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Khaled Ahmed Sectarian War History   Lecture and Books

Started 9/2/20 by NYCKGB; 1131 views.
NYCKGB

From: NYCKGB

9/2/20

Sectarian War: Pakistan's Sunni-Shia Violence and its links to the Middle East

OUP Pakistan, Aug. 2, 2012 - Political Science

The book is an account of how the Shia-Sunni conflict was relocated from the Middle East to Pakistan after the rise of Revolutionary Iran in 1979, through the mediating agency of the rulers in Pakistan and the proliferation of the religious seminaries funded by Saudi Arabia. It examines the death of General Zia in the context of the sectarian conflict, goes into the process of production of apostatising fatwas in Pakistan followed by violent action by organizations formed from the non-state actors used by the state for its covert wars. It also delves into the state of the Shia communities in the Middle East and their historical connections with South Asia. It examines the rise of Shia culture in Lucknow and its formative influence on the rise of the Shia in Iraq, with a parallel scrutiny of the rise of Wahhabism and its infiltration of India in the eighteenth century. It records the origins and history of organisations doing sectarian terrorism in Pakistan and their linkages to Al Qaeda whose trajectory into a sectarian identity is also traced to the rise of Al Zarqawi as a parallel leader in Iraq. The book facilitates an understanding of the phenomenon of terrorism in Pakistan today.

https://www.amazon.com/Khaled-Ahmed/e/B0036C7U48%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share

In reply toRe: msg 1
NYCKGB

From: NYCKGB

9/2/20

Conversations with History: Khaled Ahmed

Posted on 31 Jan 2008

University of California Television (UCTV)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTChUWg9fEE

On this edition of Conversations with History, UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler is joined by guest Khaled Ahmed,  one of the best known political analysts writing in the Pakistani press, to discuss Pakistan and Islamic Fundamentalism. Series: "Conversations with History"

[7/2002] [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Show ID: 6570]

wave

In reply toRe: msg 1
BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

9/2/20

NYCKGB said:

Sectarian War: Pakistan's Sunni-Shia Violence and its links to the Middle East OUP Pakistan, Aug. 2, 2012 - Political Science The book is an account of how the Shia-Sunni conflict was relocated from the Middle East to Pakistan after the rise of Revolutionary Iran in 1979, through the mediating agency of the rulers in Pakistan and the proliferation of the religious seminaries funded by Saudi Arabia. ... The book facilitates an understanding of the phenomenon of terrorism in Pakistan today. https://www.amazon.com/Khaled-Ahmed/e/B0036C7U48%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share

8 years old and not a single review in Amazon US or Amazon UK.

And its likely to be a pack of lies - Sunni/Shia was never the problem that Catholic/Protestant was for 500 years in Christian societies.

In reply toRe: msg 2
BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

9/2/20

NYCKGB said:

On this edition of Conversations with History, UC Berkeley's Harry Kreisler is joined by guest Khaled Ahmed,  one of the best known political analysts writing in the Pakistani press, to discuss Pakistan and Islamic Fundamentalism. Series: "Conversations with History"

Nobody minds you pumping the books and views of a little known author - but if he's speaking in the US, then its likely he's being paid to divide Muslims and get a lot of people killed.

NYCKGB

From: NYCKGB

9/2/20

8 years old and not a single review in Amazon US or Amazon UK. And its likely to be a pack of lies - Sunni/Shia was never the problem that Catholic/Protestant was for 500 years in Christian societies.

Most of the people I know have read his books, I'm not a Christian so don't give me the old meaculpa rhetoric, it's useless... SHIA/SUNNI have been slaughtering each other over 1.400 years

The Sunni-Shia Divide | What's Behind The Conflict?‎

Learn more about the roots of the Sunni-Shia conflict in this interactive guide. From the Council on Foreign Relations. Explore Now.

Feb 19, 2014 - The vicious schism between Sunni and Shia has been poisoning Islam for ... Muslims are on one side of the disagreement and Shia Muslims on the other. ... The two Christian denominations had a shared history for 1500 years. ... Yet for much of the 1,400 years since the death of the Prophet the majority of ..

NYCKGB

From: NYCKGB

9/2/20

Maybe it's unkown to you, and most of the backward people are

Khaled Ahmed, Consulting Editor Daily Times and The Friday Times, with a 30-year career in journalism, has written on the ideology and politics of Pakistan. From 1991 to 1993 he was one of the founder members of Indo-Pak Neemrana Dialogue, track-two diplomacy.

https://www.libertybooks.com/index.php?route=product/author&author_id=15686

Sylveria

From: Sylveria

9/2/20

IS THAT ANYWHERE NEAR ANYONE;'S FAULT?

Director Amjad Khan's film Gul Makai, based on Pakistani education activist and Nobel laureate Malala Yousafzai, is set to release soon. The filmmaker has received a fatwa from a Noida-based Muslim cleric for disrespecting the Quran.

https://forums.delphiforums.com/sandgrain/messages/2254/1

In reply toRe: msg 5
BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

10/2/20

NYCKGB said:

SHIA/SUNNI have been slaughtering each other over 1.400 years

No it hasn't. Certainly far less so than schisms in Christianity.

It is said (difficult to check) that Shia and Sunni often used to share mosques. Extremely rare in Christianity.

BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

10/2/20

Sylveria said:

IS THAT ANYWHERE NEAR ANYONE;'S FAULT?

I'm just telling you - 8 years old and not a single review in Amazon US or Amazon UK.

And its likely to be a pack of lies.

Sectarian War: Pakistan's Sunni-Shia Violence and its links to the Middle East OUP Pakistan, Aug. 2, 2012 - Political Science The book is an account of how the Shia-Sunni conflict was relocated from the Middle East to Pakistan after the rise of Revolutionary Iran in 1979, through the mediating agency of the rulers in Pakistan and the proliferation of the religious seminaries funded by Saudi Arabia. ... The book facilitates an understanding of the phenomenon of terrorism in Pakistan today. https://www.amazon.com/Khaled-Ahmed/e/B0036C7U48%3Fref=dbs_a_mng_rwt_scns_share

funiki

From: funiki

10/2/20

Pakistan's Sunni-Shia Violence

japanese_goblin
Sectarian Divide | 101 East


Sectarian violence between extremist members of Pakistan's majority Sunni and minority Shia communities has resulted in the deaths of thousands of people since the 1980s.

Al Jazeera English 13 Sep 2013

More from 101 East on:

Pakistan: Sectarian Divide
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N68o2PD0YMo

Analysts say Pakistan is increasingly becoming the battleground in a proxy war between Saudi Arabia and Iran.

They claim the bulk of the violence more recently has been committed against the Shia community.

Bomb blasts this year alone have killed hundreds of Shias, with Sunni hardline group Lashkar-e-Jhangvi claiming responsibility for most of the violence.

The extremist group has an openly anti-Shia agenda and is banned in Pakistan. It is classified as a terrorist organisation by several Western nations.

Rights group Amnesty International says the Shia Hazara community is particularly vulnerable to being targeted. The Hazara tribe is ethnically Mongolian and its people have oriental features that make them easily identifiable from the rest of the country's population

So, can the Pakistani authorities protect its minorities and if so how?

101 East speaks with the families of victims of sectarian violence, from Pakistan's Shia as well as Sunni communities. We also speak with Hazaras who have survived attacks in Quetta, and those who are fleeing the insecurity they face while living there. We film with counter-terror police and the government and talk to them about efforts to end sectarian violence.

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