,2022.  When I was on my kayak retreat I let my cravings get the best of me and spent several days smoking.  I was soooo bummed out and afraid I would go for years before quitting once again.  My fears were groundless.  Fortunately, I have enough experience and knowledge below my belt that I got back into the swing of things and have not smoked since .  I hate the word relapse.  And I consider it unfair to myself to set the clock back to zero.  The fact is that I had no cigarettes for about 95% of the time for the past three months.  So rather than feeling like Sisyphus who pushed the rock almost to the top of the mountain, only to have it slide all the way back to the bottom, such that he had to start all over again, I have decided to keep my birthday of July 15th.  Some people may accuse me of dishonesty.  I consider it self compassion.  My “relapse” was a teachable moment.  I have learned from it and I consider it part and parcel of the stop smoking journey.  

Those few days of smoking were not pleasurable.  I felt disappointed.  But I noticed that my nicotine addiction did not come crashing down over me, crushing my spirit or wiping out all the progress I have made from previous quits.  Nor did it result in my continuing to smoke.  I remain wise and I remain free.

This is my story.  I am sticking to it.  I continue to utilize my tool kit to remain free: meditation, holotropic. Breathing, reading the Why Quit book, and perusing this website.  

But, above all, I feel my greatest accomplishment thus far has been, not starting again, but , relatively quickly, picking myself up and walking on myt smoke free path.  Anthony

JavaNY

From: JavaNY

Oct-19

Yes, Tony. It's disappointing but the time spent without tobacco helps you restart. Glad you learned from it.

Paul

Jerthie123

From: Jerthie123

Nov-9

Hey Tony.. Great job at recovering from your minor relapse. And great outlook on how not all is lost! A very courageous attitude indeed! I use nicotine lozenges. I am using 6 a day, down from 12 a day. It might seem like a half assed effort at quitting nicotine completely, but it is working for me. I suffer from mild anxiety and depression. I also have bipolar disorder. All of this was made worse recently with extreme changes in my personal life. I can honestly say that this past summer into October were some very very difficult months for me emotionally. What I noticed though was that using the lozenges began to exasperate the anxiety instead of appease it. The more I gave in to the urge to suck a lozenge the more disappointed in myself I felt. The more anxious I got. The more miserable I became. It is like you said in your above post. Your brief return to smoking was not enjoyable. Using the lozenges this past summer I no longer found enjoyable, it was like I was sucking on them just to be over the act of sucking on them. Today I have only had 4 lozenges. Two weeks ago at this time, I would have had 10 by now. So I am doing okay! I just wanted to say that your post strengthened and encouraged me and gave me a feeling of connection. Thank you for sharing!!

tonypfan

From: tonypfan

Nov-9

Jerthie:  What a heart felt post you sent me.  I was gratified and pleased that my former post inspired you.  Just as yours does to me.  Glad you are becoming self aware about the negative effects of the lozaenges.  Trust your intuition.  You have an exceedingly positive attitude.  Let it carry you forward on your road to freedom from nicotine.  Best to you.  Anthony

Jerthie123

From: Jerthie123

Nov-9

Self aware. That is a good way to describe the way I have improved myself, Tony, by reducing my nicotine intake with hopes to one day be free of the lozenges for good. Self aware. Yes indeed! Will write more at another time. Only 5 today instead of 6. At this time 2 weeks ago I would have had 11 or 12. Baby steps and this forum is keeping me going! How is your quit going?

tonypfan

From: tonypfan

Nov-10

Baby steps are good.  One step at a time, one day at a time.  My Quit is going splendidly well, Jerthie.  I hardly ever think about wanting to smoke.  Finally!!!!  Keep up with your self-awareness.  You’re on the right. Path.  Anthony

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