Coalition of the Confused

Hosted by Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Confused malcontents swilling Chardonnay while awaiting the Zombie Apocalypse.

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HOLD ON RUTH!!   America - all of it

Started Jul-15 by Jenifer (Zarknorph); 3024 views.
In reply toRe: msg 23
CzoeMC

From: CzoeMC

Sep-21

Tears.

When I first knew of Ruth Bader Ginsberg's death, I started sobbing.

First I cried with an inconsolable, and inappropriate anger, "Ruth, couldn't you have hung on for a few more months?"

Second were tears of grief, for the loss of such a lovely person who cared about people and the Constitution she served.

Third, I cried in sorrow, for what is going to be a political circus mess, before the election.

  • Edited September 21, 2020 6:23 pm  by  CzoeMC
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Sep-22

RBG had concerns about the vulnerability of the law.  It would be sad if those warnings came true.

In reply toRe: msg 25
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Sep-22

slackerx

From: slackerx

Sep-22

Now her family is coming under attack. Why??? 

In reply toRe: msg 27
slackerx

From: slackerx

Sep-22

This is getting ugly.

In reply toRe: msg 28
slackerx

From: slackerx

Sep-22

Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Sep-23

In reply toRe: msg 30
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Sep-23

In reply toRe: msg 31
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Sep-23

Analysis


slackerx

From: slackerx

Sep-23

https://www.pbs.org/fmc/book/2work8.htm#workchart8

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WORK

Working Women

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Married women entered the paid labor force in large numbers.
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In 1900, only 6 percent of married women worked outside the home, usually when their blue-collar husbands were unemployed. Among wives with children at home, very few worked at all. Almost half of single women held jobs, but they usually stopped working when they married or, at the latest, when they got pregnant, and most never worked for pay again. About a third of widowed and divorced women worked, typically out of economic necessity. Never-married women with children were virtually unknown.

The labor force participation rate of single women peaked in World War II and then declined as large numbers of them pursued higher education. The sharp jump in their work force participation in 1967 is a statistical artifact reflecting an increase in the defined minimum age of the labor force from fourteen to sixteen years old. In the early 1970s, the labor force participation rate of single women began a steady rise to nearly 70 percent by 1998 (see chart at upper left). 

The labor force participation rate of widowed, divorced, and separated women remained fairly stable until 1940, when it began a gradual rise to nearly 50 percent (see chart at upper right). These women were considerably older on average than those in the other three groups, and many had income sources such as survivors’ benefits or alimony payments.

The steady movement of married women into the labor force began around 1920, spiked during World War II, and never abated (see chart at lower left). In 1998, more than 60 percent of all married women living with their husbands worked for pay outside the family home. Their labor force participation was only slightly lower than that of single women and considerably higher than that of widowed, divorced, and separated women.

Data on the labor force participation of married women with children under age six go back only to 1950, but the rise since then has been sharp (see chart at lower right). Their labor force participation rate increased more than fivefold, from 12 percent in 1950 to 64 percent in 1998, helping to create an entire industry of paid day care in the process.


Chapter 2 chart 8

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