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Military Guns and Ammunition

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British Paratrooper breaks into USA home   General Military Discussion

Started 14-Jul by TonyDiG; 576 views.
autogun

From: autogun

16-Jul

Reminds me of a WW2 anecdote concerning a mission assigned to a Gurkha unit which involved a parachute drop (not something they had practised). After the officer's briefing, the men looked very worried - unusual for the Gurkhas who were usually fearless. When the officer asked their NCO what was wrong, he responded "could the pilot please fly very low and very slow". Further questioning revealed that he had forgotten to mention the use of parachutes...

Murpat

From: Murpat

17-Jul

"Stunned" .... yes, having fallen 6000 ft and - knowing - your 'chute hadn't opened - stunned to be alive.

I expect though - he received a very  stiffly worded note from his laundress.

Hpe he bought a ticket in El Gordo.

In reply toRe: msg 3
TonyDiG

From: TonyDiG

17-Jul

If he gets a "stiffly worded note" it may be from the jump master as it looks like that he didn't pull the reserve chute.  See the pouch on his belly?  Does not look like it was deployed.
 

Murpat

From: Murpat

17-Jul

That - as well!

With his kit - he would be travelling at say 130/140 feet per second (the kit would make it more than the usual human terminal speed) and as the article says - opening at 6,000 feet, only 40 seconds to decide. The main chute did deploy so he may have thought all was well.

In reply toRe: msg 5
TonyDiG

From: TonyDiG

19-Jul

OK, it's been over 40 years since my last civilian jump, but it was drilled into us over and over that the first thing you do after you deploy your chute is check it to see if it opened correctly or not.  "Not" or "partially open" meant "pull the reserve."  In case of a partially opened chute, there was a special procedure to hold on to the reserve chute and shake it out by hand such that it did not foul the partially opened main chute.  This, again, was drilled into us many times before you made your first jump and you had to show you still remembered the procedure before you made subsequent jumps.  So, that's why I was checking the photo to see if the reserve was pulled or not.  I was surprised to see that it was not.

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