Coalition of the Confused

Hosted by Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Confused malcontents swilling Chardonnay while awaiting the Zombie Apocalypse.

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Royal Navy legacy   The U.K and Europe

Started 11/30/19 by Harold27Z; 1140 views.
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

12/2/19

If they hadn't done the last one I would not be sitting here typing this.

And I can forgive Johnny Depp pretty much anything.

Harold27Z

From: Harold27Z

12/2/19

Right.  You might have been typing it anywhere between Brighton and Hove.

Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

12/3/19

Given how stinking hot it is today, I'd take the switch.

Harold27Z

From: Harold27Z

12/3/19

Tell me about it.  My offsprings are sunburned red. Fortunately we just go red then back to White, not brown.  Once I was so badly sunburned I could barely walk for a few days.  I needed a cortizone inhection.

BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

12/3/19

Harold27Z said:

Proud of it losing 15-20% of conscripted sailors due to scurvy ? 

The British had never had conscription until 1916.

Unlike our dear cousins, who seem to have been conscripting all men under the age of 40 into slave patrols as early as 1776.

Harold27Z

From: Harold27Z

12/3/19

You are contradicting yourself.  Most sailors had no choice. They were forced to be sailors in  the olden days.

BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

12/3/19

Harold27Z said:

You are contradicting yourself.  Most sailors had no choice. They were forced to be sailors in  the olden days.

Farm labourers went down to Portsmouth, sought out the pubs where recruitment was going on, accepted drinks from the recruiters and signed up to join the Navy.

Years later a few of them came back to their villages and boasted of their adventures all over the world.

Many more jumped ship and spread the English language all over the world.

Harold27Z

From: Harold27Z

12/3/19

Whatever you say.

bml00

From: bml00

12/3/19

Harry maybe a racist but Berry is a liar - the British Navy press ganged their crews they were neither conscripts nor farm labourers out for a days scrumping , they were historically jumped bundled onto to boats regardless of their opinions on whether they wanted to go or not

Apparently jumping ship also spread the English language , you of course also ended hanging from the yard arm so chatting to the locals would have been short lived

It is rare to see such shit but goood to see Berry write it https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Impressment

At the time of the Battle of Trafalgar over half the Royal Navy's 120,000 sailors were pressed men. 

  • Edited December 3, 2019 3:02 am  by  bml00
BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

12/3/19

Harold27Z said:

Whatever you say.

I'm serious - even BM's anti-British reference makes it clear that conscription was simply regular recruitment of people:

People liable to impressment were "eligible men of seafaring habits between the ages of 18 and 55 years". Non-seamen were impressed as well, though rarely. 

Essentially, people who'd left their farms and become fishermen. Or been drawn to Portsmouth by the loose women and free beer.

The rest of the relevant sections are just anti-British arm-waving.

Impressment was strongly criticized by those who believed it to be contrary to the British constitution

Some wealthy kids were surely kidnapped into the Navy too and their parents protested.

... unlike many of its continental rivals at the time, British subjects were not subject to conscription for military service, with the exception of a brief experiment with army impressment from 1778 to 1780. ... The U.S. Continental Navy also applied a form of impressment during the American War of Independence.

More anti-British nonsense:

The impressment of seamen from American ships caused serious tensions between Britain and the Thirteen Colonies in the years leading up to the Revolutionary War. One of the 27 colonial grievances directly highlights the practice.[1] It was again a cause of tension leading up to the War of 1812. After the defeat of Napoleon in 1814, Britain ended the practice; later conscription was not limited to the Royal Navy but covered all armed forces.

Notice the deliberate concealment in this propaganda tirade - there was 102 years of non-conscription, including the entire 99 years of Pax Britannica!

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