gatnerd

Military Guns and Ammunition

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This is intended for people interested in the subject of military guns and their ammunition, with emphasis on automatic weapons.

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True Velocity polymer case ammo   Ammunition <20mm

Started 17/11/17 by gatnerd; 12051 views.
gatnerd

From: gatnerd

17/11/17

Spotted this on instagram. Apparently a new company called True Velocity is working on bringing a new style of Polymer Case ammo to market. Per the instagram chatter, seems like they were originally trying to reduce ammo weight for miniguns in aircraft, no idea if that is actually true. 

https://www.instagram.com/p/BbiOYK_hGaC/?hl=en&taken-by=bat.defense

The company is opening up a 60,000 sq ft plant in Texas:

http://www.plasticsnews.com/article/20170109/NEWS/170109916/polymer-ammunition-maker-building-texas-plant

And has a whole bunch of patents:

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/9429407.html

 

What's interesting is that this ammo seems to use an internal metal base/primer pocket, which from the patents is Metal Injection Molded (MIM). This is substantially different then a normal polymer hybrid case, which uses a cut down standard brass or steel casehead with a polymer body:

The internal metal base should make for a lighter case, but beyond that I don't know. Still seemed like an interesting development. Between Shell Shock cases, these new Polymer hybrid cases, and LSAT, it does seem like lightweight ammo is almost a reality. 

 

autogun

From: autogun

19/11/17

It will be interesting to see how this one works out. 

Now we want to see Emeric's neckless polymer cases emerging to join in the tussle - they have certain advantages over the others (i.e. designed for use in unmodified existing weapons, but able to use low-drag bullets).

 

gatnerd

From: gatnerd

19/11/17

"Now we want to see Emeric's neckless polymer cases emerging to join in the tussle - they have certain advantages over the others (i.e. designed for use in unmodified existing weapons, but able to use low-drag bullets)"

Could you share some more info about the Neckless Cartridges? I recall reading about them here - but completely forgot everything but the name "neckless." 

Meanwhile, google image search turns up:

stancrist

From: stancrist

20/11/17

gatnerd said...

Between Shell Shock cases, these new Polymer hybrid cases, and LSAT, it does seem like lightweight ammo is almost a reality.

I dunno.  They've been working on polymer hybrid cases for over half a century.

Below:  Left, 7.62 NATO from 1959.  Right, .221 IMP from 1973.  Look familiar?   ;^)

.

gatnerd

From: gatnerd

20/11/17

"I dunno.  They've been working on polymer hybrid cases for over half a century.

Below:  Left, 7.62 NATO from 1959.  Right, .221 IMP from 1973.  Look familiar?   ;^)"

 Yeah, it's still uncertain to be sure. Though the construction of these Velocity cases does look a bit different, with the metal being internal and the polymer overmolding part of the base - possibly reducing the risk of case head separation?

Still, my $0.25 bet (most I'm willing to bet on anything other the Roulette) is on the Shell Shock hybrid AL/Steel cases being the most successful near-term solution. 

poliorcetes

From: poliorcetes

20/11/17

https://www.google.com/patents/US9587919

 

http://appft1.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PG01&p=1&u=/netahtml/PTO/srchnum.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=20160091288.PGNR.

 

However, there are no images as far as my google-fu is about

 

BTW, what a nice collection of patents, Emeric. I'm impressed

autogun

From: autogun

20/11/17

gatnerd said...

Could you share some more info about the Neckless Cartridges?

See page 114+ of this article.

 

poliorcetes

From: poliorcetes

20/11/17

Tell me if I have understood it correctly: in order to maintain compatibility, part of the body of the bullet would act as a neck in the chamber?

If it is the case, then there would be a small gap in the chamber, corresponding to the thickness and volume of cartridge neck, right?

autogun

From: autogun

20/11/17

Best for Emeric to answer questions on this!

 

EmericD

From: EmericD

20/11/17

poliorcetes said...

Tell me if I have understood it correctly: in order to maintain compatibility, part of the body of the bullet would act as a neck in the chamber?

If it is the case, then there would be a small gap in the chamber, corresponding to the thickness and volume of cartridge neck, right?

Right.

The bullet is potentially unsupported during a much longer "freebore", so there is a need to mitigate unwanted consequences, but it's not significantly different from a CT round.

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