Coalition of the Confused

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Time to go, Jules   Australia and Oceania

Started 1/11/18 by Jenifer (Zarknorph); 24216 views.
Jenifer (Zarknorph)

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

1/11/18

WikiLeaks: Ecuador wants Julian Assange out of its embassy. Deporting him to Australia is one option

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Ecuador is hoping it can break a long impasse that has seen WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange holed up in its London embassy for five years.

It is seeking a third-party mediator to broker a deal with the United Kingdom in an effort to find a way for Mr Assange, who is an Australian citizen, to leave their building.

Ecuador has been "considering and exploring the possibility of a mediation" to resolve the issue.

Mr Assange was accused of raping two women in Sweden in 2010 and was subsequently arrested in London.

He was released on bail whilst fighting extradition to Sweden, but after losing his appeal in 2012 he sought asylum at the Ecuadorian embassy in London.

Mr Assange has been in the small embassy in Knightsbridge ever since.

Sweden has subsequently dropped all investigations against Mr Assange, but he continues to fear extradition to the United States.

His website WikiLeaks published leaked intelligence from the United States and although it has not sought his arrest, Mr Assange is concerned the US is still considering prosecuting him.

Ecuador's Foreign Minister, Maria Fernanda Espinosa, certainly seems keen to have Mr Assange out of the embassy.

"A person cannot live in those conditions forever," she said.

Not only is it difficult having a permanent asylum seeker in the very small embassy, it leaves Ecuador with tricky diplomatic relations with all the other countries involved — the UK, the US and Sweden.

Ecuador is hoping an international dignitary with experience in negotiations can act as a mediator, or a country not currently involved in the diplomatic tussle.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-01-11/could-julian-assange-be-deported-from-ecuador-embassy/9321004

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I, personally, don't like Julian Assange (the man).  But I will always respect Wikileaks for showing the world how terrible mistakes can be made and even in war, murder is murder.

In reply toRe: msg 1
Jenifer (Zarknorph)

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

1/12/18

Julian Assange granted Ecuadorian citizenship to provide 'another layer of protection'

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Ecuador has granted citizenship to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange after more than five years of living in asylum at the nation's embassy in London, officials have announced.

Key points:

  • The new citizenship status appears to change little for Mr Assange in the immediate future
  • Ecuador is trying to make Mr Assange a member of its diplomatic team, which would grant him additional rights
  • But Britain's Foreign Office said earlier it had rejected Ecuador's request to give him diplomatic status

Foreign Minister Maria Fernanda Espinosa said officials accepted Mr Assange's request for naturalisation in December, and they continue to look for a long-term resolution to a situation that has vexed officials since 2012.

"What naturalisation does is provide the asylum seeker another layer of protection," Ms Espinosa said.

The new citizenship status, however, appears to change little for Mr Assange in the immediate future. He would still need to alert British authorities of any movement outside the embassy.

Ms Espinosa said Ecuador was trying to make Mr Assange a member of its diplomatic team, which would grant him additional rights under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, including special legal immunity and safe passage.

Britain's Foreign Office said earlier on Thursday it had rejected Ecuador's request to grant Mr Assange diplomatic status in the UK.

"Ecuador knows that the way to resolve this issue is for Julian Assange to leave the embassy to face justice," the office said.

Though protected by Ecuador, the relationship between Mr Assange and the nation's leaders has at times been dicey.

Ecuador has repeatedly urged Mr Assange not to interfere in the affairs of other countries following his frequent online comments on international issues.

The biggest crisis came in October 2016, when the embassy cut his internet service after WikiLeaks published a trove of emails from then-US presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's campaign.

He was also a point of contention in Ecuador's 2017 presidential election. Conservative candidate Guillermo Lasso pledged to evict the Australian within 30 days of taking office, while current President Lenin Moreno said he would allow him to stay.

Mr Assange later taunted after Mr Lasso's loss that he would "cordially invite Lasso to leave Ecuador within 30 days".

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Jenifer (Zarknorph)

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

2/14/18

Julian Assange has one of his worst days as judge rips apart legal case

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Julian Assange has suffered one of his worst days in the long-running battle that began with publication of classified documents in 2010.

His actions — and the defence of them — were forensically pulled apart by District Court Judge Emma Arbuthnot in a 30-minute judgment that left his supporters reeling.

Ms Arbuthnot said the WikiLeaks founder, holed up in Ecuador's London embassy, lacked "courage".

"Defendants on bail up and down the country, and requested persons facing extradition, come to court to face the consequences of their own choices," she said.

"He should have the courage to do so too."

The public gallery was full of journalists and supporters, some of whom stood along the wall and sat on the stairs.

There were gasps in the gallery from Mr Assange's backers as the judge laid out her blistering assessment of his legal team's arguments.  But it was more than that.

At times it felt like a character assessment that went beyond what was needed for this ruling.

"The impression I have, and this may well be dispelled if and when Mr Assange finally appears in court, is that he is a man who wants to impose his terms on the course of justice, whether the course of justice is in this jurisdiction or in Sweden," Ms Arbuthnot read from her prepared ruling.

The hearing was the second attempt by Mr Assange to have the arrest warrant hanging over him removed.

It has been in place since 2012, when he skipped bail after being wanted for questioning in Sweden over alleged sex assault allegations.

He has argued that he feared extradition to the US and that the end game was to see him punished for WikiLeaks' work.

But the judge didn't accept that either.

"I do not accept that Sweden would have rendered Mr Assange to the United States," she said.

"If that had happened there would have been a diplomatic crisis between the UK, Sweden and the US, which would have affected international relationships and extradition proceedings between the states."

And she said if the US had asked for his extradition he could have appealed that through the British court system.

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-02-14/julian-assange-one-of-his-worst-days/9444888

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Oh, I like her!

smilingeorg

From: smilingeorg

2/14/18

I'm sure the white house would take him him. He helped getting the orange one elected and treats women badly. Their kinda guy. 

Jenifer (Zarknorph)

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

2/15/18

The more I learn about Assange, the more he becomes just another self-serving, narcissistic dickhead on the web.

He certainly has the disloyalty and apathy for anyone but himself - so, yeah!  He'd fit right in in politics.

Did you know he has a Wikileaks party here in the senate?

None of them got in.  But he was on the ballot.

Cheers,

Jenifer

In reply toRe: msg 5
Jenifer (Zarknorph)

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

3/29/18

Julian Assange has internet access cut off by Ecuador's Government

Who is he without the internet?

Ecuador's Government says it has cut off WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange's internet access at the nation's London embassy after his recent activity on social media decrying the arrest of a Catalonian separatist leader.

Key points:

  • Julian Assange questioned the blaming of Moscow in spy poisoning case
  • Ecuador granted Mr Assange asylum in 2012
  • British Government minister calls Mr Assange a 'miserable little worm'

In a statement, officials said Mr Assange's recent posts "put at risk" the good relations Ecuador maintains with nations throughout Europe and had decided as of Tuesday to suspend his internet access, "in order to prevent any potential harm".

Mr Assange had also questioned accusations Moscow was responsible for the poisoning of former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia with a nerve agent on British soil.

He has since gone silent on social media.

The South American nation has repeatedly tried to find a solution that would allow Mr Assange to leave without the threat of arrest, but with no success.

He remains subject to arrest in Britain for skipping bail and also fears a possible US extradition request based on his leaking of classified US State Department documents.

Relations between Mr Assange and his host nation have often grown prickly.

Ecuador suspended his internet access in 2016 after a WikiLeaks dump targeting Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign.

Former president Rafael Correa hailed Mr Assange's work but the nation's current head of state has called him a hacker and warned him not to meddle in politics.

Mr Assange faces arrest by British authorities for breaching his bail terms should he step outside the embassy.

"It's of great regret that Julian Assange remains in the Ecuador embassy," junior minister Alan Duncan said during a question-and-answer session on foreign affairs in Parliament's House of Commons.

"It's about time that this miserable little worm walked out of the embassy and gave himself up to British justice."

Mr Assange responded to Mr Duncan's comment with a tweet.

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Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

7/28/18

Are you still here?!

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange cannot stay in Ecuador's London embassy forever, the country's president says.

Key points:

  • Ecuador's President wants a guarantee that Mr Assange's life will not be in danger
  • Mr Moreno has been in contact with the British Government about ending Mr Assange's stay
  • Mr Assange was wanted for questioning in Sweden over an alleged sex crime

President Lenin Moreno also said he did not support Mr Assange's leaking, but wanted to guarantee his life was not put in danger if he were to leave the embassy.

"I have never been in favour of Mr Assange's activity," Mr Moreno said during a trip to Madrid, where he met Spain's King Felipe and Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez following a three-day visit to the UK.

"I have never agreed with the interventions in people's private emails in order to obtain information, however valuable it may be, to bring out certain undesirable acts of governments or people, not in that way.

"There are correct and legal ways to do it."

Mr Moreno also confirmed he had been in contact with the British Government about ending Mr Assange's stay at the embassy, where he has been since seeking asylum there in 2012.

"We are constantly talking with the British Government, with the ambassador, who is their representative in Ecuador," he said.

"The only person I've never talked to is Mr Assange."

Mr Moreno said the previous Ecuadorian Government considered Mr Assange's life was in danger and that he could potentially face the death penalty if extradited to the US.

"In Ecuador there is no death penalty and we know that this possibility existed," Mr Moreno said.

"That's why all we want is the guarantee that his life will not be in danger."

Relations between Mr Assange and his host nation have often grown prickly.

Ecuador suspended his internet access in 2016 after a WikiLeaks dump targeting Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign.

It was cut again this year over Mr Assange's social media activity decrying the arrest of a Catalonian separatist leader.

Mr Assange had also questioned accusations Moscow was responsible for the poisoning of former spy Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia with a nerve agent.

Di (amina046)

From: Di (amina046)

7/28/18

l also question Moscow's responsibility in those poisonings. Not because they are not capable of it, but because the some of their fiercest enemies, Chechens, Ukrainians etc. are equally ruthless ( who is Ruth btw), and stand to gain by Putin's disrepute, and have access to the same chemicals.

Now of course he might be looking for Russian support, because he has reall nowhere to go.

Ecuador has been more than patient, I think only Cadinal Mindszenty has been in a longer Embassy exile, the Brits have been very inflexible, they should have let him go to Ecuador, and the Swedes should have givn up that he said she said case.

I  have no sympathy for him, but wikileaks has been useful in many ways.

Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

7/29/18

I don't like Julian Assange, the man.

I think he puts his own agenda ahead of "the mission"

The Weekly: Wikileaks

Wikileaks became famous exposing the world's secrets But there's a lot about them that you may not know.. #TheWeekly

Di (amina046)

From: Di (amina046)

7/29/18

Also, Ecuador gave him citizenship!

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