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Fetching Problem   Behavior and Training

Started Nov-26 by DukeWarwick; 151 views.
DukeWarwick

From: DukeWarwick

Nov-26

I have a 7 month old female GSD. She is doing good on heeling, sit, come,  down, our stay is work in progress I have had her 2 months and she knew nothing when I got her. She was going to be kept to show and her breeder didn't do a thing with her she had never even had a collar and leash on because she didn't want to break her spirit. She has some real good DRR lines on her which is what I was interested in. Also some of the lines I have too. It took me one afternoon to teach her to heel the next day to teach her sit. She has started tracking.

While she fetches the ball she runs back towards me but lays the ball near by, if I call her she drops the ball. She picked up the idea of getting the ball real fast, faster then any of the other dogs she has a high play drive and is completely off food treat rewards.

All my dogs eventually got the idea to bring to object to me.

Any ideas to help her get the ball to me? She has been fetching for 2 weeks now, I try to keep this fun because right now its her only exercise she is in heat and I can't run her with my male who she loves to play with. I have trained all my dogs with the fun method but most were young puppies.

TIA

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Nov-26

I don’t usually use treats but if I wanted a dog to bring me something, I would wear a treat bag and reward instantly with food the dog loves if she brings it back. Don’t call her, just let her smell the treat from a distance.  @clay hill teaches a hold command so his dogs don’t drop the object.

CC to Clay Hill
FriedFishie

From: FriedFishie

Nov-26

Schubert and I have worked on fetch exactly this way - food for bringing it back, and then more play.

At first, as a baby puppy, Schubert didn't want to carry the ball the whole way over to me, either. It worked out for us for a few reasons. He eventually started to really like carrying things - balls, plush toys, leaves that moved once, anything. So he sort of fell naturally into carrying the ball over to me. The other helpful thing, though, is that he really, really likes to play chase. So I'd throw his ball, he'd go get it, and I'd run away from him as soon as he looked at me. Then he'd chase me, the ball still in his mouth. At that point, I did what DW suggested, and gave a treat in exchange for a ball.

We've now run into the problem of him not wanting to chase the ball so much as wanting me to chase him for it. Treats won't get him over to me. However, a second ball will. Fetch is now a two-ball game at my house, and it works. I also do change it up by chasing him sometimes, but I usually give a cue to signal him that it's time for chase and not for fetch.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Nov-26

I do that with fribees. He did not want to drop them so I taught Out using the second one. Now he spits them out.

DukeWarwick

From: DukeWarwick

Nov-26

Thanks for the advice I will give them a try and see which works better.

I did have one dog trained to hold before but she got to the point she really didn't like fetching so much.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Nov-26

Not all dogs are bred for fetching.  Fuller and Scott did a long term research project on dogs, many years ago.  One of their findings was that dogs who are taught fetch and retrieve as young puppies learn it faster and better than dogs taught as adults.  It is not a natural ability for every breed.  You can teach it but it will take longer.

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