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The Commodore 128   Home Computing

Started May-13 by CDP (PerraultC); 196 views.
CDP (PerraultC)
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From: CDP (PerraultC)

May-13

I remember when I was a kid, there was a Service Merchandise department store  in my town and I always liked going in their to play around with the Commodore 64 and 128 computers that were on display.  The 128 looked interesting to me, but I wasn't really up on the specs at the time. I assumed it was much better than the 64 and it 'looked' great with a better keyboard/case.

But the 128 soon disappeared and I remember reading about how it failed but I never understood why. Now I revisit the history of the Commodor 128 and it appears that from a technical standpoint it was actually a solid machine with few faults.

From what I'm gathering from the Wikipedia article, the 128 was a victim of a couple problems:

1) A lack of original titles

The 128 boasted full compatibiliy with the 64 and did a pretty good job backing this up, so at the very least, if you bought this machine you could still run your Commodore 64 software assuming you were upgrading. Problem is, there wasn't a large selection of titles specific to the 128, meaning they weren't letting it reach it's potential.

2) Timing

When the 8-bit Commodore 128 was released, it was at the tail end of the 8-bit era and during a time when 16/32 bit machines were hitting the market. It could be used for both  home computing, gaming, and business use. The probem is, businesses were already committed to PCs and clones, and Commodore 64 and Amiga users were perfectly  happy with their systems and didn't feel a need to make a jump from where they were. There just wasn't enough pie available for the 128.

Did anyone here have the fortune of owning a Commodore 128? What was your experience?

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CDP (PerraultC)
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From: CDP (PerraultC)

May-13

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CDP (PerraultC)
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From: CDP (PerraultC)

May-14

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CDP (PerraultC)
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From: CDP (PerraultC)

May-14

HWPeeler (HPeeler)

From: HWPeeler (HPeeler)

May-16

I liked the VIC-20 AND C-64. Access to the bus made it more adaptable than other stuff. It just couldn't compete with the IBM.

CDP (PerraultC)
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From: CDP (PerraultC)

May-17

The Commodore 64 was a great choice for a home machine (many argued it rivaled the PC early on). But in the business sector? Unfortunately that wasn't even a discusssion.

Even though I didn't own them, I liked the Apple II and Commodore machines because they had distinctive  'personalities' about them. People who owned them swore by them (generally). There were others two, but in home computing those were the big  favorites before everything became homogenized.

HWPeeler (HPeeler)

From: HWPeeler (HPeeler)

May-17

The Apple II was big for it's time, but once Intel got into the market with the x86 stuff they just ran over everybody. An impact of how the military market can influence things. The x86 design was not made for personal computing but boy did it find a home in missiles. The need for speed was pushed by the military. Home computers didn't really need it. Once it existed everybody bought it.

I really don't need gigahertz speed for anything I do. Using ORCAD I can't tell the difference with a single, dual or quad processor. But what else is there to buy?

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