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Military Guns and Ammunition

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This is intended for people interested in the subject of military guns and their ammunition, with emphasis on automatic weapons.

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NGSW Phase 2 Consolidation and info   Small Arms <20mm

Started 30/8/19 by gatnerd; 458804 views.
smg762

From: smg762

28-Jan

Both rounds have about 600ft lbs from a 16 inch barrel.

given slow propellants and a 24 inch barrel, they will stretch to 750lbs or so.

SiverSurfeR

From: SiverSurfeR

28-Jan

Thank you for the welcoming. I used the blueprint imagery to visualize a way to integrate the NGWS but everything still on the works. How the squad will eventually adapt to a fast changing tech still to be seen.

As such, Lt. Gen. Eric Smith, deputy commandant of Combat Development and Integration, recognized the critic voices of the "arms room" concept focusing on those who say it won't work to the infantry automatic rifle with improved optic. (A matter with its own interesting thread here).

"You have basically trained Marines hitting targets all day long at 500, 700, 800 meters that used to be the range of school-trained snipers," Smith said. "[They're] hitting them all day long because the weapon system and its heavier barrel and the optic that goes with it means basically trained Marines can pick it up and pop individual targets out at ranges that used to be the sole domain of a sniper."

Regarding the introduction of the new Organic Precision Fires-Infantry loitering munitions, or OPR-I, Smith said Marines can strike targets "well beyond what a 60mm or 81mm mortar can do."

"You may not need that mortarman to do that,"  he said. "... So I would tell the ['arms room'] naysayers, 'Hey, give it a minute.'"

And then goes on to say that: "The change could ultimately lead to a single military occupational specialty for all infantry personnel."

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Farmplinker

From: Farmplinker

28-Jan

If the Marines go in on the "Infantryman MOS", you're going to find the same people get issued the same weapons, despite what doctrine says.

gatnerd

From: gatnerd

28-Jan

NGSW-FC article by Popular Mechanics. Archived to bypass paywall:

https://archive.fo/73pzL

This stood out to me; we may see the M4A1 also fitted with the NGSW-FC.

The Army has stated it will only procure about 100,000 of the new rifles and automatic rifles, but the new NGSW-FC contract is for up to 250,000 optics, meaning the Army will now buy more new rifles or will backfit the optic to the M4A1.

SiverSurfeR

From: SiverSurfeR

28-Jan

Thank you for the article. That's exactly my forecast about this program: A degree of retrofit implementation of its new technologies with a more cautious approach towards the ultimate goal of  fully replacing the current crop.

poliorcetes

From: poliorcetes

28-Jan

Maybe the chamber alignment problem precluded Textron's adoption. Who knows

I really would like to know how was possible to offer such a defective proposal after more than 20 years of testing. 

stancrist

From: stancrist

28-Jan

I really would like to see confirmation from either Textron or the Army that Textron is no longer in the competition.

I found nothing to that effect on Textron's news page, or on the CT weapons page.  CT Weapons | Textron Systems

stancrist

From: stancrist

28-Jan

The Army has stated it will only procure about 100,000 of the new rifles and automatic rifles, but the new NGSW-FC contract is for up to 250,000 optics, meaning the Army will now buy more new rifles or will backfit the optic to the M4A1.

Hmm.  Does "up to" 250,000 optics mean that exact number definitely will be purchased, or does it mean that the buyer has the option to purchase any quantity from 1-250,000 at the contract price?

gatnerd

From: gatnerd

28-Jan

poliorcetes said:

I really would like to know how was possible to offer such a defective proposal after more than 20 years of testing

The G11 provides an excellent example. The technology was extremely promising, resulting in continued funding for 30 years, even though after 30 years it still didnt work. 

The US SPIW/ACR efforts with Flechettes offers a similar example. US worked with flechettes and or hyperburst flechettes from 60's to 90's, because the technology looked really promising...ACR trials showed they didnt work either. In fact, the leader of that flechette effort - AAI - went on to be absorbed by Textron and head up the LSAT/NGSW program...

  • Edited 28 January 2022 22:10  by  gatnerd
gatnerd

From: gatnerd

28-Jan

stancrist said:

the option to purchase any quantity from 1-250,000 at the contract price?

I think its the option. But its interesting that they are considering that option; it implies they are considering either buying more then 100k NGSW's or retrofitting M4's with FC's. Either of which is worth note. 

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