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anyone ever used Jodi Burrows Square in a square method?   General Discussion

Started Nov-11 by Dee in TX (DBRADFOR3); 535 views.

I have been making a number of these and was curious if there was a ruler out there.  Her method makes every outer edge bias, seems like that would be a problem.  I was curious if anyone had tried it.

I don't think you need a special ruler or special method or incremental measurements to do a square in a square block.  I would definitely avoid having bias edges on the outside of the block.  I have had great success just using two squares that are the same size as your center square, cutting them in half diagonally to make the four corners.  That way you have straight of grain on all sides.  It does result in more of a "floating" square in a square, which I really like.  But that's just me.  You can also trim the blocks so that you have the "usual" 1/4 inch seam allowance and your points will be precisely placed and just "kissing" the seam line.  The kind of quilts I like to make do not require that much precision.  I like the "floating" squares, but I also know I can do the other kind if I want to.  The amount trimmed is not that significant - maybe 1/4 more all around - so there's not a lot of waste.  

I made an acrylic ruler several years ago that is marked for 4" centers, but as you would expect of a ruler made from Home Depot acrylic and a sharpie, it's a little rough - literally.  But it works ok I just have to be careful when I cut as the rotary cutter will slice off slivers if I twist at al.

Suze (casuzenn)

From: Suze (casuzenn)

Nov-11

yes...my very first quilt was using Jodi Barrow's Square in a Square ruler...

I had gone to a craft show with a couple of my friends..I was not a quilter yet...we went to a demo of this ruler because my quilter friend noticed the class was about getting perfect points...and the lady demo-ing it was so fun. She did the demo and then asked "why would someone cut up perfectly good fabric into tiny squares?" The answer she said was "why, to make it more beautiful"...that made perfect sense to me...so when she asked if anyone in the audience thought they could use this ruler - you set it down on the block by lining it up on the seams and whack off what sticks out, I kinda said under my breath "I think I could do that"...my friends all turned towards me, like I had grown a new head or something and were totally amazed....One friend had a sewing room that all of us could meet in. I went to WalMart, G helped me pick out three fabrics, I took my hither-too unused sewing machine down to her big sewing room and they taught me how to use the rotary cutter and how to use my machine and how to chain piece...I got a good bit done at that first meeting...went home, co-op'ed the kitchen table,  worked like a dog and had the quilt quilted by the next weekend when a couple of us got together to go Christmas Shopping...I was the first one of the group done!! And that is how I became a quilter!

It's a neat ruler...those points are pointy!

judyinohio

From: judyinohio

Nov-11

You really caught a serious case of the Quilt Pox!

My first quilt was nowhere near that good :) Nice job!

tuckyquilter

From: tuckyquilter

Nov-12

I have used Jodi's Method for years, along with others of course.  I have a mini and a large, but not the Grande ruler. as the other two are plenty.  Since I'm a scrap quilter to begin with, the minor waste of fabric due to the cutting method isn't a problem.  I haven't found the other edge to be a problem.

Her method is really fun for making the twisted blocks.  I was given the center string blocks in the quilt below and set them aside to think about how to use them for the best outcome.  I chose Jodi's Option 16 that uses the 60 degree angle on the ruler.  It gives them the twist.  AND you can twist clockwise or counter clockwise>  

Her method is great for making Flying Geese too. No triangles etc.

I'd recommend you borrow someone's ruler and give it a try before you spend the money.

thanks for sharing your pic, that turned out great.  and a good suggestion too.

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