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Who pays of you get quarantined?   General Travel Discussion

Started Mar-6 by Gimmie Chocolate Shorty (TOILETHEA1); 260 views.

Who Pays if There's a Coronavirus Outbreak and You Get Quarantined on Vacation?

The COVID-19 coronavirus outbreak has understandably made people nervous about travel. In response, public-health officials and experts have issued lots of advice for travelers, including the directive to only visit places you wouldn’t mind ending up quarantined.

That advice, often given half-jokingly, is something travelers should actually consider. About 1,000 people were quarantined at a hotel in Spain’s Canary Islands after guests who stayed there tested positive for COVID-19, and travelers in countries including China, Italy, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the Philippines have also reportedly been quarantined in their hotels. Passengers have also gotten stuck on several cruise ships due to COVID-19 concerns. Even actor Tom Cruise got sequestered in an Italian hotel due to an outbreak there.

For non-celebrities, these incidents prompt an obvious question: Who pays if you get quarantined on vacation?

“Each circumstance is unique,” a U.S. State Department representative tells TIME. “In the case of several cruise ships in East Asia that underwent quarantine, the cruise lines themselves assumed the cost of accommodations. In most other cases, individual travelers are responsible for managing their self-quarantine.”

https://www.msn.com/en-us/travel/news/who-pays-if-theres-a-coronavirus-outbreak-and-you-get-quarantined-on-vacation/ar-BB10NBoD

 

RGoss99

From: RGoss99

Mar-7

Easy answer, your travel insurance company if you are Smart enough to consider the risk and purchase insurance accordingly. Independent of this virus, any time you put yourself in a closed environment away from home, you are choosing to be at risk, so take responsibility for your actions. Tomorrow I Will be taking an off season train to another town, and returning on Monday in a probable near empty train. Odds of close contact with foreigners is low, Will not purchase insurance. However If I was taking a flight of the same length, I would purchase insurance because the two plane rides, and passing through an international airport 4 times, would make me think differently.

I would think most travelers would have insurance of some sort.  But it wouldn't surprise me a bit if a lot didn't .... IMO that is foolish especially if going international.

RGoss99

From: RGoss99

Mar-8

I agree it is foolish but I would not be surprised if a lot didn´t covering this type of thing. Remember how the U.K. government had to bail out so many tourists when Cooke collapsed, and even this was not enough. I live on Mallorca and belong to the English Speaking Union, and we contacted the U.K. consulate to volunteer, and in the short term they took us up. Here is a typical case - family on a two week package tour, when it is over they check out of their hotel arrive at the airport and discover no plane, and no plans for a transfer. Can´t go back because their room is already taken - so all of a sudden they are homeless in high season and no vacancies, or at least in their price range. So many English locals took them in while their government figured out how to solve the problem which in some cases it took days because we are an island and flying was the only option.

It's a crazy thing; people are panicky and I can understand; but reading about this virus and what to do and not do helps. It's good that people were able to  help them, I like hearing stories of people  helping others.   

BlueMoon67

From: BlueMoon67

Mar-9

Are you sure the insurance would cover lost wages? 

RGoss99

From: RGoss99

Mar-10

Good point, but not relevant in my case as I am retired and live on a pension. so no point even though this trip was on salary. But in theory, as in answer to your question, the answer normally would be no. But on the other hand, Lloyds will insure anything, so in theory, if I was a famous actor, or something, I could purchase insurance for lost income. 

Here is a silly but valid example. First of all Brits and Americans are sort of law suit happy, and both justice systems sort of encourage this with sympathetic juries and frivilous suits. A British model of some status, was contracted to come to Mallorca for a photo shoot. We are not against health and safety laws per se, but our courts take contributary neglegence seriously (as opposed to Rodney King´s suit he won for police brutality. Yes, the police beat him, but for political reasons, they never tried him in court for the laws he was breaking prior to the beating, which were partially responsible for the result. We have a lot of cultural events that involve fire. Safety precautions are published in the press, and programs, and in the aria of the event. [hear I am paraphrasing the notice in sveeral languages including English] saying, there is a possibility of danger from fire so we recommend spectators stay well clear of the event, wear shoes, fire resistant clothing, lenses to protect eyes, and have their head covered. This model´s concept of head covering was a nylon scarf. Within the posted area she was standing under a petard when it went off (note I go to these events wearing industrial gogles, and a U.S. Nam period "boonie" had which could have allowed me to get a direct blast without damage. In this case her nylon scarf and hair caught fire, causing sever hair loss as the scarf melted into it (no other damage).Of course she could not work the next day, she had regular insurance that did not cover loss of wages, her medical needs were minimum and were covered, so she went to court. In the process of throwing her case out, the judge asked her "what is their about danger of fire, did you not understand".  Case chucked for negligence on he part because had she followed the advice of the city which sponsored the event, there would have been no damage. Still she could have purchased a policy from Lloyds that would have covered her.

Good morning to you and thank you   :)

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