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This community is open to all who are recovering from nicotine addiction.

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Day 1again!   Introductions/Newcomers Nook

Started May-5 by Devildog2147; 7004 views.
candrew

From: candrew

May-15

Eastern - Like New York

In reply toRe: msg 9
xvaper

From: xvaper

May-15

Hi CandrewDevildog2147,

Congratulations for deciding to give it a go. You have nothing to lose and its free! Like Lori said, there is no size fits all. 

I quit cold turkey 10.5 months ago. For me, apart from the support from the people here without which I would not have made it, the educational material I found here is eye-opening.  Understanding the chemistry and the brain and how this fosters addiction helped me a lot, but it takes many reading and rereading to let it sink in and not let your addict brain to suppress this information, since that's is its job, to keep the supply coming. Re-reading/watching is the key.

I recommend starting here :https://whyquit.com/ffn/

this a free ebook but this site has so much more video and reading material.

MarthaJC

From: MarthaJC

May-18

I won't be able to post tomorrow or Friday so I'm posting today. I quit smoking cold turkey a bit over 5 months ago, when I came down with Covid. The end of a habit I picked up in the early 1970's -- with periods of quitting along the way. It's different this time, I think because my involvement with this forum has resulted in me acknowledging the power of this addiction. Yes I've always known that nicotine is addictive, but I really didn't think one puff was off the table. So for me, the only way to keep this quit going is to do like recovering alcoholics do, and simply not smoke today. I don't need to ponder a life without smoking, I don't need to play mind games with myself about it, I actually can choose to think about other, positive things. I'm not smoking today, and my heart and lungs are sure happy about it. I wish you all the best!!

In reply toRe: msg 9
candrew

From: candrew

May-19

Well, its May 9th and this is my last day  of smoking per my agreement that I made 2 weeks ago. 

Forty years is a long time. My relationship with nicotine has been never ending except for a few brief periods of quitting. I never thought that I would still be lighting up this long, oh how the time passes so quickly as I age. It only seems like yesterday that I smoked my first  cig. I was so brainwashed that I never felt that it was a bad thing. But through the years I realized that I couldn't just quit, that I had to have my fix daily to feel normal. 

I grew up in the 60's and 70's when the mindset was "If it feels good, do it". Smoking was my expression of that attitude. I was a proud smoker and nobody could tell me any different. Fast forward to the 2000's. Smoking is no longer acceptable yet I continue to do it for what reason? The reason is that I am simply a weak addict feeding an insasible appetite for my drug of choice. No better or worse that the common herion addict who lives for the their next fix to avoid impending withdrawl. 

All the reasons that we think that we smoke take a back seat to the real and singlemost factor called nicotine withdrawl. All of us have run out of cigerettes only to find a way to replenish our supply as soon as possible. Above and beyond anything else we may be doing, getting more of the drug is the priority.

Sound familar? No matter how much time we waste, money we spend, risk our health, smoking dominates every facet of our lives. Crazy, yes! But we continue to live this insanity each and every day.

Tommorow is my commitment to ending the insanity.

Good day to all.

N.O.P.E. for tomorrow.

Andrew

In reply toRe: msg 14
candrew

From: candrew

May-19

Spelling correction for message 14

Thanks,

Andrew

In reply toRe: msg 15
candrew

From: candrew

May-19

Spelling correction for message 14

Well, its May 9th and this is my last day  of smoking per my agreement that I made 2 weeks ago. 

Forty years is a long time. My relationship with nicotine has been never ending except for a few brief periods of quitting. I never thought that I would still be lighting up this long, oh how the time passes so quickly as I age. It only seems like yesterday that I smoked my first  cig. I was so brainwashed that I never felt that it was a bad thing. But through the years I realized that I couldn't just quit, that I had to have my fix daily to feel normal. 

I grew up in the 60's and 70's when the mindset was "If it feels good, do it". Smoking was my expression of that attitude. I was a proud smoker and nobody could tell me any different. Fast forward to the 2000's. Smoking is no longer acceptable yet I continue to do it for what reason? The reason is that I am simply a weak addict feeding an insatiable appetite for my drug of choice. No better or worse that the common heroin addict who lives for their next fix to avoid impending withdrawal. 

All the reasons that we think that we smoke take a back seat to the real and single most factor called nicotine withdrawal. All of us have run out of cigarettes only to find a way to replenish our supply as soon as possible. Above and beyond anything else we may be doing, getting more of the drug is the priority.

Sound familiar? No matter how much time we waste, money we spend, or risk our health, smoking dominates every facet of our lives. Crazy, yes! But we continue to live this insanity each and every day.

Tomorrow is my commitment to ending the insanity.

Good day to all.

N.O.P.E. for tomorrow.

Andrew

Anne2020

From: Anne2020

May-19

Forgive me but, do you mean its May 19th?  

Loreficent

From: Loreficent

May-19

Good morning Andrew

Morning here still. It’s funny how time seems to be such an arbitrary thing. Living by a clock. Hmmm. Reality is that it is the moment it is no matter where you are. Clock says it is a different time for me than you, but take the clock out of it and we are in the same moment. Hmmm. Where am I going with this? joy Not sure, but I started writing because I had a feeling of being in the moment when I read what you wrote, but that feeling isn’t articulating easily. I think the point may have been something about time. It’s crazy how it flies by. 40 years is a long time to smoke for sure. It’s to that point where we seriously question whether it is worth stopping. That’s the addict voice, certainly. And it’s no wonder really. Saying it’s difficult to let it go, well, we all know the understatement that is. Truth is that first step is the absolute most difficult and the easiest all at the same time. We make the decision, take the step, and, if we persevere, are able to look back with some hindsight and see it wasn’t as bad as we thought it was gonna be.
The problem lies in the fact that there remains a part of us that is and always will be addicts. It sucks. Plain and simple, it just sucks. It takes complete and utter acceptance of that fact. And it takes being able to separate that voice from all of our other facets. Focus and separate and sit with. We are able to hang onto that for a moment and the struggle in the mind ensues as the addict voice lures us into a thousand reasons, sometimes all at once, and before we know it it feels impossibly overwhelming and we look frantically for something to hang on to to get past that one split second decision to light up. Wowza. It’s exhausting to think about. Such an amazing amount of energy we spend in the struggle. And time…well it just keeps on going along. It always will. It’s gonna keep going whether we smoke or not. 
You’ve got a good plan going. Commit. You have 4 weeks of patches. Do it. Put it on and let it go. You. Can. Do. Anything. For. Four. Weeks. Just commit to that time, be in it, let the time go on by and don’t even think beyond that. No reason to go there. Be in the moment you are in and just be. Force yourself to stay right exactly in the moment you’re in. That strategy has gotten me through oh so much. I started using it when I went into the Army a long time ago now. Was all stressed about how the heck I would get through Basic Training. But I was committed. Had signed on the dotted line. No way out. So I set my mind I could do anything  for 8 weeks. And I did. Since then that strategy has become quite useful. It took me a long time to get to the point to apply it to quitting smoking. My addict piece, as all of ours are, is incredibly strong. Somehow I got to the point where I could call it out, separate it, and start to assemble all of the other pieces inside me and align them together and look at that one addict piece and tell it that I was gonna do this. One day at a time. For 6 weeks of the first patch I went at it one day at a time. It was two weeks less than Basic Training so I knew I could do it. Then after that I reset the clock. Fast forward, here we are. 
I don’t have any clue how I got to all this nattering. Bottom line is the time is gonna go by no matter what. You either wear time out or it wears you out. Wise friend told me that once. Hang onto that. Wear time out. Run the effing race and win. The only one in the competition with you is you. We are all here on the sidelines, cheering you on. 

candrew

From: candrew

May-19

yes - it is may 19

i've been a space kadet since my stroke 4 years ago

tomorrow is may 20 - my quit date

andrew

Anne2020

From: Anne2020

May-19

I get my dates mixed up all of the time as well.  If I may suggest, try not to think about it.  Just go on with your day knowing that you no longer smoke.  Convince yourself that not smoking is not a struggle but a blessing.  You still have your life - you can still choose to not smoke.  All you need to do is make an adjustment in your thinking whenever you think about smoking.  Distract yourself with something else - a shower, hot bath, or exercise.  A bowl of ice cream, a cold glass of apple juice or perhaps even a popsicle.  Give yourself something else instead of that stupid cigarette.  You only have to out smart yourself, so think of ways that you can make yourself happy without lighting up.  You have done this before so you know what to expect.  This time, you are going to make it all the way.  

We are here to cheer you on.  You can depend on us to have your back.

You CAN do this.  If you WANT TO.

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