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Hosted by PAULFROMNYS|Malachi 3:16-18/Bible talk

Based on Malachi 3:16-18 I believe the Lord will harken to us as we consider his word together.

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The Anointing of the Holy Spirit #4   T. Austin Sparks

Started May-31 by PAULFROMNYS; 14 views.
PAULFROMNYS

From: PAULFROMNYS

May-31

   

David - a Great Example of Anointing

Having said that, I want to come to our subject more closely. I have read these portions from the books of Samuel, because very largely I think we are going to be occupied with David. David has within the compass of his life almost everything that we want to know about the meaning of the anointing. I am quite sure we shall never exhaust it in these messages, but I feel that the Lord will say some very precious things to us out from the experience and history of His servant David in connection with the anointing.

We read about the anointing of David. If you look at that chapter again, 1 Sam. 16, you will find that it comes in when God has finally rejected Saul, and Samuel is commanded concerning the anointing of God's own man, the man after His own heart. Samuel was evidently mourning very much for Saul, as the opening of the chapter shows, and the Lord reaffirms His rejection and commands him to fill his horn with oil: "...and go, I will send thee to Jesse the Bethlehemite: for I have provided me a king among his sons." Samuel is a little fearful of taking this action. He is evidently afraid of Saul and wants to know how the thing can be done without his being involved in the perils of anointing a successor to a living king, or one to take his place. But the Lord leads him and leads him to Jesse, and as you know, all the sons of Jesse excepting David were called.

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PAULFROMNYS

From: PAULFROMNYS

May-31

   And the Lord gave Samuel these two things: "I have provided me a king among his sons": and then the Lord said definitely: "Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature for the Lord seeth not as man seeth; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart." The Lord knows the peril of this thing. The Lord knows how His purposes can be just turned aside, how easy it will be for His intention to be hindered or thwarted. The Lord is taking everything into account. He knows what is going to follow. He knows what this movement involves, and so He takes precautions in His words to Samuel, and says to him in a precautionary word: "Look not on his countenance, or on the height of his stature; because I have refused him: for the Lord seeth not as man seeth; for man looketh on the outward appearance, but the Lord looketh on the heart." Now that is precautionary against a repetition of what has happened. Eliab, this fine, tall son of Jesse, has been brought and he in his stature and appearance compared favourably with Saul, who was head and shoulders above all the rest of Israel. That is what he was in himself, and Samuel was in danger of being impressed with what a man was in himself, and to find that which would obviously without any difficulty commend itself to the people as standing in a line with Saul. That was underlying this whole thing; that there should be the selecting of something upon a natural basis which would commend itself for what it was in itself. And the Lord was rejecting everything, however fine and great it might be, which was something in itself; He was rejecting that. "I have rejected him."

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PAULFROMNYS

From: PAULFROMNYS

May-31

   And so they go on, and even Samuel well nigh broke down on this thing: "Surely this is he," said Samuel, and upon his natural understanding, upon his own judgment, upon what appealed to him himself, he would have acted and anointed one who could stand well before men, who could take his place amongst men for what he was in himself; and right through the whole range all that sort of thing the Lord rejected. The Lord rejected right to the last all that was something in itself and that could commend itself to natural men, commend itself to religious people as such. No! The Lord was going to have no repetition of this thing. He has rejected, and there is no way for what is something in itself by nature.

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PAULFROMNYS

From: PAULFROMNYS

May-31

   

Well, there was no thought of bringing David. Samuel evidently remembered what the Lord said: "I have provided me a king among his sons." "Are here all thy children?" "Well, there is one other, but I did not think it worth while bringing him; he is more used to the sheep than anything else and he is out there looking after those sheep." "He is the youngest, the most insignificant, it is not worth while bringing him; I did not think it mattered about him at all." I am afraid Samuel, in not a hopeful way, said: "Send and fetch him: for we will not sit down till he comes hither."

An exceedingly perplexing situation. And so they brought David, and when they brought him in the Lord said: "Arise, anoint him: for this is he." Something is said about David which seems to contradict what I have said. Something good is said about him, about his appearance. It says that he was ruddy and of a beautiful countenance. I wonder why that? And why it should be put in the place where it is put. This is not put in a place where it is a point of commendation for the anointing. It is not made the ground of the anointing, but it does represent something when the command to anoint is given, for it is that outward expression of a secret history with God. That is what I want to get at.

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