Shrinking Shorty (TOILETHEA1)

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Numerous Shinkansen trains @ 199MPH   International Train News

Started Jun-9 by WALTER784; 100 views.
WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Jun-9

Japan's fastest Shinkansen runs in front of you at 320km/h (199mph)!

FWIW

Yikes, half a blink and it's gone  LOL

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Jun-11

Yep, you could travel 4,500 miles in roughly 23 hours @ approx. 200MPH!

Almost like DC to San Francisco!!!

FWIW

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Jun-12

That is what high-speed rail could do for America!

FWIW

It would be great for certain areas!

Ishmael112

From: Ishmael112

Jun-12

One problem with having such a high speed train in America is that we would need to put it where no one wants to ride the train.   Even if we had elevated tracks over the tracks in the Northeast Corridor we would have to bypass New York with the train.   That is possible.   It was done back in the 19th century when the Federal Express between New York and Boston took an alternate rail route at Trenton and then followed the Delaware river and then crossed the Hudson and Connecticut rivers at narrow places to steam into Boston.   

But New York City remains an important station.   

Ish

WALTER784
Staff

From: WALTER784

Jun-13

The major problem with bringing high-speed rail to major cities like New York is the skyscrapers all around and most of the rails into downtown NYC are for the most part... underground. 

That would mean that high-speed rails would have to be over existing rail or existing highways for above ground rails, over water for areas where there is no rail or highway, or underground into the city center.

So, from several miles outside of the city center, things could be above ground, but for the most part, the city central portion would probably have to be underground for several miles. 

And as high-speed rail would either be underground or elevated rails, the chances of collision would be virtually non-existent.

Perhaps the northern corridor would be one of the most difficult to bring high-speed rail into because they already have a massive regular rail infrastructure. 

FWIW

 

Ishmael112

From: Ishmael112

Jun-13

I don't see anyone who really wants a new high speed rail line between New York and Boston.   State politicians are not going to demand a line which will only bypass their cities.   Federal politicians outside of the area have no interest in it.   

 

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