Coalition of the Confused

Hosted by Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Confused malcontents swilling Chardonnay while awaiting the Zombie Apocalypse.

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Israel 2   Africa and the Middle East

Started Feb-16 by Jenifer (Zarknorph); 10776 views.
bml00

From: bml00

Feb-16

Unfortunately there is very little sympathy for Gaza , this is merely points scoring as the West Bank leadership is frightened stiff by Hamas and if it was not for Israel the PA would no longer exist as they would have been put against a wall and shot.

Why have the Arabs not raised their voices to help the Gazans ?

BM

In reply toRe: msg 2
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Feb-16

The whole strip should just be pushed out to sea.

bml00

From: bml00

Feb-16

There are at times I agree with you , the leadership they elected has done nothing for the people more or less the same as Hezbollah has led Lebanon from disaster to disaster , the Iranian paymasters dont give a fig for the people 

BM

In reply toRe: msg 4
bml00

From: bml00

Feb-16

Israel now vaccinating Migrant Workers both legal and illegal Israel: Foreign workers, asylum seekers get free COVID vaccine jabs in Tel Aviv - YouTube

In reply toRe: msg 5
Rare Israeli Bedouin audio archive sheds light on nomadic society
 
National Library works to transcribe and digitize over 350 hours of recordings in Arabic made by leading scholar Clinton Bailey, a project aimed at enriching Bedouin studies in Israel, the Arab world and beyond
 
 
Feb 23, 2021
 
Leading Bedouin scholar Clinton Bailey has amassed hundreds of hours of recordings about the nomadic society's poetry, history and legal system, in a career that began while jogging through the Negev Desert in southern Israel.
 
Bailey's unique Arabic audio archive is now being transcribed and digitized by the National Library, a project aimed at enriching Bedouin scholarship in Israel, the Arab world and beyond.
 
 
 
A member of the Al-Turi Arab Bedouin tribe in the unrecognized village of Al-Araqeeb north of Be'er Sheva 
 
I find that in understanding Bedouin culture... you understand human nature, how people adjust to living under very difficult circumstances," Bailey said.
 
There are some 250,000 Bedouins living in Israel, part of the mainly Palestinian-Arab community that stayed following the creation of the state in 1948.
 
Impoverished and often living on the margins, Bedouin culture is understudied in Israel, a problem Bailey's recordings will help address, said Raquel Ukeles, head of collections at the library.
 
The national library has consistently prioritized material on Islam but put less prime on the culture and history of indigenous Arab communities, she said.
 
"This collection enables us to preserve and document Bedouin culture, in an area we are trying to fill in gaps and document all aspects of Israeli society," she said.
 
Going to disappear
 
Bailey was teaching political science at New York's Columbia University in the late 1960s when he decided to move to Israel to teach English on a southern kibbutz.
  
 
 
Leading Bedouin scholar Clinton Bailey
 
An Arabic speaker, he was frequently invited by Bedouins into their tents as he jogged in the surrounding area. Eventually, he bought a jeep to visit Bedouin communities further afield.
 
Now in his early 80s, he recalled thinking that Bedouin society was at a transition point.
 
Watching them use radios and plastic containers was a harbinger of encroaching modernity that would inevitably infringe on their traditional ways, he said, adding he feared Bedouin culture "was going to disappear." 
 
In order to preserve it, Bailey decided to chronicle the Bedouins orally-based culture. The first step was to acquire a tape recorder.
 
"My senses told me that recording what they remembered and how they lived was the important thing to do."
 
 
Bedouin village in the Negev in southern Israel 
 
His interviews with Bedouin citizens of Israel and in the Egyptian Sinai Peninsula, which Israel occupied for more than a decade after the 1967 Six-Day War, yielded around 350 hours of recordings.
 
The content includes Bedouin poetry, legal issues, religion, history and environment.
 
Bailey, who won a human rights award from the Association for Civil Rights in Israel in 1994 for his advocacy, has also penned books, including a tome of 113 Bedouin poems.
 
To complete its three-year digitization project, the library has hired members of the Bedouin community to help, among other things, transcribe the recordings using their knowledge of the lo
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Crossing COVID chasm between Israel and Palestinians
 
While Israeli-Palestinian Businessman Ismail Daiq, 62, has already had his second vaccine shot, his siblings and 95-year-old mother from the West Bank are still awaiting a vaccine rollout that has only gone underway in PA
 
Feb 3, 2021
 
 
As a Palestinian living in Jerusalem, Ismail Daiq is used to negotiating the dividing lines between communities: the daily commute to his Jordan Valley date farm involves crossing a checkpoint on his way home.
 
Now the coronavirus pandemic has created another faultline for him to navigate: the stark difference between access to vaccines in Israel and in the Palestinian territories.
 
 
 
Palestinian Businessman Ismail Daiq, who was vaccinated against coronavirus, buys vegetables in Jericho (Photo: Reuters)
 
Living within the Israeli health system, Daiq, 62, has already received his second COVID-19 vaccination in a country that is a leader in the world's inoculation drive.
 
But his Palestinian siblings and 95-year-old mother in Jericho are still awaiting a vaccine rollout that has only just begun under the Palestinian Authority, which exercises limited sovereignty in the West Bank.
 
Daiq is eligible for vaccination because he became a Jerusalem resident two decades ago when he married a woman from the city.
 
 
 
Palestinian Businessman Ismail Daiq 
 
The rest of his family, friends and employees do not qualify, because they only have West Bank identity papers that do not let them pass through the Israeli checkpoints that control entry to the city.
 
So when the date farmer travels each day into the Palestinian territories, he is uncomfortably aware that while he feels safe, his loved ones are still at risk from the virus.
 
"I feel guilty, I feel very sad, because I want all my family safe," Daiq told Reuters.
 
 
 
Coronavirus vaccines transferred to the PA 
 
"When you see that you can get these services, the vaccination, and all of the family, they can't get this vaccination, you feel that there is a difference between you and your family."
 
Although Israel and the Palestinian Authority coordinate on security issues, political relations have foundered. Negotiations last broke down in 2014.
 
In January, the Palestinian Foreign Ministry accused Israel of ignoring its duties as an occupying power by not including Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip in their inoculation program.
 
 
 
Palestinian Hamas policemen patrol on empty streets amid the ongoing coronavirus COVID-19 pandemic in Gaza
 
Israeli officials have said that this is the job of the Palestinian authorities.
 
"If it is the responsibility of the Israeli health minister to take care of the Palestinians, what exactly is the responsibility of the Palestinian health minister?" Israeli Health Minister Yuli Edelstein told the BBC last month.
 
While Israel has so far vaccinated a third of its 9 million citizens, the Palestinian Authority received its first batch of 2,000 vaccines - supplied by Israel - on Monday. West Bank health workers received the first shots.
 
Daiq said he tried to avoid the subject with his family, because his mother kept asking him when she would be inoculated.
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Women in Gaza determined to overcome economic, social challenges
 
In the closed-off and poverty-stricken coastal enclave, women are starting to take a far more active role in male-dominated economic and social life, but many challenges remain on the road to success for the Strip's female entrepreneurs
 
Dec 24, 2020
 
 
Palestinians in the tiny coastal enclave of Gaza, home to over 2 million people, are struggling to survive in the dire reality of worsening health and economic crises through the efforts of youth who have started to think out of the box.
 
Women, in particular, are showing greater and greater independence and engaging in “male domains,” despite many significant restrictions and challenges.
 
 
 
Alnajjar, Qudaih and Aburok working the land they rented in the Khuza'a area 
 
Aseel Alnajjar, Ghaida Qudaih and Nadeen Aburok, three female university graduates from the Khuza’a area, in the southern governorate of Khan Yunis, have impressive academic and voluntary work track records, yet they never found any paid work.
 
The young women refused to surrender to unemployment and took matters into their own hands: They rented a 3-dunam (0.74-acre) plot of land and planted, with the help of a young man, a pea crop.
 
“Our [academic] specialties have nothing to do with agriculture but we want to be productive individuals,” said 24-years-old Qudaih.
 
“What helped us to do it is that we live in a rural community that basically depends on agriculture and our families have good experience in that field. Moreover, we make sure to consult agronomists before taking any step and we have a fourth friend named Khalil, who helps us doing the hard work,” she added.
 
It was then that they then managed to expand their operation adds her friend Alnajjar.
 
“There is a local association that decided to help us after seeing our work in planting the pea crop, so they provided us with irrigation networks, seeds and pesticides, which enabled us to rent 5 more dunams [1.24 acres] to plant carrots,” she said.
 
Their small enterprise did so well that four men, also university graduates, joined the team to help work both plots, Qudaih said.
 
However, many challenges remain on the road to success for the female entrepreneurs.
 
 
 
The first female Palestinian taxi driver in the Gaza Strip, Nayla Abu Jubba
 
The land is only 500 meters from the border [with Israel, which is considered an access restricted area]. Moreover, the entire agricultural area is uninhabited, so there is a risk of attack from dangerous stray animals. Not to mention the heavy cost of irrigation and the continual power cuts, but we are planning to plant more than one crop a year to minimize our losses,” Alnajjar added.
 
Another brave female is Naela Abu Jubba, who chose to go a little bit further and become the Strip’s first female taxi driver, for women passengers only.
 
Abu Jubba, a mother of five and the head of a seven-member household, named her taxi service “Almukhtar,” the feminine of an Arabic term meaning the person in charge/the leader, referring to her strong personality.
 
She managed to add a second car to the service, yet her business, which started two months ago, is going through rough times due to the COVID-19 outbreak.
 
Because of the lockdown measures, “the situation is very miserable. I only get between three and four fares a week,” she said. 
 
“A woman should be free to make her own decisions and choose her own way of making a living. I do face challenges, such as bullying, but I keep moving forward and pay no attention to those who negatively impact me,” Abu Jubba added.
 
 
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In reply toRe: msg 6
bml00

From: bml00

Feb-27

The days of the Nomad in Israel are over 

BM

In reply toRe: msg 7
bml00

From: bml00

Feb-27

Israeli Arabs + Legal Palestinians daily workers are fully entitled to their two shots there is no reason for any delay .

Currently the two groups not responding to the call for Vaccination are the Hassidic Jewish Population and the Israeli Arab society and accordingly both are suffering far greater rates of infection than the rest of the Israeli Population 

BM

In reply toRe: msg 8
bml00

From: bml00

Feb-27

GAZA is a MALE dominated society led by Hamas which itself takes its instructions from Iran .

I see no changes yet on the Horizon for these people under their current leadership .

BM

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