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Solar Energy   Sky

Started 12/17/16 by Cstar1; 9700 views.
In reply toRe: msg 23
Cstar1
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From: Cstar1

11/19/17

Gary (GARY479)

From: Gary (GARY479)

11/22/17

Oslo has taken the lead in green tech with free charging stations for electric cars and mandated non-ice engines in the coming years. The carbon-sucking fools can be thwarted through incentivism. Here it is opposite, all incentives are oil-driven. One tax incentive even gives a free gas-guzzling truck or suv to businesses through a tax credit.

BlueMoon67

From: BlueMoon67

11/22/17

I live in Southern California and today it was 96 degrees and I had to turn the air conditioning on again. I like to joke that we have two seasons: hot and less hot! "Less hot" only lasts for about 4 months (and will include intermittent heat waves), so the AC runs about April through November. 

What I would like to see is solar panels on every outdoor parking lot. Not only could we generate electricity, but we could keep our cars from turning into ovens while they bake in the sun all day. At the university I'm currently attending, their newest parking structure actually does have solar panels on the top level, which is a good start. As far as I know, electric charging stations are not free. (My Prius is an older model and does not use a charging station, so it wouldn't benefit me at present.) I have seen charging stations on occasion, but you have to pay for them still. I think if every parking lot or structure simply put solar panels in, they could easily offer free charging to people parking there. And for those who don't need it, they would get shade for their car which everyone appreciates. 

RGoss99

From: RGoss99

11/23/17

Such tax credits are simply movivated to give profits to what I consider negative industries.

Tax credits should be incentives to make things better.

When I installed solar panels, the incentives were two: low interest fixed income loan, and the ability to pay me for my surplus to add to the power grid.

Since my interest was fixed, as the cost of electricity goes up, my loan is being wiped out more quickly, maintenance for the system is very low. As a result,

now after 18 years, after deducting for my interest and lown principal, my cut has doubled since the system was installed, and my debt is inflation proof.

RGoss99

From: RGoss99

11/23/17

Panels as shade. Unlike California, our open parking lots have always had shades, as do parts of our school playgrounds. Since I have been heere, many of these, especially in the city have been replaced by solar panels. In my village, our gym, primary, and secondary school are grid independent* Our pool has a retractable roof for year round swimming, but the attached locker room, gym, and football stadium, do not produce enough panel space to make the pool 100% independent.

As for houses, or sunless days are so rare, that batteries are usually sifficient. However some have added, or replaced old windmills, because we always have wind, which increases, on days when there is no sun. If you are familiar with "Don Quijote" you know about Spain and windmills. In our village they were still being used to pump water, and drive various mechanical devices such as lathes, olive and wine presses. The problem with the traditional mill is sthe energy los between the horzontal power of the wind, and the mechanics to turn the power to vertical, then if needed back to horizontal. With many of the old, and often disused mills, the government allows a non historical mode for capturing wind power, which is vertical. It consists of a pair of twisted airfoils, which pick up the wind from any direction and directly drive a vertical drive shaft. I first ran across this at university in Scotland. St Andrews in Fife faces the North Sea on the edge of a basicly flat peninsula So bound by the Tay to the north and the Forth to the south, there is nothing to block a permanent air flow from any direction. 

RGoss99

From: RGoss99

11/23/17

Having lived in Southern California, there is the added problem with architecture. The original California bungalo, had a simple peaked roof with luvers at each end of the attic. and was built above the ground such that there was a natural airflow both above and below the living space. In addition, the kitchens had a sort of closet shel unit, where its ceiling and floor, along with the shelves were framed wire mesh, good for keeping vegetables fresh. In addition to the adobe style from the colonial period with thick walls, and tile roofs that could breathe. Down side for adobe is earth quakes, but not for the bungalo, which could be a problem for house fires.

We don´t have earthquakes, so thick stone walls are common, and having stone ceilings means that house fires are usually confined to one room, cool in summer, warm in winter. Another architectural advantage as in my house is a cupola, effectively a 3 story tower in the center of my house with 12 windows at the top. So in the summer the windows catch the wind, and the inteerior wndows inside the house draw the heat out of the rooms on the two floors below which escapes through the open windows of the cupola. In winter, the cupola windows are closed, and horizontal windows fill the space below which was opened before, thus the desired heat on the floors below does not escape. These horizontal windows separating the ground and first floor are double glazed with an electric wire mesh between the glass, which radiates heat for the second floor. Note, that a similar mesh is just below the floor tiles in the rooms. below and around the tower. My drawing room has a fire place, used for both heat and burning rubbish, but has 3 cells. The fireplace itself, iron box within a stone struicture with heat vents that can be opened or closed like the Franklin stove, then the sone chimney, as a metal chimney inside of it, which heats the space between it and the stone walls, thuse adding heat through vents in the drawing room above the fireplace level, and the bedroom above.. Kitchen is electric, but also has an open space for a fire pit in the sink, with a hood to take away the smoke, drawn by a wind driven fan outside at the top of the chimney.- 

This year, I installed an arched trellis over my roof garden, thus providing shade in summer, but without leaves on the bouganvilla, and grape vines the sun shows through in the winter. At the laateral edges, I have fruit trees (orange and lemon) that keep their leaves all around, which provides a wind break.

Cstar1
Host

From: Cstar1

11/23/17

I've always wondered how long it takes to charge an electric car?

BlueMoon67

From: BlueMoon67

11/23/17

Good question, but I'm not sure. My Prius is an older model so does not plug in. I'm guessing an hour might do it? Maybe depends on the model. 

Gary (GARY479)

From: Gary (GARY479)

11/24/17

Some can charge in 15 minutes to a half hour, some overnight,  of course, hybrids charge constantly.

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