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Book Club!   Off-Topic Chat

Started Mar-2 by Mel Harris (MelHarris1); 3816 views.

Ok, someone suggested we start a new thread and put all the posts here. Since that wasn't do-able, I assembled them to hopefully help the cause :) See below:

JDO:

 Probably Archy & Mehitabel  and other books by Don Marquis.  I LOVE Archy & Mehitabel!  Also, any books by Richard Armour - humorous books about words and language.  

I read Gone With the Wind at about age 14, I think, just to say that I had read it.

One of my favorite books when I first started to read chapter books was "Baby Island" by Carol Ryrie Brink (who also wrote the Caddie Woodlawn books).  I also liked the Homer Price books by Robert McCloskey, and other "youth" books like The Witch of Blackbird Pond by Elizabeth George Speare.  I also read "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" before I knew it was part of the Narnia series.  Before I was 20, I had also read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, and it made a great impression on me.  

I was also in advanced English classes in junior high and high school, so we read several classics, including A Tale of Two Cities and Great Expectations by Dickens, and Silas Marner by George Eliot.  My love of Charles Dickens began then.  My love of Shakespeare began a little later.  

Misha:


I loved the Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe series and read all of those books repeatedly. The Voyage of the Dawn Treader was my favorite, I think.

 

MarshainMD:

I liked The Boxcar Children and the Nancy Drew series.

 

Pirate:

 

 

Favorite books:
The Black Stallion series by Walter Farley

The Dragons of Pern series by Anne McCaffrey

 

Suze:

(Stranger in a Strange Land!) Series I loved; Nancy Drew, the Boxcar Children, Tom Swift, Hardy Boys, Bobsey Twins....we had a subscription to the Reader's Digest Condensed books and I would devour those every month!! I got majorly hooked on science fiction in middle school and loved anything that Heinlein wrote (hence the Stranger in a Strange Land!! She confiscated that until I was in high school!

 

Mishii

he first series I read was The Bobbsey Twins....my mother had tons of them and it was before I started school so I didn't have the library available.  I adored them.  Then Nancy Drew and The Hardy Boys.  Ramona was always a favorite.  Oh and Pippi Longstocking!  The Black Stallion was very  much a favorite.

Once I hit junior high I had moved to random mysteries and things of that nature so nothing really sticks out.  I do remember reading Valley of the Dolls at an incredibly inappropriate age.  I think I was about 12.  We were on a family trip and it was my car book.  About halfway through the book my brother told my mom.  She had no idea what the book was about, but once she looked at it, she was certainly not happy.  I was mad because my stupid brother took my car book away.  I finally read it as an adult and laughed and laughed ..... never was there an more inappropriate book for a child to read.

Bornblessed:

as a kid I read Nancy Drew and my mom found d a series of Cherry Ames... a nursing series.  I gobbled those up.  We also read the World encyclopedias all the time!  
in HS I remember reading The Scarlet Letter and hating it...lol!  Who knows why.  But I did like Edgar Alan Poe’s the Raven. That we memorized a part of.  And Romeo and Juliet was my first Shakespeare.

 

Cathy:

The Nancy Drew Mysteries were my favorite.

 

Mel:

My fav childhood book was a series: Trixie Belden! Love them!

 

JudyinOH:

I adored my series books of  the Bobbsey Twins, all of the Nancy Drews mysteries, plus I had all of the Marguerite Henry books .. I couldn't guess how many times I reread *Justin Morgan Had a Horse* or *Misty of Chincoteague* (wish we could underline)  because we were living in Lexington, Kentucky at the time and my parents used to go to the famous horse farms (Calumet, etc.) on Sunday afternoon drives.  (Remember when families used to go on those?)  I was a cute little moppet back then and one time I was allowed to pet a famous horse (Citation). I floated home in the back seat of my parents' car.

 

SueinIL:

The Catcher in the Rye.

 

DeeinTX:

 I shake my head at what my younger self thought of Charles Dickens. I did not appreciate any of his humor or pathos, now I love his quirky characters and have cried everytime lady Deadlock dies.

 

Midkid5:

I love to read but get so involved that I can get in trouble. One hot summer Sunday, DH came home from a round of golf, wanted to know if I was sick cause the AC had not been overrode the house temperature was 80 and I was wrapped up in a blanket. I was reading a Gown of Spanish Lace by Janette Oake, blizzard and major snow storms are part of the story, I was just trying to survive theses storms.

 

Tuckyquilter:

Little Women.. still love that book to this day.  Have read it, and Gone With The Wind several times.  I love reading in general and still read a bit of some book almost every night right before I turn out the lights.  

I also have a book of darker type mysteries written by Louisa May Alcott before she was famous.  I keep it in my car, along with another book of mysteries, for when I get stuck and need something to do.  

Loved Nancy Drew. 

 

Mel:

Who are your fav narrators? I love Davina Porter, Lorelei King, Jim Dale, Susan Ericksen...

 

DeeinTX:

Jim Dale is amazing.  I commented to my daughter what a good job he did on Harry Potter.  She looked confused and said, that wasn't just one person, was it?  She absolutely was convinced it was multiple people.  He really did an amazing job keeping track of how each character sounded, all the way through that massive series.  Certainly deserved all the awards he won.

Barbara Caruso did a similar job with the Anne of Green Gables books.

Frederick Davidson is amazing for Charles Dickens and others.  An interesting fact, he also narrated under the name David Case.  Drove me crazy for a while until I looked him up, yes same guy.  

PatriciaDrew:

Just finished watching Bleak House by Charles Dickens on Britbox.  Would be amazi
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In reply toRe: msg 1

All formatting that is weird on that was not me! :D I just cut/pasted

judyinohio

From: judyinohio

Mar-2

I'm currently on a binge of reading true autobiographies written by veterinarians or other animal lovers.  Of course I had to go back and re-read *All Creatures Great and Small* by James Herriot which I first read decades ago. Granted it was a somewhat fictionalized version of the life of a man who changed his name and the names of his clients but it made for a fascinating series of books about life as a vet in the Yorkshire Dales.

The book I am currently reading on my Kindle app is Adventures of the Horse Doctor's Husband by Justin B. Long and I suspect I am going to read the sequel as well for the man captures their fascinating life in Florida very well.

I am kinda burned out on fiction and am enjoying reading about pets large and small these days.  My DS bought me a biography of Birute Galdikas,  (*Undaunted*) a woman who has dedicated decades of her life to saving habitats for orangutans in Borneo and Sumatra because he knows that orangutans are my favorite zoo animals.

I, too, get burned out if all I read are fiction. I love biographies, history type books, civil rights type education books, as well as regular chic lit, etc. If you looked at my Goodreads, it looks like I"m a spaz, but it keeps my interest up. :D 

"All creatures great and small..." makes me think of a poem we had as a child...

All things bright and beautiful,
All creatures great and small,
All things wise and wonderful,
God our Father made them all.

There was a book with this poem. ;) Thanks for the memory!

In reply toRe: msg 4
Midkid5

From: Midkid5

Mar-2

One of the suggestion for starting this thread was to be able to find good reads recommended by others. It would be nice if we put the title in bold so they pop out when going back to look for a recommended book.

Jo

tuckyquilter

From: tuckyquilter

Mar-2

THANK YOU - THANK YOU.

Currently reading "THE NIGHTINGALE" by Kristin Hannah.

I love crime/murder stuff in the Agatha Christie style, autobiographies, biographies and books on art.  Thomas Hoving has written some neat books about his time as Exe Dir of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC, and a few others that are interesting as well. 

Msg 3542.7 deleted

if you are interested in a fiction book involving vetrenarians and circus life with some adventure, murder and historic fiction thrown in, I really enjoyed Water for Elephants.  It is an elderly man remembering his time as a vet with a small circus during the depression.  INteresting on very many levels.  Warning there is a small amount of graphic ####, but you can skip over it easily (unlike some other books on every other page).   this is another one where the narration is excellent, two different men narrate each of the current day (elderly) vs flashback (fresh out of vet school).    Hmmm, may be time to listen to that one again.

edited, interesting the forum marked out ###.  But you know what I meant.  blush

I really enjoyed The Nightingale.  

other recent historical fiction I've enjoyed

The Baker's Secret (WW2, resistance France)

The book thief (WW2, inside Germany - the narrator is Death, the heroine an abandoned child rescued by a sympathetic painter)

Before we were yours (depression era, stolen children)

Where the Crawdads sing  (depression era)

MarciainMD

From: MarciainMD

Mar-2

Mel, thank you for starting this thread!

Dee, I also loved Water for Elephants.  Two other books I like a lot are Me Before You and After You by Jo Jo Moyes.  After living in Britain for so long, I love reading British books.  I also like books by Ruth Rendell.  I want to read Far From the Madding Crowd soon.  DH loved it and we watched the film.  He said the film is true to the book.  It's such a great story.

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