Coalition of the Confused

Hosted by Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Confused malcontents swilling Chardonnay while awaiting the Zombie Apocalypse.

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Brazil   America - all of it

Started 8/22/19 by Jenifer (Zarknorph); 6076 views.
In reply toRe: msg 7
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

8/24/19

BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

8/24/19

Jenifer (Zarknorph) said:

The first world will only care when it starts to directly effect their day to day lives.

Good point.

Except we have a habit of blaming minorities or "the war" for these kind of shortages. We'll just carry on killing more Muslims, over and above the 60 or 600 million we kill with Phase I of Holocaust II.

In reply toRe: msg 9
ElDotardo

From: ElDotardo

8/24/19

Amazon Fire History Since 2003

We are told that Amazon fires are at record levels right now. This is a blatant lie. The only “record” is that Amazonian fires have DECREASED over the “record”.

This is what we are being told.

Fig 1: Screen Shot of Google Search (search term: Amazon Fires at Record)

This (is) what the data actually looks like, to August 22. Yes, its updated daily.

Fig 2: Amazon Fire Totals via MODIS (2019 is highlighted)

This comes from a wonderful site, https://www.globalfiredata.org/forecast.html#elbeni

It uses NASA MODIS data, from the Terra and Aqua satellites, and is updated daily. By going to the website, you can look at individual regions in the Amazon, or as I have done, look at the totals for the Amazon. This site also has global data, but I am only looking at the Amazon region here.

The Interactive Graphs are very informative. Hovering the cursor over the graph will show the data at that point.

You can highlight individual years, by clicking on a year in the legend at the bottom of the graph. That year remains bright, while the rest are dimmed. Using Eyeball Mark 1 Trend Indicator (EBM1TI), 2019 is slightly high, but not at record levels. Not even close.

One thing I saw by looking at each year, was a rough pattern – one or two bad years, one or two years at much lower levels, then a bad year. This pattern is there until 2010. 2010 was the last “bad year”. Levels since 2010 have been 1/2 or less of the “bad years”. The old pattern has been broken.

Not only does this site calculate number of fires, it also calculates carbon emissions (in Tg) from the fires. Note that the site issues a caveat about estimated later data, hence its grayed out.

This emissions chart from the website shows what I was talking about, in alternating bad/good years. But as I said, only until 2010. It is obvious there is a reducing trend in emissions, again using EBM1TI.

Again, by hovering the cursor over the bar chart, you can look at data points. Clicking on a legend at the bottom will highlight that series.

Is it significant? Dunno. I need to download and trend the data. I can say definitively, that there is no increasing trend, and 2019 is a LOONNGG way from record territory.

 

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BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

8/24/19

ElDotardo said:

We are told that Amazon fires are at record levels right now. This is a blatant lie. The only “record” is that Amazonian fires have DECREASED over the “record”.

Unfortunately, you're probably right - Brazil was starting to do a good job in protecting the forest.

That's now changed dramatically, with open season on burning the forest and seizing the land.

Can BDS stop it? I don't know - I somehow fear that 2019 is the point at which climate catastrophe really starts to roar.

Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

8/25/19

Fire is not bad for a forest, but if the land is not managed properly, then the fires can be devastating.

The outlining cattle industry was doing pretty dodgy things before the fire started, but we may never know what triggered the inferno.

It was interesting to learn about stick fires on my trip.

For tens of thousands of years Aboriginals would wander across the Northern Territory, over the six seasons, burning the land behind them as they left.  Just in small, segmented places to create fire breaks, deplete the fire's fuel and encourage regrowth.

Then the Australian government took over places like Uluru (Ayers Rock) and made it a National Park - thus kicking all Aboriginals off their ancestral land.

They set no fires, had no clue how to manage the land and - of course - massive fires ripped through the entire area.

Now the land has been handed back and the custodians took back control of the burning, now with help from the government.  I saw evidence of it all through my trip.  Just breaks of black earth in seemingly random places, but probably made more sense from an aerial view.

When you hear about bushfires in Australia, they are not in the Northern Territory - the hottest part of the country with the most lightning strikes.

I wonder if the tribes still living in the Amazon with no contact with the outside world could instruct everyone on how to manage the rainforest.

And how did Captain America get into that old gif?

In reply toRe: msg 13
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

8/26/19

In reply toRe: msg 14
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

8/29/19

What the fuck is WRONG with this guy?!


In reply toRe: msg 15
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

9/25/19

We have a new contender for worst world leader.


PTG (anotherPTG)

From: PTG (anotherPTG)

9/25/19

Are the images from space fake news then?

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