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Hosted by PAULFROMNYS|Malachi 3:16-18/Bible talk

Based on Malachi 3:16-18 I believe the Lord will harken to us as we consider his word together.

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Fellowship of His Son #7   T. Austin Sparks

Started Jul-14 by PAULFROMNYS; 116 views.
PAULFROMNYS

From: PAULFROMNYS

Jul-14

   

The People and the Fellowship

"God is faithful, through Whom ye were called." "Ye were called into the fellowship of God's Son"Forgive me for being slowly emphatic, underlining every word. I told you yesterday that you'd have difficulty in keeping pace last night, but you'll have no difficulty in that way this morning! But we must move carefully together, not just hear words, but weigh them. Weigh them, because, you see, God always weighs things. The famous Dr. Parker, of the City Temple London, used to have a great midweek service in the Temple. People used to speak about the great number who attended, but Dr. Parker said, "I never measure my congregation: I weigh it." And that's it: God weighs us. God is weighing us all the time. God is not looking on the outside: He is weighing us on the inside. And so, we want to be "weighty" with every word this morning.

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PAULFROMNYS

From: PAULFROMNYS

Jul-14

   

A little word, "ye were called" just seems to bring the whole matter to us, but what "whole matter" does it bring to us? Of course, these words were addressed to the Corinthians. Yes, it was brought to the Corinthians, this statement, that "ye, ye here in Corinth were called"; but it did not begin with the Corinthians. This was the long, long thought of God, reaching right back into the past eternity where the Divine Counsels were framing what Paul called "the eternal purpose" and concerning which he will say in another letter, "ye are called according to the eternal purpose".

And this call to the Corinthians was in the way, the line, of those counsels from eternity, the God and Father Who "worketh all things after the counsel of His Own will." This call reached right the way back; it did not begin at Corinth with these people, but they were called into those goings of God from eternity. It was as though God, moving from eternity down through the ages, came by way of Corinth and as He came by way of Corinth, He cried, "You here are called, called into the fellowship of My Son. Come along: join in with all those who have responded to the call through the ages, and go on with Us to Our end, Our predestined end concerning My Son". That call had been sounding then, right through the ages reaching right back before the world was. It goes on.

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From: PAULFROMNYS

Jul-14

   

They have heard it of old, they've made their decision. Some have responded and gone on with God. Some have heard and made a response and turned aside, but God has gone on. God has gone on! Some have hesitated, weighing things up and deciding that it was too costly. They could not. But God has gone on. And there through history, the ages are strewn with people who heard the call, who God called, but have missed all that was involved in it.

God has slowly collected, shall I say, a people of the call through the ages; and He is still doing that, gathering a people into the fellowship of His Son. We might note, by way of collecting a few lessons from the mountain peaks of this call, there have been the valleys, in the valleys the ordinary people have been hearing and making their decisions. But there are these "mountain peaks" through history which in a special, particularly interesting, and instructive way, embody the meaning of this call. I mean, Abraham. We are not going to stay with these people, but we will just lift out some things that indicate what the call meant.

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PAULFROMNYS

From: PAULFROMNYS

Jul-14

   Stephen, in Acts 7, said, "The God of Glory appeared unto our father Abraham, when he was in Ur of the Chaldees, and said... 'Get thee out.'" "Get thee out" - the call to Abraham. We will see in a moment what that implied. But Abraham there in Ur of the Chaldees, with his one thousand or two thousand deities, met the One Deity or was met by the One Deity, the One God only, the God of Glory. Over all the deities of Chaldea, distinguishing a Voice, a Person, and isolating this whole matter of Divine relationship from all the other deities of worship to which Abraham was accustomed. He brings it all to one focus, to the God of Glory. The God of Glory, not just meaning, God Who is in glory, but the God Who has glory at the end as His object.

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From: PAULFROMNYS

Jul-14

   

The God of Glory appears, and Abraham heard the Voice, the call of the God of Glory and somehow, in some mystic way, some strange, inexplicable way, Abraham came to understand that his call was related to God's Son. Now you want to study his life, of course, don't you, and find the place of the Lord Jesus in the life of Abraham. There's no doubt about it, you cannot mistake His place in the life of Abraham as you go on, "Take now thy son, thine only son... whom thou lovest...". Abraham has come right into the very heart of God, right into the very heart of Calvary. I don't know, I can't explain it all, but I know somehow, somehow Abraham came himself into the fellowship of God's Son and it's marked again and again in his life, right up to that mighty, inclusive crisis of offering his only begotten son.

He came into the heart of God and the Lord Jesus Himself put His finger upon this strange, mystic something, of a relationship with the Son of God right away back there in the life of Abraham when He said, "Your father Abraham saw My day, and he rejoiced to see it." Well, we don't know how, but Abraham heard the call into fellowship with God's Son and, at the cost of everything, said, "Yes, I'll go." And he went. His name stands as one of those who, because of that response, at great cost all the way along, in the beginning and all the way along, because he made that response, see what his name represents in history! Well, leave that for a minute, we come back and pass on from Abraham to Moses.

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From: PAULFROMNYS

Jul-14

   We heard last night, here is Moses in the silent desolation of the wilderness, with all that is going on inside of him as he is looking at his life and looking at himself, and his deep-seated consciousness of standing in relationship to this God, Jehovah. There for his forty years of aloneness with God. One day, one day, not the burning bush, but the "non-burning" bush, the bush that never did consume, a fire that did not go out. He noticed that while all other bushes flared up and flamed up and died, this one never did. The undying bush, holding this secret of the Life which is eternal, the Life which is never extinguished: the power of His resurrection. Moses said, "I will draw near, I will turn aside and see this great wonder." He drew near, out from the bush there came a Voice, "Take off thy shoes from off thy feet: the place whereon thou standest is holy ground."

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PAULFROMNYS

From: PAULFROMNYS

Jul-14

   

And then the call and the commission, the challenge and the command. Moses heard the call. He tried to argue with God. He tried to enter into a controversy with God. Very good, very good, if your controversies with God and your arguments with God are of the same kind as that of Moses, it's very good. Really there is nothing wrong about that. Some controversies with God won't get you anywhere, but this got him along that way. It was a controversy on the basis of what God had been doing in his own life to bring him to the place of suitability to answer the call. You'll never be able really to enter into this fellowship, until, as our brother said last night, the bottom's been knocked out of you and you are able to say truly, "I've had a devastating experience, as with Moses, I cannot. I cannot." Ah, but you thought you could once! "No, I cannot." That's all right.

He heard the call, argued with God, but when it is on that ground, there is no use arguing with God. You are having to deal with God, and there's no use arguing. Here God is going to have the end in His Own Hand. He heard the call. Eventually, after arguing and after having to have a certain amount of accommodation made by the Lord to his situation, he went and obeyed. What a result! MosesMoses... what God can do and will do when our response is from the brokenness which God Himself has brought about, the emptying. Leave that for a minute.

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From: PAULFROMNYS

Jul-14

   

The next man who heard the call... where shall we go next? We might go on to David. David, a young man. A young man tending the sheep, his father's sheep - away from the city, away from the war, out there, living a life in secret with God. "The Lord who delivered me: the Lord who delivered me from the lion and the bear." He had a life with the Lord, his strength was drawn from the Lord; out there, this lad. And later he will say the Lord who called him from following the sheep, who called him from following the sheep. Out there in a simple way, the sovereign God called him, and you know the story. The vindication of David, I may have to speak about that again, the vindication of David was that his response to God was so complete, so utter. With everything you may say about his other, later life, there's a man whose heart has been captured by God. The call meant that for David.

We go on, leaving many, and come to the great prophet whom we all love so much, and perhaps can understand better than we can understand most of the others, the prophet Isaiah. You know the story, the account of chapter 6 of his prophecies, "The day that Uzziah died, I saw the Lord, high, lifted up: His train filled the temple. At His presence, the foundations did shake." And he goes on, the overwhelming consciousness of his own uncleanness and unfitness that always comes when you have come into the true presence of God. Isaiah said, "Woe is me! Woe is me! I am undone, I am undone."

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From: PAULFROMNYS

Jul-14

   

Here you have again the background of a great life of service and usefulness to the Lord. But then, he said, "I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Who will go for Us? Whom shall I send?" The call came to Isaiah in those circumstances, in the day when everything else had become a mere illusion; the day of disillusionment. Uzziah, Uzziah, that great king in Israel. Yes, Isaiah undoubtedly had fastened his eyes upon king Uzziah and he was his ideal, he was his hope and expectation for Israel. He was the man who answered to all Isaiah's desires, hopes, and expectations; and then, as you know, Uzziah broke down. He broke down, failed, and by his act in the Temple, was smitten by God with leprosy and was a leper until the day of his death. Poor Isaiah! All the glory of this world faded, and in that day, "I saw the Lord, high and lifted up." You can make your own applications and interpretations, we may say something, we shall, presently, about this.

Here is the course of God going on, on, on with His call into the fellowship of His Son, and Isaiah more than any other prophet has the place for the Son of God. We know that, don't we? Chapter 53 alone has that, but there is so much more. The Son of God is in view, and Isaiah has been called into the fellowship of God's Son, Jesus Christ. Leave that now, we'll return presently

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From: PAULFROMNYS

Jul-14

   

On we go. Shall we take one big leap right over to the apostles? Those apostles by the lakeside in their daily vocation as fisherman and Jesus passes that way. God passes that way and just calls this one and that one, "Come, follow Me." And they left their nets and followed. Very simple the account, isn't it, a lot involved though. But, they heard the call, that's the point. As one of the hymns, probably known to you, simply puts it, "I heard the call, 'Come follow,' that was all. I arose and followed." But, how tremendous was the involvement of the response to the call.

The apostles, and outstandingly the apostle Paul, three times he gives the account of his call, what was contained in it and what it was unto on the day that he heard the call, "Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou Me?" "Who art Thou, Lord? What wilt Thou have me to do, Lord?" And all the rest, because as he says, "I was not disobedient unto the heavenly vision."

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