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Montauk   Triple Crown

Started Oct-10 by RAESFAN; 665 views.
princeofdoc

From: princeofdoc

Nov-13

A little surprised that Todd has not officially worked him since the amazing debut....I'm hoping that the horse is not injured.  I know he discussed running him in the BC juv with the owner, but then said that the Remsen would be a possibility instead.  Now with no posted works, I'm thinking he is waiting until the January prep races.

If I were advising him, I would opt first for an ALW at either CD or GP, preferably around two turns, and then choose a prep at GP, before the big points races in March.

RAESFAN

From: RAESFAN

Nov-14

Some trainers today swear by these numbers. I believe Pletcher is one of them. He probably thinks the horse ran so fast, he needs time off. I have never understood that. How come track athletes don't "bounce"? I think it's all about the trainer's ability to manage the horse's preparation after the race. They need to be flexible enough to know how to get horses from race to race like in the old days, rather than just simply saying, "I'll give him more time". I can't remember seeing that back in the day, at least not to the degree I see it now.

Husker (Birdman506)

From: Husker (Birdman506)

Nov-14

RAESFAN said:

How come track athletes don't "bounce"?

"How come track athletes don't "bounce"?"

Au contraire - I believe we(they) do, but not necessarily to the extent that I infer you intend.  Similar to equine athletes, a lot depends on factors such as level of fitness (ability to bounce back after an extreme effort), conditions, mentality, etc.

I do long for olden times when trainers worked theirs much harder and with more frequency.  Then again, I believe the breed was hardier back in the mid-20th century.

SameSteve G

From: SameSteve G

Nov-14

RAESFAN said:

like in the old days

The horses down under run every couple of three weeks during the season.  Then again, they don't have to recover from pre-race meds, race day lasix, post-race meds, as well as being generally under-conditioned.

How many promising babies & sophomores does the Teflon Todd lose every year?

I think it's pitiful.

RAESFAN

From: RAESFAN

Nov-15

I ran track in high school, and generally I beat, and was beaten by the same people, and ran around the same times, except as I progressed. I never took a huge step back from one race to a next, particularly after running one of my faster times. Those fast times usually signified a move forward, and my times remain consistent in that range until I improved again over time. It was pretty linear up until I quit to focus on basketball and baseball.

I think as both you and Steve indicated, it's about conditioning, which is what I implied before. I think trainers now train for peak performances, rather than sustained excellence. I think some have too many horses, and don't get to know the individual athletes well enough. One size, does not fit all!

I don't know much about the medication part of the game, but I can imagine that would have a significant effect relative to recovery time. Why would the horse racing game allow what other sports do not? They always talk about what's best for the horse. That's laughable if they go out and have the horses drugged half the time.

Husker (Birdman506)

From: Husker (Birdman506)

Nov-15

I ran the mile in high school (last two years), and in my 30s - 50s was involved in running 10Ks - a marathon.  My favorite races were half-marathons.

I was no great shakes as a runner, but do remember one significant regression (bounce) in high school less than a week after a particularly arduous race the previous week.  It was a rainy, breezy cool day, so that probably had something to do with it both physically and mentally.  My time that day was something like 45 seconds slower than my previous best the week before.

Also remember a half that was more than 2 minutes slower (pace) than the 15 miler two weeks before.  It was hotter that day, but the 15 miler was a much more hilly course.

On balance, though, I tend to agree.  My better performances seemed to mark an improvement forthcoming.

[edited to add] Forgot to mention that I was no great shakes as a runner, but better than my couch potato days. :)

RAESFAN

From: RAESFAN

Nov-15

I would know nothing about distance running or preparation. I was a sprinter, and we were forced to run distances as a conditioning mechanism. I hated it! I probably short changed myself as a result.

Wintertrian

From: Wintertrian

Nov-17

RAESFAN said...

I ran track in high school, and generally I beat, and was beaten by the same people, and ran around the same times, except as I progressed. I never took a huge step back from one race to a next, particularly after running one of my faster times. Those fast times usually signified a move forward, and my times remain consistent in that range until I improved again over time. It was pretty linear up until I quit to focus on basketball and baseball.

I think as both you and Steve indicated, it's about conditioning, which is what I implied before. I think trainers now train for peak performances, rather than sustained excellence. I think some have too many horses, and don't get to know the individual athletes well enough. One size, does not fit all!

I don't know much about the medication part of the game, but I can imagine that would have a significant effect relative to recovery time. Why would the horse racing game allow what other sports do not? They always talk about what's best for the horse. That's laughable if they go out and have the horses drugged half the time.

These are excellent observations.   As is Husker's.   

 

It is indeed, about conditioning, and it seems like the mornings when I swim and don't do well is because I was not rested/didn't eat right in the days leading up and it finally catches up to me.  

Factoring in drugs for performance is a whole 'nother ballgame, and one that I am not confident I can conquer.  Nor am I interested in doing so.   

Since drugs (if not prescribed for a verifable medical condition, in which case horse should be put on rest)  are "unnecessary", I feel that learning about them is an "unnecessary" endeavor on my part.  :)

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