General -  Choosing Locomotive Lighting (89 views) Notify me whenever anyone posts in this discussion.Subscribe
 
From: Chocolate Pig (TOILETHEA1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostNov-24 6:33 AM 
To: All  (1 of 13) 
 132.1 

Choosing Locomotive Lighting For the Long Run

New locomotives are built with LED lighting, both on the exterior and interior, providing a brighter longer lasting, albeit a more expensive alternative. For existing locomotive fleets, most likely it’s time to upgrade from incandescent lighting to a brighter future with a durable alternative. Both LED and halogen are offering alternatives with safety and maintenance benefits for Class I, passenger and light rail locomotives.

The biggest mistake made in transportation maintenance and repair today is making purchasing decisions based on the lowest price. Price should never be the only consideration even with something as simple as a lamp. For example, a $15 bulb may seem like a small part of a locomotive’s overall expense, but it can have a big impact when it goes out.

In addition to replacing the lamp itself, there is the labor involved in changing the lamp as well as the lost revenue while being serviced. For locomotive head lamps and ditch lamps, incandescent will always offer the lowest price, because they are the oldest technology and are not the most reliable or the most cost effective in the long run. These incandescent bulbs are less durable and continued vibration can cause the filament to break leaving the locomotive with only one light.

For head lamps, incandescent lamps also lose their aim from the constant movement on the track causing the beam to start to tilt up over time. Additionally, these lamps lack the brightness of the halogen and LED alternatives.  

When we examine LED lighting options, cost tends to be the biggest concern. Current locomotives in production do come with standard LED lighting. This alternative does allow for brighter, longer lasting light. However, as these LED lights start to get older gradation is a factor. This is evident if you look, for example, at the simple LED strings of lights lining airplanes aisles. When the plane is new, the walkway lights are perfect. Within a few years, areas start to burn out and the lights start dimming. The only way to repair a light is to replace the whole line if LED lights on both sides of the aisle match.

More at

https://www.railwayage.com/mechanical/choosing-locomotive-lighting-for-the-long-run/

 

 
From: WALTER784 DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostNov-25 12:44 AM 
To: Chocolate Pig (TOILETHEA1) DelphiPlus Member Icon  (2 of 13) 
 132.2 in reply to 132.1 

LED lights last 10 times longer but only cost 3 or 4 times more.

Our local neighborhood residence association decided to switch out all of our street lamps to LED lights. Reason was due to the electric bill cost of the older lighting. The new LED lights were installed 4 years ago, but after the first 1.5 years... the drop in electric costs actually paid for the LEDs and the new mounts required for the new LED lights.

For trains, it would reduce the amount of electricity the train would have to generate drastically as well.

FWIW

 

 
From: Chocolate Pig (TOILETHEA1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostNov-25 3:52 AM 
To: WALTER784 DelphiPlus Member Icon  (3 of 13) 
 132.3 in reply to 132.2 

Good for them! I think the inital cost surely paid for itself!

 

 
From: WALTER784 DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostNov-25 4:19 AM 
To: Chocolate Pig (TOILETHEA1) DelphiPlus Member Icon  (4 of 13) 
 132.4 in reply to 132.3 

Yeah... it initially seems expensive due to the price, but when you calculate it over the long run... it's actually cheaper.

$15 once every 2 years for 10 years... that's $75. So is that $60 LED really that expensive? And even if the LED is priced at $85... over 10 years, the electricity bill over 10 years would have made it feasible to buy a $150 LED light.

FWIW

 

 
From: Chocolate Pig (TOILETHEA1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostNov-25 6:22 AM 
To: WALTER784 DelphiPlus Member Icon  (5 of 13) 
 132.5 in reply to 132.4 

I had never thought of any of this until I saw that article.

 

 
From: BlueMoon67 DelphiPlus Member IconNov-25 12:49 PM 
To: Chocolate Pig (TOILETHEA1) DelphiPlus Member Icon  (6 of 13) 
 132.6 in reply to 132.1 

I've started replacing light bulbs at home with the LEDs. It will be a while still before I see what impact they have on the electric bill. 

 

 
From: Chocolate Pig (TOILETHEA1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostNov-25 12:52 PM 
To: BlueMoon67 DelphiPlus Member Icon  (7 of 13) 
 132.7 in reply to 132.6 

I'm sure it will be quite a savings!

 

 
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From: WALTER784 DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostNov-27 5:23 AM 
To: BlueMoon67 DelphiPlus Member Icon  (8 of 13) 
 132.8 in reply to 132.6 

The more you replace, the bigger and faster you will notice it.

If you replace all of them at once, you'll see the effect in next month's bill.

If you replace half of them, you'll see half the effect in next month's bill.

If you replace less than half... the effects will be smaller.

Edited to add: [As LEDs are brighter, you might want to look for the yellowish LED bulbs over the whitish or bluish ones to offset the brightness a bit.]

FWIW

  • Edited November 27, 2021 5:25 am  by  WALTER784
 

 
From: BlueMoon67 DelphiPlus Member IconNov-27 1:17 PM 
To: WALTER784 DelphiPlus Member Icon  (9 of 13) 
 132.9 in reply to 132.8 

When I buy the bulbs, I'm really looking for the color, i.e. the Kelvin rating. The first bulbs I bought for my office, were too blue (5000K), and then I bought 4000K bulbs and that was just right. (I don't want it yellowish at all in my office.) I used one of the 5000K bulbs in a hall light, because the hall is so dark, and there's only one light in the center. That works really well. I then replaced four bulbs in a fixture in the center of the TV room/sewing room, also 4000K, but I'm a bit on the fence about that because it does seem a bit bluish. That one also has a dimmer switch, so it doesn't have to be full brightness. I think the next one will be a lightbulb in the kitchen, over the sink, because that one is too yellow and not bright enough. I may just stick a 4000K bulb in there because I still have two left over. I can always keeps switching around. I also have a leftover 5000K bulb that I think will go in the garage next. 

 

 
From: WALTER784 DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostNov-27 7:39 PM 
To: BlueMoon67 DelphiPlus Member Icon  (10 of 13) 
 132.10 in reply to 132.9 

Have you thought about installing dimmer switches?

FWIW

 

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