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What Are You Working On Now?   General Discussion

Started 11/19/17 by MarciainMD; 209383 views.
judyinohio

From: judyinohio

Feb-26

That is very kind of you to offer to give me more old denim, Cathy, but I am quite sure that I have enough on hand. I do not want to fall into a trap of making a huge monster of a denim quilt that I cannot "wrassle" under the needle of Cecil Faye.

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

Feb-26

Finished the next Hawaiian Applique block.... this is the first of the lavendar batiks.

Your Hawaiian blocks are so beautiful!  You might have mentioned earlier .... and I may have missed it.  However, can I ask what method of appliqué you're using for these ?

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

Feb-26

Patricia Drew (PatriciaDrew) said:

However, can I ask what method of appliqué you're using for these ?

These are all needleturn applique.

To give you some background, for ages and ages I avoided applique.  Generally speaking, I don't care for machine applies.  I don't like the look of the tight machine satin stitching and machine blanket/buttonhole stitching has a limited use (for me).   And with *extremely* few exceptions, I don't care for fusible appliques.  Yup, there's a very narrow band of acceptance and I will freely admit to that.

Over the years, I have tried all sorts of hand applique techniques and, for one reason or another, rejected them all.  Too complicated.  Too many steps.  Too fussy.  Too tedious.  Whatever.

THEN .. I "discovered" a line of patterns by Nancy Lee Chong of Pacific Rim Quilting Company.  This line of patterns is called "2 Fabric Applique".  Nancy gives you several different techniques, both machine and hand, in the pattern but the one I chose to do was her needleturn.  It was a completely different approach for me.  She has you trace the finished design onto the front of the applique fabric.  You place the marked applique fabric on top of the base fabric, both right sides up.  You secure the applique fabric to the base fabric with rather large kinda/sorta basting stitches, stitching right on the marked (finished) line.   In this manner, the applique is absolutely attached to the base fabric and positively can NOT be moved around.  There are no pins to stick you or catch your thread.   You can scrunch up the fabric in your hand and the applique will NOT move.  You cut away the excess applique fabric, leaving small seam allowance and then remove about 2"-3" of the basting thread where the fabric has been cut away.  You fold the applique fabric over on the finished line (where the basting thread had just been removed) and needleturn it under.  Use your favorite stitch to secure the applique fabric to the base fabric.

While I learned this technique from her pattern, I subsequently discovered that she was going to be the guest speaker/workshop instructor at a not-so-local quilting guild.  I wrote to the guild and asked if I could attend the workshop.  Fortunately there was room and I was in.  So, I had personal instruction from Nancy Lee Chong herself!  I will admit before anyone that I was absolutely a fan girl.  Yup, I sure was.  :-)

For me, *this* the only needleturn applique technique that I like.  Oh wait .. there are a VERY few instances where I will use a water-soluable fusible interfacing as a template for very small pieces .. but 99% of the time, I'm using Nancy Lee Chong's method and laud her every chance I get.  Like now. :-)

And that's the technique I use.  :-)

Thanks so much for the explanation.  I'd never heard of that technique.

I did regular needle turn appliqué years ago, when I had more patience, I suppose!

I do raw edge appliqué with machine blanket stitch on children's quilts, usually because I don't want to spend the time on regular needle turn.

I'll definitely look up Nancy Lee Chong.  You were so lucky to get personal instruction from her!

Hawaiian appliqué is definitely on my to-do list.  Yours are just great!  Congratulations!

P.S.  How long does it take you to complete one block ?

bornblesse2

From: bornblesse2

Feb-26

I like that Hawaiian. Block pattern!  Does it have a name?

Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

From: Pirate (PIRATE_SR)

Feb-26

Patricia Drew (PatriciaDrew) said:

P.S.  How long does it take you to complete one block ?

It varies.  Definitely depends on how complex the design is .. how many tight curves and how many "extensions" from the center there are.  Skinny points aren't a problem because Nancy Lee Chong addresses this technical aspect.

The block I just finished (the first lavender batik block) went very fast ... it had very easy curves to navigate.

latterberry

From: latterberry

Feb-27

Such a beautiful block.  How long does it take you to complete one?

bornblesse2

From: bornblesse2

Feb-27

Well now, a fiddlehead fern....interesting name!

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