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Hello   Introductions/Newcomers Nook

Started Aug-27 by Ainthavinit; 2188 views.
Ainthavinit

From: Ainthavinit

Aug-27

Hi my names Andrew and I’m sick of smoking and relapse…….I found myself here because, I found a interesting article on the mental aspects of smoking and after many failed attempts I have come to realise it is the mental aspects that are always my down fall…….I fully understand that for me there is no pain to stopping smoking, pain is a broken arm for example……So I can stop quite easily……..But the mental aspects are so cruel, my cravings don’t seem to dwindle away they seem to solidify over time……..I realise I have to get on top of the mental aspects to succeed……..I am not a weak individual, but in my mind not being able to break through this mental anguish makes me feel weak, thus ashamed, paranoid, emotional and pathetic……I’ve so much to live for, I surf, kite surf, I have a beautiful family, I have six dogs and I’m a director of my own thriving company……..I have achieved one of my life goals of doing ‘what I want as and when I want’. I now want to break the smoking cycle…….I know for a fact that it’s my immensely strong mental associations that keep the cravings escalating, the smoke after a kite, stood out in the barn on a cold winters night with a cup of tea and a smoke, watching my son surf on the cliff top with a smoke, fishing, working in the office when the Irish rain beats down……..It’s ruining my life, a surfer of all people needs there lungs, I’m now 50 and getting so frustrated with loseing paddle power………Just writing this down has already helped immensely, I now feel so fricking angry with myself, angry that I’ve let so much opportunity and potential slip……..I’m ready, smoking means nothing to me…….I call on anybody willing to help and remind me that’s it’s just mental conditioning to step up when and if the time comes, it would be hugely appreciated……….Yours Andrew

candrew

From: candrew

Aug-27

this is andrew. same name, different person

wow, I just read your post and i must say that you are very clear about your issues

the message rings true to my whole approach regarding this problem

i must print it to understand your entire message

i'll be in touch 

Andrew

dancin'

Hi Andrew and welcome to the Forum,

Yes you are correct that 99% of quitting smoking is mental.  I believe they say the physical addiction from nicotine is almost gone after 3 days and the rest is mental.  My final quit that I succeeded at 4+ years ago was because (like you) I just got angry.  Smoking had robbed so much from me for 35+ years...physically, emotionally, and mentally.  I had tried to quit many times before then but was still romancing the notion that cigarettes were my "friend" and something I needed to calm myself or relax.  To help overcome these ridiculous notions, I just started reading and fueling my thoughts, giving me the power to fight through the cravings.  But the one thing that is very important is Do Not Smoke.  Just one puff will send you back to square one.  Once the receptors in your brain start shutting down, the cravings will become less and less.  It just takes time.

Here are some articles that have helped me so much in my quit journey (deep breathing was huge for me):

Best of luck to you as your start your journey.  You can do this!

Ainthavinit

From: Ainthavinit

Aug-27

Hello Andrew thanks so much for your time to comment.

I know my issues for fact, but it still doesn’t change the fact that they win out time and again……..I’ve stopped and started so many times now, I’ve been able to whittle down the crux of the issue……For me it’s mental, there’s so many past associations and believe it or not associations that I create for the future……For example, even since I was boy I’ve visualised me as an old man white beard sat fishing smoking a pipe……..

That is exactly how one creates a reality, visualisation……I now find it nearly impossible to visualise myself otherwise………But this is that mental side of things hey…….

I’ve got to admit I’ve started to relish the process…….A problem is simply an un-solved solution……I am sure I have the solution now…….

I literally have to change who I think I am and who I wish to become.

Again thanks so much for hearing my thoughts and replying in kind, it’s hugely appreciated…….

Yours Andrew

candrew

From: candrew

Aug-27

Hey man,

I think I understand what you are trying to say. Your thoughts, even though relevant lose me in your supporting statements, I would advise you to keep it simple (as they say in AA).

Addiction is a complex animal. There are no rules, it has to be delt with in a way to silence those bad thoughts.

the negative thoughts and visualize yourself as a non-smoker. My credo "Í just don't smoke (and drink) anymore"" PERIOD! Simple but to the point. Effective for me.

Like yourself I have quit thousands of times. T tried cold turkey, Wellbutrin, hypnosis, 

IV Medication, this site and other stuff I can't remember, all for not.

smoked since I was 16. A lot of years of abuse. 

Happily smoke-free for, I think, for 3 months. 

Stay in touch, I'm headed for the hot tub, helps with the craviings.

Good day,

Andrew

In reply toRe: msg 5
candrew

From: candrew

Aug-27

From: candrew

4:25 PM

Hey man,

I think I understand what you are trying to say. Your thoughts, even though relevant lose me in your supporting statements, I would advise you to keep it simple (as they say in AA).

Addiction is a complex animal. There are no rules, it has to be delt with in a way to silence those bad thoughts.

the negative thoughts and visualize yourself as a non-smoker. My credo "Í just don't smoke (and drink) anymore"" PERIOD! Simple but to the point. Effective for me.

Like yourself I have quit thousands of times. T tried cold turkey, Wellbutrin, hypnosis, 

IV Medication, this site and other stuff I can't remember, all for not.

smoked since I was 16. A lot of years of abuse. 

Happily smoke-free for, I think, for 3 months. 

Stay in touch, I'm headed for the hot tub, helps with the craviings.

Good day,

Andrew

tonypfan

From: tonypfan

Aug-28

Andrew:  Your post resonated with me.  My Quit is July 17th, 2022.  I am into my second month already and feel like a new man:  physically, mentally and spiritually.  Like you I used to consider myself a weakling because the nicotine addiction craving always won despite my best intentions.  And I have always been an avid exerciser (even as a smoker) and would berate myself for how I was abusing my body through nicotine smoke. 

For me, Andrew, staying connected to this Forum has meant all the difference for me.  I do not post all that frequently but I for sure read various posts 3 to 4 times per week.  And  Loreficent, a forum member, posted a pdf copy of an awesome book called WhyQujit.  I have found that reading non smoking literature is also very helpful to keep up my motivation.  Especially in the beginning.  

My biggest fear was that if I quit I would never be happy.  That I NEEDED cigarettes to fulfill me.  Yes, this is total brain washing.  As Alan Carr wrote:  Smoking does absolutely nothing for us.  I realize that is the truth.  But one must initially counter the brainwashing.  This forum helps you stay committed and lifts you up while you go through your Quit.  

Thank you for your very honest post.  Anthony

AnnieXS

From: AnnieXS

Aug-28

Hi Andrew: 

I, like you, quit and relapsed more times than I can count.  You are definitely on the right track with your thought process.  Simply put, you have to want to quit more than you want to smoke which means you will have to recondition your mind to stop romanticizing the ritual, thinking of quitting as a deprivation, and see it for the hardcore drug addiction it truly is.  When I found this site and read all of the amazing and helpful articles, it made me realize I didn't have a special relationship with my cigs, it was my body craving more nicotine the moment I put one out.  I was simply feeding the beast.  I started to get "the cough" and my breathing began to get shallow when doing yoga (probably from those deep inhales after smoking a cig... crazy... a smoking yogi).  One day that switch finally went off and I wanted to quit more than I wanted to smoke.  I was 50, so at the same point in life you are.

Everyone is different, but for me, it took 12-14 months to feel like myself again.  I wouldn't discount the physical side of it either.  I believe your body goes through many adjustments in that first year and beyond if you've smoked for many years.  It is a roller coaster ride for sure.  I quit cold turkey and I always say it was one of the hardest things I've ever done.  As a smoker, your mind revolves around your next cig, from the time you wake up until you close your eyes.  You need to figure out what to do with all of that free mental time, amongst so many other things you've associated with smoking over the years.  It is a journey, but one that is well worth it in the long term.

With the support of this great forum, I can officially declare myself a non-smoker.  I believe I succeeded by staying close to this site with all of the great people who will listen and respond to anything you have to say, without judgement.  I never thought I could shake this addiction, so if I can do it, you can, too.  You just have to change your mind.  That's the biggest hurdle which you have already figured out. :)

You can do this!

AnnieXS

Quit May 8, 2015    

  • Edited August 28, 2022 2:27 pm  by  AnnieXS
In reply toRe: msg 1
Douglas8845

From: Douglas8845

Aug-28

As Andrew I said "My credo "Í just don't smoke (and drink) anymore"" PERIOD! Simple but to the point."

My credo was "No matter hkw awful I feel, no matter how powerful the craving becomes, I will never smoke again. Period."

And here I am, ten  years later, kidney donor to my brother, an inspiration to my family.  I did it and so can you.

candrew

From: candrew

Aug-28

Douglas

I have seen your seen your posts before. You are an inspiration to all of us. I'm glad you continue to post after 10 years. You make the possibility to quit within reach. This site means a lot to me because no matter where people are in their process to quit, one can learn from their peers by posting and reading on Delphi.

Ten years is incredible, I pray for the ability to keep my quit alive. Ten years, 10 weeks, 10 days wherever we are in our process it's people like you that give us a ray of hope, that being we can do it! Smoking sucks and we can all agree that it has to stop. 

Just some thoughts for tonight. 

Andrew

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