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Changing clutch friction plates... 2007 V-Star 1100 Classic.   Technical-Bikes

Started Sep-25 by JMK1100 (JMK1000); 559 views.
JMK1100 (JMK1000)

From: JMK1100 (JMK1000)

Sep-25

Hi Riders,

I got my bike (2007 V-Star 1100 Classic) 3 months ago.  It had 7800 miles.  I added 700 miles in a NYC dense traffic.  
My clutch is catching at the last 1/2" of the lever. Also the clutch produces a hissing sound. Especially after the 30-40miles stretch on a highway. 
So, I decided to change the friction plates (maybe the steel plates as well). I got an OEM plates kit (and the bearing - which is not a part of the kit, but why not replacing it as well).

Since I have a very limited access to a space where I can work on the bike, I need to do it in one sitting, not more than 3-4 hours. I have never done this particular job. I have seen a few videos. It looks like I can do that - but I am looking for some pointers as to what 'unexpected' can be there, when I open it up. 

Also, Do you Guys replace the bolts and a washer which attach the exhaust pipe to the front cylinder? The bolts on my bike (only these bolts attaching the exhaust) are rusty - do you treat them before removing with anything - and if so - what?

I am making the carton mock-up of the engine cover, so my bolts will be in proper places, and not mixed up. 

The last steel plate is secured with a wire.  Do you usually replace this last plate if it looks well, or leave it in?  What tool should I use to remove the wire, and put back the new one?  Can I use something else (not a special tool) for it?

How do you torque the bolts on the cover after assembling it together?  Also, I am planning to use a few 'headless' bolts as guides, to make sure that the gasket is positioned properly - what is the thread on the bolts (I won't know myself until I take any one off.

Also, what do you sue (if anything) to seal the gasket?  Anything specific or just a touch of oil?

I would appreciate if someone could answer ALL of these questions.  All of them are crucial (for me).  

Thanks a lot.

yama_hammer

From: yama_hammer

Sep-26

Have you tried doing both the upper and lower clutch lever adjustments? Make sure you are using a NON energy conserving oil or clutch friendly specific motorcycle oil. I seriously doubt your clutch is burnt out in just 7800 miles.

JMK1100 (JMK1000)

From: JMK1100 (JMK1000)

Sep-26

Thanks.  It would be strange indeed if it was burned.  But, this bike is 14 years old.  Not driven much, but who knows what oil was used.  
The last 700 miles I did in the NYC traffic, stop-and-go.  Constant friction.  And I noticed the dramatic change in the sound, as well when the clutch is catching.  The friction zone shrunk noticeably.  And the gradation from starting engaging to fully engaged is more step.  All together, it feels like the friction plates lost their elasticity.  And at the same time the first gear gets in with o noticeable jolt.  And then a sound, which I can explain only as 'hissing' - from the crankcase.  So, I am getting worried.  It maybe also an overheated (NYC heavy traffic) spring, which lost the depth.  

I use fully synthetic YamaLube Hi-Performance Full Synthetic Engine Oil 10W40 - I changed it a month ago.  I got no idea what was the previous oil, but it got dirty quite fast.
Am I reading the symptoms in a right way?  Or is says something completely different to the experienced riders?

Sick Mick* (quick_mick)
Host

Like mentioned above.....proper adjustment is the first step. The lower adjustment is critical and often overlooked.

JMK1100 (JMK1000)

From: JMK1100 (JMK1000)

Sep-26

My next question is probably stupid, but I need to ask it anyway:
What in particular does the lower adjustment do different than the upper adjustment.  As I understood it so far - it helps to reduce the slack and establish the proper 'free' action of the lever, right?  Or it does anything else?  Could you explain?
At this point I have a little free action of the lever, before it starts pulling the clutch.  

Sick Mick* (quick_mick)
Host

The upper adjusts the lever...the lower adjusts the actual clutch.

JMK1100 (JMK1000)

From: JMK1100 (JMK1000)

Sep-27

Thanks.  Do you know, off hand, where to find the instruction on how to make the lower adjustment?  I will google for it anyway.

I need to know more on the subject.

gradie55

From: gradie55

Sep-27

just to give you an idea .. my 03 1100 has the stock friction and steel plates and 70,000 on the dial, it has been adjusted yearly at a minimum... I'm also heavily modified double the stock hp... so slippage is possible.. but I've compensated that with 79 lb clutch springs...  

JMK1100 (JMK1000)

From: JMK1100 (JMK1000)

Sep-27

Thanks.  Once I dug a bit in the subject, I understood at last what one can adjust doing low end adjustment.  Now it makes the perfect sense, that this is the FIRST option to be used.

Since the wear changes the thickness of the friction plates, doing the low end adjustment one compensates for it.  Simple.

So, procedural question:

Should I do the adjustment on a 'dead cold' engine (it's not that cold now in NYC, but when NOT-warmed-up) or 'cooled down' after running.  I live in the city and it's not a comfortable thing to work at a curb - so I need to go to a friend's warehouse - a few miles of city traffic away.  What's better?

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