Science, Science and Religion -  James Webb Space Telescope (386 views) Notify me whenever anyone posts in this discussion.Subscribe
 
From: YoungGandalf DelphiPlus Member IconDec-25 8:46 AM 
To: All  (1 of 36) 
 14726.1 

The launch worked fine!

What is special about this telescope?

https://www.theguardian.com/science/2021/nov/27/james-webb-space-telescope-launch-delays-cost-big-bang

It is a telescope that observes infrared, heat radiation. In that wavelength dust clouds are transparent. The exciting regions of our home galaxy are full if dust. We will learn through this scope about planet formation. It should also make it possible for us to research the gas atmospheres of the extrasolar planets.

 
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From: ACEofALLacesJan-2 1:07 PM 
To: YoungGandalf DelphiPlus Member Icon  (2 of 36) 
 14726.2 in reply to 14726.1 

YoungGandalf said...

The launch worked fine!

Then there was this.........

                                      

                                                           I can just hear it now.......OOPS!~

 

 
From: Elderwulf(Terry) (KNAPPER44)Jan-2 4:39 PM 
To: ACEofALLaces  (3 of 36) 
 14726.3 in reply to 14726.2 

OMG!

 

 
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From: YoungGandalf DelphiPlus Member IconJan-8 10:29 AM 
To: All  (4 of 36) 
 14726.4 in reply to 14726.3 
 

 
From: TurkeyMasterJan-17 2:30 PM 
To: ACEofALLaces  (5 of 36) 
 14726.5 in reply to 14726.2 

As of 1/17/22 the solar shield has successfully deployed, as well as all the telescopic mirror panels.  However, it is far from operational.  It has traveled about 824,000 miles from earth (by comparison, the moon is about 235,000 miles away) and now has  only about 76.000 miles to each its proper orbit spot.  All the mirror panels will then be slowly adjusted over a period of several months until they are all perfectly aligned so that all the panels will operate as a single large mirror.  Then it will start taking infrared pictures.  Some of the very first pictures may be of the earth to measure world wide temperatures of the entire surface of the earth to add to climate change data.  They also want to study a super massive black hole that was recently discovered in a near by "mini" galaxy.  

In other words it will first be tested on "near by" objects before it starts looking back in time to the early universe where we will see it more detail than ever before because it will see though much of the dust surrounding and with the galaxies.  We may learn more about how the earliest galaxies were formed. However, what interests me the most, as I mentioned in another post, it the possibility that the JWST might discover signs of life on distant planets. 

 

 
From: ACEofALLacesJan-17 3:09 PM 
To: TurkeyMaster  (6 of 36) 
 14726.6 in reply to 14726.5 

TurkeyMaster said...

However, what interests me the most, as I mentioned in another post, it the possibility that the JWST might discover signs of life on distant planets. 

I sincerely doubt that ANY earth-based or orbiting telescope, possesses the ability to determine whether or not there is life of some distant planet.

Such a scope surely increases our ability to LOCATE potential planets which COULD harbor life.....but to actually "discover signs of life"?.......nahhhhh

 

 
From: YoungGandalf DelphiPlus Member IconJan-17 3:35 PM 
To: ACEofALLaces  (7 of 36) 
 14726.7 in reply to 14726.6 

Surely that means finding organic molecules in atmospheres, which have no known other origin than being products of life forms.

 

 
From: TurkeyMasterJan-17 3:36 PM 
To: ACEofALLaces  (8 of 36) 
 14726.8 in reply to 14726.6 

ACEofALLaces said...Such a scope surely increases our ability to LOCATE potential planets which COULD harbor life.....but to actually "discover signs of life"?.......nahhhhh

You might want to read up on the what the JWST is capable of doing before drawing conclusions.   Were it to observe the earth even from light years away, it's data would suggest that there is probably life here.   There are several ways in which this can be inferred, but I'll mention just one of them.  It would discover significant carbon dioxide in our planet's atmosphere.  Guess where CO2 comes from?          Hint: Only 1% of the carbon dioxide in our  atmosphere comes from geology.  The other 99% comes from the lungs of animals and/or the burning of fossil fuels. Either by engines, fire making beings, or in forest fires.  That is, from animals or burning trees. 

  • Edited January 17, 2022 3:46 pm  by  TurkeyMaster
 

 
From: ACEofALLacesJan-17 5:15 PM 
To: YoungGandalf DelphiPlus Member Icon  (9 of 36) 
 14726.9 in reply to 14726.7 

All I am saying YG, is that it is quite a stretch to be placing ones bets on something as vague as that.   IIRC, we have ALREADY found some of those chemical footprints in the atmospheres of places where no life (as we know it) could possibly survive.  There are times when I feel, the desire TO discover life elsewhere, is greater than the actual common sense to totally evaluate whatever "evidence" might come about.

Just my opinion of course...

 

 
From: ACEofALLacesJan-17 5:18 PM 
To: TurkeyMaster  (10 of 36) 
 14726.10 in reply to 14726.8 

TurkeyMaster said...

You might want to read up on the what the JWST is capable of doing before drawing conclusions.

Yessir, I will endeavor to take that recommendation under advisement.   I am simply not one to be jumping to conclusions, like some individuals do.  If you don't mind, I will take a more rational, "wait and see" approach.

 

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