Coalition of the Confused

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Confused malcontents swilling Chardonnay while awaiting the Zombie Apocalypse.

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Mass shootings in the US   America - all of it

Started 10/3/17 by Jenifer (Zarknorph); 68656 views.
Bike (URALTOURIST1)

From: Bike (URALTOURIST1)

10/4/17

10 suitcases could easily hold a dozen or more significant weapons, and being a well known high roller, he was expected to be a bit eccentric.  Heck, he may have had the bellboy cart the suitcases up for him.

The Ft Hood guy was a Major in the Army Medical Corps and used his personal handgun weapon that he had on base illegally.  As I said, military bases are the safest places on the planet against illegal weapons use, the Nadal Massacre was such an aberration that the rules of normal events did not apply.  Handguns and enough ammunition to cause real grief can be carried easily, especially if wearing BDU (Battle Dress Utility) or field baggy uniforms with many pockets.  These combat based uniforms of many pockets are a recent change, used to be the only time you saw them was in the field or on maneuvers, now they are used as general utility for everyone instead of old style relaxed uniforms.

Bike (URALTOURIST1)

From: Bike (URALTOURIST1)

10/4/17

These are the Beach Lifeguards and paramedic staff on beaches.  Not sure I see any real need for rifle prepared lifeguards but the ones with these are and will be sworn police qualified persons, pretty much as many are already designated.  The tower sitters are usually not armed but the vehicle officers are most likely pistol equipped as we speak.

HWPeeler (HPeeler)

From: HWPeeler (HPeeler)

10/4/17

Paddock was in that hotel room for three days. He had lots of time to make trips from car to room. It was illegal to have a gun in the hotel / casino but no metal detectors to spot them.

Motive?

I am guessing he really did not want the ex-wife to get anything in the divorce. The law suits against his estate will tie it up for ever.

Questions ... was he fatally ill? Autopsy will tell. Did he really hate his ex-wife so bad that he justified killing so many people. His girl friend might have an answer here.

I don't think he had any anger for the crowd. They just happen to be convenient.

HWPeeler (HPeeler)

From: HWPeeler (HPeeler)

10/4/17

Coldert is a comedian. Saying Trump ought to do something is a housewife's wisdom.

smilingeorge

From: smilingeorge

10/4/17

Most likely Fox news. 

Jenifer (Zarknorph)

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

10/4/17

Bike (URALTOURIST1) said:

How is it that the safest gun free place in America had a massacre?

That's a good question.  Another question is where is the mental health support for the US armed forces?  Is there a culture of 'suck it up, soldier', that discourages troubled service men and women from seeking help?

Jenifer (Zarknorph)

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

10/4/17

Hey Peeler,
Welcome!  Welcome!  Welcome!  
HWPeeler (HPeeler) said:

Paddock was in that hotel room for three days. He had lots of time to make trips from car to room. It was illegal to have a gun in the hotel / casino but no metal detectors to spot them.

I was wondering about metal detectors.  He did move rooms, though.  so all those guns had to move too.

HWPeeler (HPeeler) said:

Questions ... was he fatally ill? Autopsy will tell.

However, he likely shot himself in the head, so any brain tumor or mental illness could be unable to detect.

HWPeeler (HPeeler) said:

His girl friend might have an answer here.

She was sent home to the Philippines, then he wired her $100,000 to buy a home for her and her family.  She thought it was his way of breaking up with her.

HWPeeler (HPeeler) said:

I don't think he had any anger for the crowd. They just happen to be convenient.

True.  It could have been a Lorde concert or a rapper.  If it was the rapper, then we'd be in a racial shitstorm right now.  Lorde?  Mostly young girls, like the Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, so ISIS would be more believable.  They still keep claiming responsibility - I'm glad everyone is ignoring them.  

Cheers,

Jenifer

Jenifer (Zarknorph)

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

10/4/17

smilingeorge said:

Most likely Fox news. 

HAH!!!

Wouldn't surprise me!

Cheers,

Jenifer

Oomp (AstroLib)

From: Oomp (AstroLib)

10/4/17

  31440.1 
 
 

The mass killing in Las Vegas tells me that maybe it's time to re-float an idea I had a few years back,  one that I couldn't spread too widely, but which was greeted with sputtering vitriol whenever a gun  aficionado came across it.

I re-posted it to a liberal forum last night, and let's see how it's greeted  in a pretty neutral venue like this one.

In brief: Schools, theaters, clubs, concert venues,  government offices, banks,  Walmarts and corner stores:  I'd venture that it's better for them to  know that someone with a gun is approaching than it is to only find out when they hear/feel  the shots.

Requiring that all firearms sold in the USA have non-removable transponders /RFIDs implanted in their frames would mean that anyone approaching a door with a scanner/reader mounted on it would instantly send an alert to the facility's security person/department. Security could decide how to respond before the potential shooter gets in, from remotely locking the access door to  alerting local police via an internet connection similar to the connections that credit card processors use. Or the "alert" can say "Principal Skinner's carrying his fancy-pants Sig Sauer today.  No big deal."

A scanner on the front of a police car can tell the cop (and the cop's supervisor) if he has to  use extreme caution in dealing with that burnt-out taillight he's busting.

The chips, installed by the gun manufacturer, would contain identification  information, eg Serial #ABC123 456: Savage 12-guage pump action shotgun etc. Security responders know exactly what sort of threat they're facing...

It goes on and on, but one little feature I kinda like is this: Let's say a gun is used in a gas station hold up. The scanners captured the info and forwarded it to a central  processor. Again much like credit card processing, where "lost or stolen card" alerts are sent instantly to retailers  when a card is run through a scanner, so  a "wanted in gas station robbery" alert can be sent to the nearest police station should  a "wanted" weapon show up at a McDonald's or Burger King...

And a hotel desk clerk can call the local cops and say "Some guy just checked in here carrying a dozen automatic rifles. He asked for a room with a good view of the concert across the street. Whaddya think?"

I think the cops just might think of something to do before the bullets start killing spectators. Maybe.

You'll notice there was nothing here that said "this guy can buy a gun, that guy can't."  The closest thing to infringing" here is that the gun owner is made aware  some businesses/establishments  will know that he's carrying.

The biggest problem I see with this is that it'll take a long, long time (decades) for the "chipped" weapons to replace the millions of older guns still out there, and today's society wants instant solutions to everything...

So whaddya think?
Thanks

-Oomp

 

Jenifer (Zarknorph)

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

10/4/17

Hi Oomp,

Oomp (AstroLib) said:

In brief: Schools, theaters, clubs, concert venues,  government offices, banks,  Walmarts and corner stores:  I'd venture that it's better for them to  know that someone with a gun is approaching than it is to only find out when they hear/feel  the shots.

Also petrol stations, as the getaway car is right there

Oomp (AstroLib) said:

Requiring that all firearms sold in the USA have non-removable transponders /RFIDs implanted in their frames would mean that anyone approaching a door with a scanner/reader mounted on it would instantly send an alert to the facility's security person/department.

I just watched a video in a conservative forum (I know what you mean about differing views) where a woman converted her semi-automatic machine gun to fully automatic in under two minutes.

A 'non-removable' chip is just waiting for someone to figure out how to remove it, then post that online.

Oomp (AstroLib) said:

The biggest problem I see with this is that it'll take a long, long time (decades) for the "chipped" weapons to replace the millions of older guns still out there, and today's society wants instant solutions to everything...

True, also there would be a massive shitstorm over civil liberties.  

But let's play out an easily foreseeable tragedy.

Principal Skinner buys a second hand gun from a pawn shop.  He is fully licensed and lives in a state where it is legal to carry a concealed weapon.  Unbeknownst to him, that gun was used in an armed robbery.  It's chip is flagged.  He pulls up at a gas station and the chip triggers an alarm.  The attendant follows procedure and activates the alarm.  The security officer draws his weapon and demands Skinner drop his.  Skinner opens his jacket, removes his gun from a holster, the security guard panics and Skinner is shot.

The standard argument from gun advocates is that the weapon is blamed, not the person.

My thoughts are this:

  • Stronger background checks for gun licenses
  • Gun manufacturers MUST make their guns tamper-proof
  • More funding for mental health
  • Metal detectors and x-ray scanners at concert events

Your idea has some merit, though.  And frankly no one else seems to have any!

Cheers,

Jenifer

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