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What Are You Working On Now?   General Discussion

Started 11/19/17 by MarciainMD; 310168 views.
Mishii

From: Mishii

Nov-29

 I have a box of vintage embroidered blocks of the 48 state flowers.  These were done by a great aunt and she was amazingly talented with her needlework.  The only downside in making this into a quilt is you will no longer be able to see the back of the blocks and be amazed at how perfect they are.

We think these were done in the 1940s.  She died in the 1950s I think and Alaska/Hawaii weren't added until 1959.

The base fabric is very thin and since it is a bit old, I thought it would be beneficial to put some sort of stabilizer or something on the back.  What would you suggest?

I have also been dithering about the alternate blocks.  I think I have decided on solid black.  The state names are embroidered in black and the background fabric is a very pale blue.  If I was on my phone, I would add some pictures.  Perhaps I shall do that when I go upstairs.

Anyhoo, back to my stabilizer question.  Suggestions?

I would probably opt for the lightest (featherweight) non-woven fusible.  You can always take photographs of the back sides for posterity.  :o)  

I have a quilt that my Grandma made, now very threadbare from my using it on my bed for many years.  It's a mess of clumped-up cotton batting and frayed binding and stuff like that.  IIRC, it's a Seven Sisters pattern.  I want to repair and restore it.  I don't really want to use fusible on the whole thing, but I will probably need to use it in a few places.  My original idea would be to use a new fabric under the quilt top to support it (once I have un-quilted it), so that I can do any needed patching or other repairs on the fragile top itself.  Not trying to make it to be used again -- just to preserve it so it can be passed down to her great grandson (my son) and great-great grandson (my GS) - and I will explain everything on the new label.  (Grandma never did label any of her quilts, dang it!)  

Anyway, if you are loathe to apply anything fusible to the thin fabric, you could lightly stitch the blocks down to another more stable fabric before piecing the quilt.  But I reckon it depends on whether you intend to actually use it as a quilt or just display it to admire it.  If you want to use it as a bed quilt, I would probably go ahead and use the fusible.  I just always wonder how those fusibles will affect vintage linens after many years.  I have no clue about that. 

How's that for a non-committal recommendation?  ha!   

judyinohio

From: judyinohio

Nov-29

Seventy or eighty year old fabrics might be very fragile, depending on how they were stored. Hot attic?  Damp basement? We are talking about embroidered pieces that were stored before the days of "climate controlled" homes.

How large are the blocks?

You are correct about both Alaska's and Hawaii's statehood dates in 1959. Quite a to-do about changing the flag for two states in one year.

I would not plan to make your family heirloom blocks into something that will face daily use but instead make them up into something that will be for display only. Treat them like the Victorian crazy quilts that were draped over a grand piano and intended to show off a lady of leisure's fancy needlework.

Midkid5

From: Midkid5

Nov-29

I would not use fusible stabilizer, just cause we don't know the long term affects.  Please what ever fabric you use for additional blocks or sashing make sure the dye is colorfast.

Since the back shows the workmanship of your aunt, I think Judys idea of the true crazy quilt would be the way to go, but with a label.

Jo

LABFIEND

From: LABFIEND

Nov-30

Mishii said:

Anyhoo, back to my stabilizer question.  Suggestions?

I'm with Jonna, I would probably use very lightweight non woven fusible, I use that on my t shirt quilts.

MarciainMD

From: MarciainMD

Nov-30

Those are lovely blocks Dee.  I really like the strings cornering the applique blocks.  It makes them pop out.

MarciainMD

From: MarciainMD

Nov-30

That's a great Project Linus quilt and those Christmas blocks will be great when you figure out what to do with them.  I like seeing your quilting area and the quilt you're working on. 

MarciainMD

From: MarciainMD

Nov-30

Ooo, love the hour glass border!

MarciainMD

From: MarciainMD

Nov-30

How nice that you have so much room for all your sewing and quilting supplies!!  I need to get myself organized soon.  I know I can make more room, but it's harder to actually get it done.  I always find a project that I need to work on first.  Does that mean I'm a procrastinator?

MarciainMD

From: MarciainMD

Nov-30

This quilt gets more fantastic with each round.  Love it!

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