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Who are the "legals"? And how did "legals" become a plural noun?   America - all of it

Started Sep-24 by slackerx; 313 views.
slackerx

From: slackerx

Sep-24

I thought that in english, the word "legal" was an adjective. Does anybody know how adding an "s" to an adjective in English makes it a plural noun? 

The NAZIs and the KKK came here to Iowa and claimed that it does. 

But is this really how the English language works?

  • Edited September 24, 2020 3:54 pm  by  slackerx
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Sep-25

I'm going to add my displeasure at Reveal being a noun.

Reality TV shows based on home renovations keep talking about the big "REVEALS" this week!

The word is "Revelations", and it's perfectly acceptable.

slackerx

From: slackerx

Sep-26

Reality TV shows based on home renovations keep talking about the big "REVEALS" this week!

"The Great Reveal" sounds like the title of a Geraldo Rivera open the crypt special.

A 'reveal' is  when at the end of the show Inspector Cluseau reveals the identity of the real murderer.

The detective novel appears in the 1860s with Émile Gaboriau, who wrote a number of books featuring Monsieur Lecoq, a master of disguise, who had a remarkable genius for reconstructing events at a crime scene.
 
 
As Lecoq's fame spreads so he becomes more dependent on his talent for disguise.  This enables Gaboriau to set up fantastic set-pieces in which the criminals suddenly realize that Lecoq has discovered all.  Like L'Affaire Lerouges, Les Esclaves de Paris revolves around the tragic consequences of the swopping of an aristocrat's legitimate and illegitimate children.  The illegitimate son, Paul Violaine, escapes from the provincial orphanage in which he is placed and comes to Paris, hoping to work as a a piano teacher.  Ensconced in squalid rooms on the Rue del Huchette, he joins forces with Mascarot, whose employment agency is the front for a massive blackmail ring.  Mascarot has the guilty secrets of the entire city carefully recorded on little paper cards, and together he and Paul connive to destroy the true heir, André, a painter.
 
 
... Although there is still a fairy-tale element in Gaboriau's fiction, this remains in the background, with the main focus being the detective and, to an extent, Paris itself.  Gaboriau's city is a maelstrom into which the unfortunate disappear, apparently without a trace, and where the evil come to assume new identities, the better to pursue their crimes.  As Dr. Watson would later note of his own capital city, it was 'that great cesspool into which all the loungers and idlers of the Empire are irresistibly drained'.
 
 
-- Jonathan Conlin, Tales of Two Cities: Paris, London, and the Birth of the Modern City (Counterpoint, 2013)
 
 
 
 
Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes became the British, and ultimately most famous of these early fictional detectives.  Drawing heavily on the 'reveal' scenes of Lecoq, these have become standard fare ('Why have you called us all here, Poirot?').
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Sep-27

It's one of those words that never sounds right on the ear.  Or is it in?

Like, that's very suspect.

jra2750

From: jra2750

Sep-28

'Legals' became a plural noun 'cause They come in bunches.  It's entire families now where is was mostly single young men.

jra2750

From: jra2750

Sep-28

U R correct...well look at me?  Using single letters rather than spelling out YOU and ARE.

It's not as if we on the forums were writing college reports.

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