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Effect of Betamethasone?   Triple Crown

Started May-9 by princeofdoc; 1273 views.
princeofdoc

From: princeofdoc

May-9

I'm truly confused.....

I have been researching this drug, apparently a Class C drug in terms of performance enhancement, and it is legal as a therapeutic.  But not to provide support to limit inflammation on race day.

OK, got it....

But, if BB and all the other trainers know this, and they know that their horses will definitely be tested on race day, WHY would any take a chance?  Makes zero sense to me.

Second, why is an anti-inflammatory drug illegal in this sport, while NFL players get shots of cortisone both to play, and in the middle of a game?

I have no ax to grind, I'm just curious.....

SameSteve G

From: SameSteve G

May-9

It's not illegal in the sport as you say in your paragraph 5, Prince.  It's got a 10 picogram threshold on race day.  Horses are not humans & since they cannot communicate the level of pain, etc. etc. it is intelligent & humane to err on the side of caution.  What NFL players, the trainers & doctors do is not an equivalent situation.  Not at all.

As to why?  Why does anyone who pushes the envelope do so?  Baffert isn't the only trainer who does so.  Hubris?  Greed?  Name & fame?  Who knows?   Of course, it's getting to be a habit for BB.

TexSquared

From: TexSquared

May-9

I will say with all the testing done now for so many different illegal meds, it's amazing that there still has only been one drug DQ in the Kentucky Derby, and it was back in 1968 due to... BUTE.

Almost as amazing as the fact that it took 145 runnings before the stewards decided to actually DQ a horse for interference.  You put 20 horses on a tight-turned 1 mile track, there's gonna be interference, bumping, checking, you name it.  It's like NASCAR at Martinsville (for those who don't know, Martinsville is a PAPERCLIP -- long straights and very sharp turns at each end).

Seems to be Churchill Downs and Kentucky Racing Commission are making up for lost time.  They made an example out of Luis Saez, and maybe they're going to do the same to Bob Baffert. They've been lenient for far too long (recall Justify...)

princeofdoc

From: princeofdoc

May-9

Tell me about Justify and leniency?  Sorry for my ignorance.....

princeofdoc

From: princeofdoc

May-9

Not just playing devil's advocate, but very interested in well-articulated positions, hopefully free of bias.....SO, exactly why is it so different with horses?  Has there been a study or two suggesting that anti-inflammatory medication damages them?  I'm not sure of the argument that NFL athletes can communicate pain is convincing, at least not to me.  They often play through pain, and the injections allow for this successfully.  I received a cortisone injection last year and it was absolutely magic how the pain subsided!  I know it needs to be limited, and perhaps it should be in both NFL athletes as well as horses, but the clarity you clearly have is escaping me.

SameSteve G

From: SameSteve G

May-9

I would like to see US racing have the same regulatory rigidity as one finds in the Japanese Racing Association.  While I think the Hong Kong Jockey Club is the platinum standard, I'd say that JRA sport more closely resembles the US sport than Hong KOng.

The historical permissiveness in US racing has not led to a better sport.  

It's mind boggling that in the long history of the Kentucky Derby, only 1 DQ for meds.  I think that speaks to the permissiveness rather than the sterling adherence to the regulations by trainers & vets.

SameSteve G

From: SameSteve G

May-9

princeofdoc said:

Has there been a study or two suggesting that anti-inflammatory medication damages them?

It doesn't damage them.  No one on this thread has even implied that's the case?  I said that how horses are medically treated is not equivalent to how humans are medically treated.  Plus, since the equine patient cannot communicate symptoms or severity, I also said it pays to err on the side of caution.

I agree with you that it needs to be limited.

I admit a bias for the safety, welfare & well-being of the equine athletes.  

princeofdoc

From: princeofdoc

May-9

As do I, most definitely.....I am only asking questions, because that's my nature, especially as I do research to understand a subject more completely.

I do admit a bias against jumping on a bandwagon.  If I hear of a much-maligned individual that is obviously implicated in wrongdoing, I often imagine there is exaggeration, and investigate further.  Likewise, if I hear of someone who is completely beyond reproach, I often wonder what we don't yet know about him/her :)

Oldbettowin

From: Oldbettowin

May-9

In the SA derby.  He never should have been allowed to run in the KY Derby.

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